Catalog 2017-2018 
    
    Mar 03, 2021  
Catalog 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Mathematics

  
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    MATH& 142 Pre-Calculus II

    5 credits
    This course includes the study of the properties, graphs, and applications of the trigonometric functions and their inverses, as well as a brief introduction to polar coordinates and vectors.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 141  

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Measure angles in degrees and radians and relate them to arc length 
    • Identify reference angles and coterminal angles
    • Solve applied problems involving arc length, linear/angular speed, and the area of a circular sector
    • Link the graphical, numeric, and symbolic definitions of the trigonometric functions in terms of the unit circle
    • Solve problems involving right triangles and unit circles using the definitions of the trigonometric functions
    • Apply the law of sines and law of cosines to solve for unknown sides and angles of triangles, and solve applied problems associated with these laws
    • Graph the trigonometric functions and their transformations
    • Identify key features including amplitude, period, and horizontal shifts from a graph, formula, table, or verbal description
    • Use trigonometric functions to model periodic behavior described numerically or verbally
    • Use the inverse trigonometric functions to solve equations
    • Prove trigonometric identities and use identities to algebraically solve trigonometric equations
    • Perform operations with vectors and use them to solve problems both graphically and component-wise
    • Relate coordinates in polar form to coordinates in rectangular form
    • Write clear, correct, and complete solutions to mathematical problems utilizing proper mathematical notation and appropriate language 
    • Use exact and approximate solutions when appropriate
    • Use problem solving skills, pattern recognition, substitution, structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems involving trigonometric functions, vectors, and alternative coordinate systems


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    MATH& 146 Introduction to Statistics

    5 credits
    This course covers the organization and graphical representation of data, measures of central tendency and variation, basic probability theory, discrete probability distributions and the binomial formula, the normal distribution, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, correlation, and linear regression.

    Prerequisites: MATH 098  recommended or MATH 099  (or equivalent placement score for MATH& 146)

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course the students will be able to:

    • Organize and graph data using scatterplots, histograms, and boxplots
    • Calculate mean, standard deviation, z-scores, and percentile values
    • Solve problems using the basic elements of probability theory, such as sample spaces, the addition rule, and the multiplication rule
    • Calculate the mean and standard deviation of a probability distribution
    • Calculate expected value
    • Calculate probabilities using the binomial probability formula
    • Calculate probabilities and find percentile values using the normal distribution and the central limit theorem
    • Construct and interpret confidence intervals
    • Perform hypothesis tests
    • Measure and test for correlation
    • Use regression equations to make predictions


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    MATH& 148 Business Calculus

    5 credits
    Surveys differential and integral calculus, emphasizing uses in business and social science. Intended for students who wish only a brief course in calculus.

    Prerequisites: MATH 145  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Construct and transform the graphs of common functions
    • Solve simple exponential equations
    • Use the product, quotient and chain rules to differentiate simple functions
    • Construct equations for tangents and find average and instantaneous rates of change
    • Apply the concepts, techniques and vocabulary of limits, continuity, and first and second derivatives to solve simple problems
    • Use simple substitutions and appropriate software to find antiderivatives of simple functions
    • Determine the values of definite integrals using the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
    • Apply the ideas of definite and indefinite integrals to solve problems
    • Recognize applications of differential and integral calculus to business problems


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    MATH& 151 Calculus I

    5 credits
    This first-quarter calculus course includes the study of function limits, and emphasizes differential calculus and its applications.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 142 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe a function verbally, algebraically, graphically, and numerically
    • Define and calculate limits
    • Define the derivative of a function
    • Interpret derivatives as slopes of tangent lines and rates of change
    • Differentiate polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions
    • Apply the product, quotient, and chain rules to differentiate functions
    • Use implicit differentiation
    • Graph functions and their derivatives
    • Use linear approximation to estimate the value of a function
    • Calculate the maximum and minimum values of a function
    • Apply L’Hospital’s rule for solving indeterminate forms
    • Approximate solutions using curve sketching
    • Define antiderivative and find the antiderivative of a function
    • Solve application problems using differential calculus
    • Use problem solving skills, pattern recognition, substitution, structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems involving differential calculus and limits


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    MATH& 152 Calculus II

    5 credits
    This second-quarter calculus course includes the study of integral calculus and its applications and an introduction to differential equations. A graphing calculator is required.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 151  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Calculate antiderivatives, areas and distances, and the definite integral
    • Solve and evaluate functions using The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
    • Solve and evaluate indefinite integrals
    • Compute the average value of a function
    • Integrate trigonometric functions
    • Solve equations using numerical integration and approximation of integrals
    • Evaluate improper integrals
    • Integrate by parts
    • Calculate the length of a curve, the area between curves, the volume of washers and shells, and center of mass
    • Use problem solving skills, pattern recognition, substitution, structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems involving integral calculus


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    MATH& 163 Calculus III

    5 credits
    The third quarter of the calculus sequence serves as an introduction to series, vectors, multivariable functions, partial differentiation, and multiple integration. Curves in planes and space are described in polar, parametric, and vector-valued form. Real world applications are emphasized.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 152  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use appropriate convergence tests to discuss the behavior of infinite series
    • Compute the Maclaurin and Taylor series expansions of basic and transcendental functions, and use them to solve relevant applications
    • Define vector-valued functions, and identify their key characteristics and graphs
    • Evaluate and interpret algebraic and calculus operations on vector functions and functions of two or more variables graphically, numerically, and analytically
    • Describe curves in planes and space using polar, parametric, and vector-valued forms, and identify situations where these alternate coordinate systems can simplify calculations
    • Calculate a path of motion, and describe its curvature, arc length, velocity, and acceleration
    • Differentiate and integrate parametric equations, polar equations, and vector-valued functions
    • Use double integrals in multiple coordinate systems, and apply principles to finding centers of mass and moments of inertia, volumes of solids, and other applications
    • Calculate partial derivatives for functions of several variables, using the chain rule as necessary, and use them to solve relevant applications
    • Use mathematical critical thinking skills, problem solving, pattern recognition, and substitution, following structural rules and quantitative modeling to solve problems requiring reasoning, critical thinking, and computation


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    MATH& 264 Calculus IV

    5 credits
    The fourth quarter of the calculus sequence continues the study of multivariable calculus, with emphasis on the calculus of vector-valued functions and space curves. Topics include partial derivatives, double and triple integrals, directional derivatives, gradient vectors, vector fields, Green’s Theorem, Stokes’ Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. Real world applications are emphasized.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 163  

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify key features of multivariable functions (local and absolute maximums and minimums, as well as saddle points)
    • Find the domain and range of a multivariable function, and sketch its typical level curve or level surface
    • Find both first-order and second-order partial derivatives of a multivariable function
    • Compute the gradient and apply it to finding equations of tangent lines and planes, as well as to computing directional derivatives of multivariable functions
    • Evaluate double and triple integrals, and apply these multiple integration principles to solving area, volume and average-value applications
    • Compute line and surface integrals, and use them to solve relevant applications
    • Use alternative coordinate systems (including polar, cylindrical, and spherical) to simplify multiple integration problems
    • Compute gradient, curl, and divergence, using vector and scalar fields appropriately
    • Apply Green’s Theorem, Stokes’ Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem
    • Introduce first-order differential equations, including initial value problems
    • Use mathematical critical thinking skills, problem solving, pattern recognition, and substitution, following structural rules and quantitative modeling to solve problems requiring reasoning, critical thinking, and computation


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Mechanical Design Technology

  
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    CADE 101 Architectural and Engineering Tools and Techniques

    3 credits
    Introductory exposure to tools and techniques used in the disciplines of mechanical design, architecture, civil design, and other design and engineering related fields. Includes an introduction to sketching, drafting with manual drafting tools, and an introduction to computer aided design (CAD) software. Emphasis is placed on communicating design intent. Examples from industry included to illustrate differences and similarities between industries.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Corequisites: CADE 102 , CADE 103 , and CADE 104  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create sketches related to design/engineering industries
    • Create design/engineering drawings using manual drafting tools to convey design intent
    • Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of computer aided design (CAD) software
    • Demonstrate an understanding of drawing views, scales, dimensioning, and tolerancing
    • Identify different design/engineering industries and their unique technical requirements


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CADE 102 Architecture and Engineering Introduction to Design Theory

    5 credits
    This course is an overview of theoretical practices associated with design from an architectural, mechanical, and civil engineering related perspective. Understanding the design process is the primary focus of this course. The discovery process of how to take a design from a problem/need to a design solution will be explored. Students are introduced to basic design principles that determine the form and function of designs. Assignments and exercises will incorporate sustainable practices, and student projects will employ management strategies.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement in MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement in ENGL 093  or higher)

    Corequisites: CADE 101 , CADE 103 , and CADE 104  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Develop a personal design process for addressing design problems
    • Incorporate and identify 2D and 3D design principles (hierarchy, proportion, implied space, etc.) and examine how they are used in various design solutions
    • Critique the effectiveness of a design based on its form and function
    • Communicate design solutions through the use of sketching and modeling
    • Manage personal and team projects


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    CADE 103 Projects and Professional Practice

    5 credits
    A project-based overview and exposure to the disciplines of mechanical design, architecture, and civil engineering. Emphasis is placed on creative development of student ideas and their projects. Students learn to think critically, solve problems, and iterate design solutions within the context of different disciplines. Students learn the roles that individuals within interdisciplinary teams play in industry projects. Industry examples, along with industry specific guest speakers, provide greater insight into job related expectations, duties, and career trajectories.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcomes of Communication and Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Determine a career path that is most suited to their strengths and interests
    • Collaborate on the design of interdisciplinary projects
    • Work in teams to research, organize, and synthesize information from a variety of sources regarding different types of design and engineering projects
    • Recognize and describe the different roles of the designer/technician
    • Explore different design/engineering industries and identify their unique technical requirements


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    CADE 104 Engineering Computer Applications

    2 credits
    This is an introduction to the use of personal computers and file management specific to the engineering environment. Course will include hands-on experience with Windows, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, plus various basic programs as they relate to graphic programs.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Corequisites: CADE 101 , CADE 102 , and CADE 103  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate basic computer operation skills and use of computer equipment and file storage media in an engineering environment
    • Create, organize, and manage a filing system in a network environment
    • Create and organize an engineering oriented filing system
    • Insert various engineering related files (such as .BIT, JPEG, TIFF) into other formats (AutoCAD®, CATIA®, SolidWorks®, and other graphics files)
    • Use Microsoft Office® products as they pertain to engineering applications and presentations
    • Use email attachments for document exchange
    • Apply online research techniques
    • Demonstrate familiarity with computer use in a collaborative engineering environment


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CADE 131 AutoCAD I

    4 credits
    An introductory course in Computer Aided Drafting and Design using state of the art software. Emphasis is placed on using the basic commands such as coordinate system, editing, screen, text, and dimensioning commands.

    Prerequisites: CADE 101 , CADE 102 , CADE 103 , and CADE 104  

    Corequisites: CADE 132  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create and modify existing basic geometry using AutoCAD
    • Modify existing screen controls during CAD editing sessions
    • Apply correct dimensioning standards to drawings by completing drawings
    • Generate plots by using output devices


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CADE 132 AutoCAD II

    4 credits
    An advanced course in Computer Aided Drafting and Design. This is a 2D class that has its focus on architectural, civil, and mechanical scaling for engineering drawings.

    Prerequisites: CADE 101 , CADE 102 , CADE 103 , and CADE 104  

    Corequisites: CADE 131  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create mechanical drawings by using different mechanical scales
    • Create architectural drawings by using architectural scales
    • Create civil drawings by using civil scales
    • Apply external references by creating an industry drawing of architectural details using “Xrefs”
    • Use problem solving skills to demonstrate an understanding of how and why to modify external references on drawings by changing “Xrefs” on detail drawing
    • Recognize and describe the components of critical thinking


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CADE 202 Specialized Technical Employment Preparation

    2 credits


    An advanced course in specialized employment preparation for the technology industry. Course covers job search techniques including resume writing, cover letters, job applications, interviewing techniques, and portfolio preparation. Use of joblines and developing networks is included.

    Prerequisites: Taken the final quarter of Architectural Technology, Engineering Graphics Mechanical Design Emphasis, and Civil Engineering Graphics Emphasis degrees and certificates.

    Architectural Technology: ARCH 210  and ARCH 212  (can be taken as corequisites for certificate-seeking students)

    Engineering Graphics Mechanical Design Emphasis: ENGT 255  

    Civil Engineering Graphics Emphasis: CIVL 205  and CIVL 206  (can be taken as corequisites for certificate-seeking students)

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Prepare a field focused, self-inventory of existing job skills
    • Design and produce company/position specific resumes
    • Compile and present a strong list of professional and personal references
    • Design and produce a high quality professional portfolio
    • Utilize a contact list of industry specific companies with potential job openings
    • Prepare business quality cover letters
    • Practice effective interview techniques
    • Produce and maintain a job search log
    • Utilize corporate on-line job postings
    • Recognize and describe different cultures


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20

  
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    ENGT 121 Graphic Problem Solving

    4 credits
    This class focuses on graphic problem solving. Principles and techniques of descriptive geometry and section views are the main subject taught. Students will also learn how to create development patterns. Emphasis is placed on ASME standards.

    Prerequisites: CADE 101 , CADE 102 , CADE 103 , and CADE 104  

    Corequisites: CADE 131  and CADE 132  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Construct multi-view drawings in accordance with descriptive geometry rules #1 & #2
    • Construct multi-view drawings using fold lines, projection lines, and point labeling and identification
    • Apply descriptive geometry as a graphic problem solving technique to find:  true length of a line, true size and shape, intersections exact piercing points, etc.
    • Demostrate the understanding and purpose of section views and developments by creating engineering drawings
    • Dimension drawings to ASME standards


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 123 Introduction to Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing

    4 credits
    This is a more advanced class on dimensioning with an added focus on tolerancing. Students will learn how dimensions relate to the form, fit, and function of the part by the application of linear and geometry tolerancing. ASME and ISO standards are used.

    Prerequisites: CADE 131 , CADE 132 , and ENGT 121  

    Corequisites: ENGT 141 , ENGT 225 , and MACH 108  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply industry standard dimensioning systems to parts and features on manufacturing drawings
    • Use correct geometry tolerancing techniques to areas of parts that mate with other parts.
    • Use the correct tolerancing techniques by discriminating between areas that need linear and form tolerancing on drawings
    • Apply tabular style dimensioning on industry drawings
    • Apply RC, LC, LT, LN, and FN fits on parts that fit together


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 133 AutoCAD III

    4 credits
    An advanced course in Computer Aided Drafting and Design that introduces the student to 3D surfacing and modeling. The students will also learn how to create 2D dimensional drawings from 3D modeling.

    Prerequisites: CADE 131  and CADE 132  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the ability to create wireframe drawings
    • Apply bitmap images to faces of wireframe geometry
    • Create rendered image of wireframe geometry
    • Create solid models using primatives, extrusions, revolutions, and intersections
    • Generate 2D drawings from 3D models


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 141 Applied Materials Technology

    4 credits
    Relationships between properties, structure and processes of engineering materials. Discussion of surfaces, finishes and manufacturing processes. Various engineering materials are included with an emphasis on metals and polymers.

    Prerequisites: CADE 131 , CADE 132 , and ENGT 121  

    Corequisites: ENGT 123 ENGT 225 , and MACH 108  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the relationship between properties, structure and processes of engineering materials
    • Apply specifications regarding surfaces, finishes, and manufacturing processes
    • Recognize and specify engineering materials with an emphasis on metals and polymers


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 145 Product Design Principles

    4 credits
    This course is an overview of the conceptual and manual skills designers use when creating design concepts.  Critical thinking is the primary focus of this course.  3-dimensional form will be explored through the use of sketching and modeling. Emphasis is placed on effective communication of student ideas and their projects.  Students learn to frame questions, solve problems and iterate design solutions.

    Prerequisites: CADE 101 , CADE 102 , CADE 103 , and CADE 104  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Incorporate and identify the principles of 2D and 3D design (symmetry, rhythm, proportion, unity, space, etc.,) and examine how they are used in various design solutions
    • Differentiate between problem posing and problem solving
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the design process as it relates to concept generation and the development of 3-dimensional objects
    • Communicate product concepts through the use of sketching and modeling
    • Identify Gestalt principles and how they apply to the design
    • Effectively present and defend individual design project during critique sessions
    • Explain the design process including problem identification, the creative brief, creating iterations and identifying multiple solutions, presenting concepts, and providing deliverables


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ENGT 211 Applied Industrial Graphics

    4 credits
    Application of advanced engineering skills to create complex detail drawings of machined and cast metal parts from engineering sketches with emphasis on ASME, DOD and ISO standards. Includes research and use of various reference materials and vendor resources and media selection.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 123 , ENGT 141 , ENGT 225 , and MACH 108  

    Corequisites: ENGT 226  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon succesful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Develop drawings by interpreting engineering sketches and/or measuring of actual parts
    • Create functionally complete casting, machined, plastic and sheet metal drawings
    • Correctly apply research resources and references to lab assignments
    • Apply functional dimensioning and tolerancing procedures to mechanical part drawings
    • Apply proper industry standard drawing notation to mechanical part drawings
    • Demonstrate how the concepts and processes of manufacturing affect drawings by showing considerations during drawing creation


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 222 Catia V5 For Engineering I

    4 credits
    Introduction to 3D modeling and parametric design using CATIA Version 5 software. Application of advanced engineering graphics skills to create basic parts and assemblies in both solids and wireframe.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 133  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create new models by inserting parts from other assemblies
    • Generate new models from Part Design Workbench using CATIA editing commands
    • Create local axis systems
    • Create new models by constructing wireframes for planer profiles
    • Analyze wireframes for accuracy
    • Construct, modify, and analyze solid parts


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 223 Catia V5 For Engineering II

    4 credits
    Advanced 3D modeling and parametric design using CATIA software. Application of advanced engineering graphics skills to create complex parts and assemblies in both solids and wireframe.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 133  or ENGT 222  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Merge geometry into seed models
    • Create and modify drawing views using the Drafting Workbench
    • Create and modify dimensions and text using the Drafting Workbench
    • Insert symbols
    • Plot and manage stored plots
    • Manipulate drawings with the use of Space-Draw associativity


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 224 Catia V5 For Engineering III

    4 credits
    Advanced 3D modeling and parametric design using CATIA software. Application of advanced engineering graphics skills to create complex parts and assemblies in both solids and wireframe. Continuation of ENGT 223 .

    Prerequisites: ENGT 133  or ENGT 223  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create advanced 3-dimensional surfacing using Wireframe and Surface Design Workbench
    • Create the sheet metal parts for assemblies using Generative Sheet Metal Design Workbench
    • Create advanced complex model assemblies with detailed drawings
    • Perform volumetric analysis using the analysis function on assemblies
    • Perform analysis on the hierarchy and logical connections between elements of assemblies


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 225 Solidworks For Engineering I

    4 credits
    An advanced course in engineering graphics using feature based, parametric, state of the art software. Students will learn and apply parametric solid modeling techniques to create machined and cast metal, sheetmetal and plastic parts working from engineering sketches and/or prototypes.

    Prerequisites: CADE 131 CADE 132 , and ENGT 121  

    Corequisites: ENGT 123 ENGT 141 , and MACH 108  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the use sketch planes, sketches, dimensions, and basic feature creations
    • Show proficiency in application of solid modeling commands to create three dimensional engineering models
    • Apply assembly mating techniques
    • Create 3D sheet metal parts, drawings, and flat patterns
    • Show the ability to create 3D models using parametrics
    • Demonstrate ability to create multiple views from solid models


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 226 Solidworks For Engineering II

    4 credits
    An advanced course in engineering graphics using feature based 3D parametric, state of the art software. Students will learn and apply parametric solid modeling techniques to create machined, cast metal, sheetmetal and plastic parts and mated assemblies working from engineering sketches and/ or prototypes.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 123 ENGT 141 ENGT 225 , and MACH 108  

    Corequisites: ENGT 211  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create complex parts using lofts, sweeps, and revolves
    • Show proficiency in application of photo-realistic rendering tools to create images of three dimensional engineering models
    • Demonstrate mastery over basic parametric modeling and drawing tools and techniques


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 227 Solidworks For Engineering III

    4 credits
    An advanced course expanding on the use of feature-based parametric. Students will apply parametric solid modeling and photo-realistic rendering techniques to create complex parts and assemblies using Top-Down assembly and multiple-configuration techniques working from engineering sketches and/or measured parts.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 226  or instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create complex parts using Features commands
    • Show proficiency in application of Top-Down assembly methods
    • Model basic components using Configuration modeling and Design Table tools


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 244 Mechanical Design With Inventor

    4 credits
    An introductory course using feature-based, parametric, software. Students will learn and apply parametric solid modeling techniques to create welded structures, cast metal and machined parts, sheet metal and plastic parts working from engineering sketches and/or prototypes.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 131  or instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the use of sketch planes, sketches, dimensions, and basic feature creations in Inventor
    • Show proficiency in application of solid modeling commands to create three dimensional, parametric, and engineering models
    • Apply assembly mating techniques
    • Create 3D sheet metal parts, drawings, and flat patterns
    • Create 3D models of weldments, machined parts, and corresponding drawing package
    • Demonstrate ability to create drawings with multiple views including sections from solid models
    • Demonstrate ability to dimension machined parts, weldments, and sheet metal parts to ASME standards
    • Demonstrate ability to create assemblies to include sheet metal parts and weldments, combined with individual parts and parts from libraries


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 251 Industrial Design Graphics

    4 credits
    This advanced class has an emphasis on different media, software and techniques used to create innovative solutions for two and three-dimensional design problems. Fundamental product design principles and the human interface are explored. Focus is on team approach to design.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 211 , ENGT 226 , and ENGT 291  

    Corequisites: ENGT 253  and ENGT 255  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use I.D. terms and definitions in industry projects
    • Develop designs using basic anthropometric relationships
    • Use fundamental concepts of form, color, & texture to solve design problems
    • Solve design problems with original solutions using 2D and 3D design software to develop and render completed designs


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ENGT 253 Machine Design Graphics

    4 credits
    Introduction to machine design graphics with emphasis on techniques necessary to graphically solve linkage, cam, belt drive, chain drive, and gearing problems. Includes fundamental kinematics.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 211 , ENGT 226 , and ENGT 291  

    Corequisites: ENGT 251  and ENGT 255  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interpret, and document kinematic diagrams and systems
    • Apply the four common types of motion:  Linear, Reciprocal, Rotary and Oscillating
    • Reverse-Engineer simple and complex linkages
    • Identify and specify different types of cams and followers
    • Suggest and document design improvement(s) to existing product


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 255 Tool Design Graphics I

    4 credits
    Introduction to tooling design graphics: types and functions of jigs and fixtures, supporting and locating principles. Focus on team approach to design.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 211  and ENGT 226  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply standards of basic tool design
    • Design and document basic tools


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ENGT 256 Tool Design Graphics II

    4 credits
    Advanced concepts involved in tool design graphics. Continuation of Tool Design Graphics I. Focus is on individual approach to design.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 255  

    Total Hours: 66 Lecture Hours: 22 Lab or Clinical Hours: 44
  
  •  

    ENGT 257 Tool Design Graphics III

    4 credits
    Advanced concepts involved in tool design graphics. Continuation of Tool Design Graphics II. Focus is on individual approach to design.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 256  

    Total Hours: 66 Lecture Hours: 22 Lab or Clinical Hours: 44
  
  •  

    ENGT 258 Microstation I

    4 credits
    This is an introductory course in CAD drafting using MicroStation software. Emphasis is placed on using basic commands such as coordinate systems, editing, screen, text, and dimensioning commands.

    Prerequisites: CADE 132  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create and modify existing basic geometry using MicroStation
    • Modify existing screen controls during CAD editing sessions
    • Apply correct dimensioning standards to drawings
    • Generate plots by using output devices


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 259 Microstation II

    4 credits
    This is an intermediate course in CAD drafting using MicroStation software. Focus of the course is in using special features, customizing functions, and 3D design.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 258  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create and modify existing geometry using MicroStation
    • Create drawings using different scales
    • Manipulate graphic images
    • Customize line styles and functions
    • Use orthographic project in views
    • Use 2D elements in a 3D environment 


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGT 265 Product Design Theory and Context

    4 credits


    This course provides a survey of product design from theoretical and contextual perspectives. Students will explore past and current theories underlying product design.  Students will receive an introduction to design strategies and examine the design processes in greater depth; including research, ideation, project definition, context analysis, and need finding.  Project focus will exist at the intersection between the user and their context.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 145  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

    • Develop the skills that will foster perception, comprehension, and design of meaningful objects and spaces
    • Translate through different ideation techniques the effective expression of a concept
    • Illustrate a broad understanding of the complexities involved in past and present design theories
    • Develop the skills required for visual and verbal communication of design concepts
    • Develop a design process that serves as the foundation for decision making
    • Demonstrate the ability to critically analyze work done by other designers

     

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
  •  

    ENGT 271 Engineering Graphics Problems and Analysis I

    4 credits
    Capstone Project: Integrating and applying skills of previous courses. Engineering graphics problem solving to create innovative solutions for two and three dimensional design problems. Focus is on new product design.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 251 , ENGT 253 , and ENGT 255  

    Corequisites: CADE 202  and ENGT 272  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Solve 2D and 3D design problems from various design specifications and customer requirements
    • Use 3D modeling and rendering to illustrate and present designs
    • Conceptualize and present new product design concepts


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ENGT 272 Engineering Graphics Problems and Analysis II

    4 credits
    Continued Capstone Project: Integrating and applying skills of previous courses. Engineering graphics problem solving to create innovative solutions for two and three dimensional design problems. Focus is on new product design.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 251 ENGT 253 , and ENGT 255  

    Corequisites: CADE 202  and ENGT 271  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Solve 2D and 3D design problems from various design specifications and customer requirements
    • Use 3D modeling and rendering to illustrate and present designs
    • Apply “Art to Part”, CNC or Rapid Prototyping technologies to design solutions


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ENGT 283 Digital Design Fabrication and Prototyping

    4 credits
    This course provides a survey of the field of design fabrication and prototyping from the perspective of design, materials, and industry practices. Students will be guided through a lab environment using rapid prototyping devices and physical modeling techniques. Theoretical underpinnings will suggest how the “machine” is becoming more integrated into the design process.

    Prerequisites: CADE 131  or GAME 124  or instructor permission

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate familiarity with contemporary fabrication/prototyping techniques
    • Critically evaluate design work from a fabrication/ prototyping perspective
    • Demonstrate a broad understanding of the tools, software, and equipment used in digital fabrication and prototyping
    • Implement methods of digital fabrication and physical prototyping into designs
    • Employ creative and critical thinking to enhance problem solving


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ENGT 291 Design, Build, Test, Repeat

    5 credits
    A collaborative, multi-disciplinary, hands-on exploration and use of varying methods of part, mechanism, and product build, analysis, and testing. Focus will be on proving/disproving/improving functional design for use. The positive and negative aspects of Engineering Failure will be explored. Scientific and practical methods will be applied to a range of part, mechanism, and product designs.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 123 ENGT 141 ENGT 225 , and MACH 108  

    Corequisites: ENGT 211  and ENGT 226  

    Quarters Offered: Cohort 1: Fall; Cohort 2: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an ability to determine the design needs of the customer
    • Define “Failure” and its productive application to the design process
    • Apply hands-on, physical prototyping and testing methods to improve design performance and function
    • Work in a collaborative environment
    • Show functional level of proficiency in safe and effective use of practical test methods, tools, and machines
    • Demonstrate proficiency in use of Finite Element Analysis software to determine “problem” areas on a part or mechanism


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60

Medical Assisting

  
  •  

    MEDA 115 Law and Ethics

    3 credits
    Addresses ethical concerns and legal considerations for medical office staff and medical records management. Gain knowledge of medical contracts, explore workplace legalities, historical and social issues, and workplace responsibilities.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 099  (or placement into ENGL& 101 

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Understand legal considerations encountered in the medical office
    • Identify ethical dilemmas encountered in health care
    • Communicate effectively to patients with culturally diverse backgrounds
    • Discuss the legal implications of professional interaction and communication between team members in a medical setting


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    MEDA 116 Medical Terminology

    5 credits
    Basic structure of medical terms including Greek and Latin roots, prefixes, suffixes, word analysis, spelling, and pronunciation. An overview of anatomical terms with an introduction to the basic concepts of health and disease.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize basic medical terminology as a foundation for delivery of medical care
    • Relate medical terminology to anatomy and physiology
    • Spell, define, and pronounce given medical terms
    • Discuss client care and outcomes in the clinical setting
    • Use medical terminology to provide effective and accurate communication between other healthcare team members and patients


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MEDA 118 Examine Room and Patient Preparation

    5 credits
    Introduction to clinical procedures in the medical office. Includes medical asepsis, Universal Precautions, vital signs, charting, preparing patient and rooms for examinations, first aid, and nutrition.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher), BIOL& 175 MEDA 115 , and MEDA 116  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply knowledge of medical asepsis and Universal Precautions
    • Apply correct technique for assisting with/performing procedures
    • Apply safety practices in the medical office
    • Work effectively as a healthcare team member
    • Use critical thinking when performing technical skills required in a clinical setting
    • Respect different cultural beliefs
    • Apply principles of team work


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    MEDA 119 Intercultural Awareness in Health Care

    3 credits


    This course is designed to help you explore, understand, and appreciate the challenges posed by cultural and ethnically diverse patient populations. Meeting the health care needs of culturally diverse individuals requires sensitivity and respect for the inherent beliefs, cultural traditions, medical practices, and inherent needs of each community.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 099 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Communicate effectively to patients with culturally diverse backgrounds
    • Discuss the intercultural implications of professional interaction and communication between team members in a medical setting
    • Understand and appreciate the healthcare needs, beliefs, and practices of patients of diverse cultural backgrounds
    • Recognize and explain key issues, barriers, and alternatives to healthcare delivery for patients of diverse cultural backgrounds
    • Identify the salient beliefs and important traditions of diverse patient populations in terms of health promotion and wellness, illness and disease prevention, and health restoration
    • Demonstrate cultural competence in health care contexts

     

    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
  •  

    MEDA 121 Medical Office Skills

    5 credits
    Medical office procedures including scheduling guidelines and telephone techniques related to the medical office, filing, accounts receivable/payable, payroll, inventory control, billing procedures, collections.

    Prerequisites: BTE 101  (or test out), ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher), MEDA 115 , and MEDA 116  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform medical office procedures
    • Apply safety practices for the medical office
    • Apply scheduling and telephone techniques
    • Maintain medical records and patient confidentiality
    • Communicate with healthcare team members and patients in a medical setting
    • Effectively perform basic operations of medical office equipment and computer programs or software


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    MEDA 125 Phlebotomy

    3 credits
    An overview of phlebotomy and the role of the phlebotomist in health care. Study includes circulatory system, infection control, clinical laboratory safety, and phlebotomy procedures and equipment. Laboratory hours provide students with hands on activities to gain skill competency in venipuncture and capillary specimen collection.

    Prerequisites: MEDA 118  and IFAD 216  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the circulatory system in blood collection
    • Apply knowledge of laboratory safety and infection control
    • Appropriately utilize the equipment used in blood collection including multiple tube draws
    • Apply knowledge of quality management and legal issues important to the phlebotomy practice
    • Apply clinical skills in capillary blood draws and performance of various lab procedures.
    • Apply clinical skills in specimen handling and preparation for submittal to laboratory for analysis
    • Practice lab safety and adhere to OSHA/WISHA guidelines
    • Educate special populations and patients of culturally diverse backgrounds regarding the global effect of AIDS 


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    MEDA 129 Pharmacology

    5 credits
    Basic concepts of pharmacology including legal issues, dosage calculation, drug reactions, and an overview of the most frequently prescribed medications.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175 , MEDA 116  and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify drug classifications, drug forms, drug actions, side effects, and emergency procedures with emphasis on the 50 most commonly prescribed drugs from previous year
    • Maintain patient medical records
    • Identify applicable state and federal regulations regarding medications
    • Use PDR for finding drug information
    • Write a prescription as ordered by physician
    • Compute and calculate dosages for administration at an advanced level
    • Assess patient drug profiles based on both prescription and non-prescription medications and disorder being treated
    • Correlate common disorders of the systems of the body with common medications utilized in the management of the disorders
    • Identify safety practices concerning medications
    • Use proper terminology and documentation of medications prescribed in the patient chart
    • Demonstrate effective communication of safety and compliance in medication administration to patients of diverse cultural backgrounds for providing competent medical care
    • Demonstrate critical thinking skills when interpreting medication orders and directives to the patient


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MEDA 136 Coding/Billing/Insurance

    5 credits


    Introduction of insurance terminology, terms, phrases and abbreviations. Learn ICD-10 coding, CPT coding, and HCFA-1500 billing forms, and basics of claims management.

    Prerequisites: MEDA 121  and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher)  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Analyze the different types of managed care plans in local area
    • Differentiate between Medicare Part A and Part B
    • Review a managed care manual and develop an office policy and procedure for the acceptance of managed care patients
    • Obtain pre-certification and pre-authorization for a simulated managed care patient
    • Cite advantages and disadvantages of participating and non-participating insurance companies for a physician
    • Complete HCFA-1500 forms for a government plan and a commercial carrier
    • Outline the procedure for obtaining a managed care referral for a patient
    • Outline the procedure for obtaining a pre-certification approval for a patient
    • Explain the importance of coding statistics to a utilization study
    • Locate codes with modifiers and symbols in the CPT book
    • Explain how to locate codes in the HCPCS manual
    • Extract procedures from sample charts and match the procedure with the correct code from the CPT book
    • Create a master list of the most common diagnostic codes for a specific practice
    • Cite which volumes are used primarily by coders in ambulatory care settings
    • Extract diagnosis from sample medical charts
    • Locate correct diagnostic code in ICD-9 CM coding books
    • Complete claim forms using a medical insurance billing software
    • Complete claim forms for Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Medicare, Medicaid, commercial carriers, military and managed care
    • Reconcile payment rejections with a sample explanation of benefits form
    • Cite the process for an appeal of an unpaid claim
    • Outline the steps for follow-up on claims
    • Review a sample fee schedule for a physician
    • Explain the terms, “usual and customary” and “usual and reasonable”
    • Define diagnosis-related groups
    • Explain the doctor’s fee schedule to the patient
    • Understand the correlation of the CPS code(s) to the ICD-9 CM code(s) and the medical necessity for reimbursement of the procedure/service
    • Work effectively as a team member in the medical office setting


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
  •  

    MEDA 139 Assist with Exam and Administer Medications

    4 credits
    Intermediate clinical skills including infection control, sterilization and disinfection techniques, minor surgery assisting, wound care, administration of injections, safety practices for administering medications, therapeutic modalities, eye and ear procedures.

    Prerequisites: MEDA 118  and IFAD 216  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify principles and procedures of medication administration and systems of measurement
    • Calculate and administer oral and parenteral medications accurately as directed by the physician
    • List principles of selected physical therapy procedures
    • Explain principles of radiographic equipment and procedures
    • Prepare patient for and assist with specialty procedures, treatments, and minor office surgery
    • Identify, set up, and assist in minor surgical procedures; identify and respond appropriately to patients’ needs
    • Apply the methods of appropriate patient education
    • Perform within the scope of training and education
    • Educate patients in the methods of health promotion and disease prevention
    • Maintain medical asepsis and sterilization
    • Correctly use and care for medical surgical equipment and instruments
    • Administer injections correctly and safely
    • Use proper terminology and documentation of medications prescribed in the patient chart
    • Implement medication orders and directives of other healthcare team members 


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    MEDA 140 Medical Reimbursement Systems

    5 credits
    A review of various types of health insurance plans, such as state, federal and managed care. Students will learn insurance claims processing cycle, billing systems, and required documentation. The students will have the opportunity to apply their knowledge in a laboratory setting utilizing billing software.

    Prerequisites: MEDA 136 , MEDA 211 , or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply knowledge of basic insurance terminology, phrases, and abbreviations
    • Work effectively as a team member in the medical office setting
    • Correctly fill out HCFA billing forms
    • Correctly code insurance billing forms using ICD9-CM/ICD10-CM and CPT codes


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    MEDA 154 Intermediate Medical Coding

    5 credits
    Introduction to coding in ambulatory care settings using CPT, HCPCS Level 1. Common practices and problems associated with insurance organizations will be explored in relation to coding ICD-10-CM and CPT. Patient classifications and their relationships to coding assignment and finances will also be explored.

    Prerequisites: MEDA 136  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply knowledge of basic insurance terminology, phrases, and abbreviations
    • Correctly fill out HCFA billing forms
    • Correctly code insurance billing forms using ICD9-CM/ ICD10-CM and CPT codes
    • Work effectively as a team member in the medical office setting


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    MEDA 211 Medical Computer Applications

    5 credits
    Computerized medical billing simulation includes scheduling patients, establishing accounts, posting charges, changes to the accounts, month-end activity, insurance tracking and basic use of electronic medical records software programs for charting, tracking lab orders and prescriptions.

    Prerequisites: MEDA 121  and MEDA 136  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform routine maintenance of administrative equipment
    • Utilize computer software to maintain office systems
    • Use methods of quality assurance
    • Use medical software to schedule and manage appointments
    • Utilize medical software to maintain office systems including but not limited to daily backup, database updates, and software upgrades
    • Perform virus scans and file cleaning protocol
    • Perform operating system maintenance
    • Manage electronic mail
    • Analyze a variety of office issues, formulate an action plan to solve the issue and critique outcomes and respond accordingly
    • Use electronic medical record software
    • Apply MS office products in the health care setting
    • Utilize electronic tools to manage a medical office


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    MEDA 212 Diagnostic Testing in Medical Office

    5 credits
    Advanced clinical skills including, ECGs and Spirometry, plus the following laboratory CLIA waived tests: hematology, microbiology, immunology, chemistry, and urinalysis.

    Prerequisites: MEDA 116  and MEDA 125  

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of laboratory safety
    • Discuss quality control, demonstrating understanding of why quality control procedures promote accuracy and precision.
    • Recognize the importance of OSHA Guidelines and standard precautions with an emphasis on safety and biohazard infectious waste desposal procedures.
    • Instruct patients in the collection of the following specimens
      • Urine (Void, MSCC, 24-hour)
      • Throat
      • Wound
      • Fasting specimens
      • Fecal specimens (Occult blood, Ova and Parasites, Bacteriology culture)
    • Collect the following specimen
      • Urine specimen
      • Venipuncture
      • Capillary puncture
      • Bacteriology specimen
    • Perform the following testing
      • Urinalysis
      • Hemoglobin
      • Micro-hematocrit
      • Chemistry
      • Immunology studies
      • Stool tests
    • Describe the function and care of each part of the microscope
    • Evaluate tests results and demonstrate an understanding of normal and abnormal ranges
    • Discuss the procedure and importance of recording of lab results in patient’s chart
    • Determine follow-up procedures for lab results (panic values, etc.)
    • Discuss the procedures for risk management such as material safety data sheets (MSDS), biohazard labeling and appropriate storage of chemicals
    • Determine follow-up procedures for lab results (panic values, etc.)
    • Perform proper technique when operating medical equipment for CLIA waived diagnostic testing, ECGs, and spirometry in a medical office


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    MEDA 214 Disease Conditions and Community Health

    5 credits
    An overview of the disease processes of major conditions, including infectious diseases, major neoplastic conditions, and major congenital diseases. The focus is on human diseases that are first diagnosed in the clinical setting. Community health and preventative patient education will also be presented.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175  

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss disease conditions, their causes, prognosis, and treatment as they relate to the body systems
    • Identify cardinal symptoms
    • Discuss various diagnostic measures and laboratory tests used in the diagnosis of these disease conditions
    • Utilize various instructional methods for patients’ education in awareness of risk factors associated with certain disease conditions
    • Identify various needs of patients with altered body images


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MEDA 254 Advanced Medical Coding

    5 credits
    Students will develop advanced skills in the use of the Physician’s Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and HCPCS coding system in ambulatory and inpatient healthcare settings.

    Prerequisites: MEDA 140 , MEDA 154 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply knowledge of advanced insurance terminology, phrases, and abbreviations
    • Correctly fill out HCFA billing forms
    • Work effectively as a team member in the medical office setting


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MEDA 293 Medical Assisting Externship Seminar

    1 credit
    Discussion, problem-solving, and evaluation of experience gained in externship.Development of professional communication skills, resume, and job seeking strategies.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Corequisites: MEDA 294 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    At the completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply new clinical and administrative techniques
    • Discuss issues and problems encountered in the clinical/laboratory setting
    • Problem-solve within a group
    • Apply knowledge of lifespan psychology to various age groups
    • Display professional demeanor and behaviors that allow them to communicate effectively in the healthcare setting


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10
  
  •  

    MEDA 294 Medical Assistant Externship

    6 credits
    A supervised clinical work experience for a total of 180 hours, in an outpatient ambulatory facility that provides an opportunity to apply administrative and clinical skills in the role of a medical assistant.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Corequisites: MEDA 293 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Become registered as a Healthcare Assistant in Washington State
    • Explore new knowledge and share new methods and/or techniques in offices
    • Apply communications skills specifically directed toward a medical office in the role of a professional medical assistant
    • Exhibit desirable personality traits, interpersonal relationships and attitudes within the medical office
    • Practice professional demeanor and behaviors to function effectively as a team member in a healthcare setting


    Total Hours: 180 Practicum or Internship Hours: 180
  
  •  

    MEDA 296 Certified Medical Assistant Review

    2 credits
    This course is designed to review the entire Medical Assisting program in preparation for the national CMA examination.

    Prerequisites: MEDA 115 , MEDA 129 , MEDA 211 , MEDA 125 , MEDA 212 , MEDA 214  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Review and apply knowledge in the  General Areas of Medical Assisting
      • Medical Terminology
      • Human Anatomy and Physiology
      • Professional Communication
      • Medical Law and Ethics
    • Review and apply knowledge in the Administrative Areas of Medical Assisting
      • Medical Secretarial Receptionist Skills
      • Bookkeeping and Accounting
      • Medical Insurances
      • Billing and Collections
      • Management
    • Review and apply knowledge in the Clinical Areas of Medical Assisting
      • Infection Control
      • Preparing Patient and Assisting Physician
      • Laboratory Procedures
      • Pharmacology/Medication Administration
      • First Aid/ CPR


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20

Nursing

  
  •  

    NURS 107 Nursing Assistant Theory

    5 credits
    This course will introduce students to the role, responsibilities, and skills required of a nursing assistant. The students will be introduced to health care concepts including scientific principles of nursing, basic therapeutic communication techniques, infection and infection control, vital sign measurement, safety and mobility issues, basic patient care, patient comfort, and nutrition.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Corequisites: NURS 108  and NURS 109 

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the role of the nursing assistant in healthcare
    • Identify consumer rights and responsibilities
    • Describe ethical and legal issues specific to the Nursing Assistant role in health care
    • Distinguish appropriate therapeutic communication vs informal conversation
    • Demonstrate appropriate observation, reporting and documentation skills
    • Identify and select appropriate infection control procedures
    • Recognize concepts and rationales, then assess results of proper measurement of vital signs, height and weight
    • Identify and examine the concepts of safe care in the long-term care setting
    • Describe concepts of safe positioning, transferring and ambulation of patient
    • Describe proper body mechanics
    • Identify nutritional considerations
    • Describe death and dying issues
    • Identify employment opportunities, and career growth and continuing education
    • Describe basic first aid procedures, and respond appropriately in emergency situations
    • Describe care surrounding an emotionally stressed patient
    • Write a reflection paper explaining and justifying responses to identified problems with accompanying solutions at three different levels


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    NURS 108 Nursing Assistant Lab

    3 credits
    This course will give students an opportunity to integrate Nursing Assistant theory into practice while in a lab environment. Students will practice and demonstrate an understanding of the skills necessary to provide safe care to the health care client. These skills include: infection control, vital sign measurement, safe transfer, ambulation and positioning and feeding patients. In addition the students will practice documenting, reporting and communication skills.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Corequisites: NURS 107  and NURS 109 

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate ability to perform personal care for one client
    • Differentiate use of correct verbal and nonverbal language related to diverse cultural belief systems
    • Practice therapeutic communication
    • Demonstrate correct infection control procedures
    • Demonstrate accurate observation, reporting, and documentation skills
    • Practice proper measurement of vital signs, height and weight
    • Identify abnormal vital signs and weight changes
    • Demonstrate use of specific muscle groups to assist client with activities of daily living to avoid personal and client injury


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    NURS 109 Nursing Assistant Practicum

    3 credits
    This course will give students an opportunity to integrate the learning from Nursing Assistant Theory and Lab skills into the clinical environment caring for healthcare clients. Students will demonstrate safe client care through performance of nursing assistant skills in a healthcare environment. These skills include: infection control, vital sign measurement, safe transfer, ambulation and positioning and feeding patients. In addition the students will demonstrate accurate documenting, reporting and communication skills.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Corequisites: NURS 107  and NURS 108 

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform personal care for at least one client
    • Perform therapeutic communication with a culturally diverse population
    • Perform appropriate infection control procedures
    • Perform observation, reporting, and documentation skills
    • Perform proper and accurate measurement of vital signs, height and weight for the long term care client population
    • Perform proper body mechanics
    • Perform appropriate response to emergency situations
    • Perform beginning documentation of care
    • Identify Patient Care Plan and implement procedures as delegated by the supervising nurse


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    NURS 110 Introduction to Pathophysiology

    3 credits
    This is an introductory course in the use of critical thinking, the understanding of scientific knowledge, and the application of the nursing process to the physiological response in health disturbances.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Use Pathophysiology to understanding patient care for clients with physiologic disturbances
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Identify and discuss risk factors, etiologies, and elements of pathophysiology of regulation/control, oxygenation/circulation, elimination/nutrition, and protection/defenses
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Using appropriate medical terminology, explain aspects of pathophysiology, in stable situations with predictable outcomes
      • Use information technology to obtain information in regard to Pathophysiology problems identified (GO: Information Technology)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Differentiate between normal physiologic and pathophysiologic process
      • Use critical thinking skills to identify risk factors/behaviors that lead to alterations in health (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Recognize critical Pathophysiology states that would require immediate intervention
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Communicate effectively with other health care team members regarding Pathophysiology problems identified and share the outcome of the communication with patient and patient family in a compassionate manner taking into consideration patient cultural background (GO: Communication)


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    NURS 111 Nursing Foundations

    4 credits


    Introductory course in the fundamentals of nursing care focused to foster global and cultural awareness. Provides theoretical background and introduces the nursing process emphasizing the role of the RN.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Corequisites: NURS 112 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN (Quality and Safety Education for Nurses: QSEN - Patient Centered Care & Evidence Based Care)(Global Outcomes: GO - Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Understand holistic care (Global Outcomes: Intercultural Appreciation) (QSEN - Patient Centered Care, Evidence Based Care)
      • Identify populations (GO - Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Identify the members of the health care team and describe their respective roles (GO - Teamwork) (QSEN- teamwork & collaboration)
      • Understand the basic legal and ethical elements of documentation, confidentiality and patient rights that govern the role of the nurse (GO - Information Literacy) (QSEN - Safety & Informatics)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with diverse patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes (GO - Communication & Intercultural Appreciation & Teamwork)(QSEN - Patient Centered Care & Teamwork and Collaboration)
      • Identify the components of individualized patient teaching  (GO - Critical Thinking)(QSEN - Patient Centered Care)
      • Analyze the nursing process (GO - Critical Thinking)(QSEN - Patient Centered Care)
      • Evaluate the concept of patient centered care (QSEN - Patient Centered Care)
    • Apply the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies (QSEN - Safety)(GO - Critical Thinking)
      • Evaluate information management systems and resources related to evidence based practice (QSEN - Informatics & Evidence Based Practice)(GO- Information Literacy)
      • Explore the role of the nurse in a variety of settings
    • Apply clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status (QSEN - Safety)(GO - Critical Thinking)
      • Identity subjective and objective data collection tools and processes (QSEN - Patient Centered Care & Informatics)(GO - Critical Thinking & Information Literacy)
      • Evaluate nursing theory and the progression of ‘nursing’ clinical reasoning skills (QSEN - Quality Improvement)
      • Apply ‘Maslow’s Hierarchy of Need’ when prioritizing care (GO - Critical Thinking) (QSEN- Patient Centered Care)
    • Demonstrate leadership skills to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community (GO - Teamwork, Critical Thinking)(QSEN - Teamwork & Collaboration)
      • Demonstrate professional nursing behaviors (GO - Teamwork, Critical Thinking)(QSEN - Teamwork & Collaboration)
      • Commit to using knowledge of technical and information literacy to maintain a high level of professional competency during professional life (GO- Information Literacy) (QSEN - Informatics & Quality Improvement)


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40

  
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    NURS 112 Nursing Foundations Practicum

    2 credits
    This course allows the student to apply introductory critical thinking skills, observe the nursing process, practice communication techniques, and demonstrate basic nursing skills in a long-term care setting.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Corequisites: NURS 111 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Demonstrate the beginning development of a caring ethical and holistic view in client care situations (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care and promotion and functional patient outcomes
      • Utilize therapeutic communications when interacting with individual clients and significant support person(s) (GO: Communication; QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration)
      • Demonstrate effective communication when reporting and documenting basic nursing care activities (GO: Communication)
      • Utilize effective communications with health care team members in the coordination of care (GO: Communication, Teamwork; QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Apply understanding of professional role behaviors to various clinical situations (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Develop an awareness of critical thinking and the nursing process as the starting point for providing care (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate basic interpersonal skills needed to work cooperatively and collaboratively with members of the health care team (GO: Communication, Teamwork; QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration)
      • Demonstrate beginning practices that adhere to legal, ethical, and regulatory standards for the practical nurse (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice, Safety)


    Total Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    NURS 113 Health Assessment and Promotion

    2 credits
    This course is an introduction to the concepts of health promotion throughout the life span as a basis for performing a total client assessment. Critical thinking skills and cultural needs are included. Combined lecture and laboratory practice on a well adult.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Properly perform a systematic physical examination (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Organize and document subjective and objective data in an efficient, legible, and complete manner (GO: Communication, QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Conduct a physical exam using safe techniques and time management (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Safety)
      • Use medical equipment correctly (GO: Information Literacy, QSEN: Safety)
      • Use correct medical terminology to describe normal and abnormal findings (GO: Communication)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Interview clients effectively using the questions associated with a complete review of systems (GO: Communication, QSEN:  Patient Centered Care)
      • Use active listening skills and body language conducive to open and clear communication with clients and colleagues (GO: Communication)
      • Maintain a high degree of role competency through the use of self-directed learning and self-assessment (QSEN: Safety)
      • Exercise diplomacy, appropriate behavior, and accountability in all actions and relationships with peers and clients (GO: Communication, Intercultural Appreciation, QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Demonstrate sensitivity to and respect for diversity (GO: Intercultural Appreciation, QSEN-Pt. centered care)
      • Identify variances in a health assessment and design appropriate follow up actions (GO: Critical Thinking, QSEN: Pt. centered care)
      • Find and use a variety of reliable resources as a basis for projects and actions (GO: Information Literacy, QSEN: Evidence-based Practice)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Apply key steps in diagnostic reasoning (GO: Critical thinking, QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    NURS 116 Communication Processes in Nursing

    2 credits
    This course is an introduction to the principles of therapeutic communication and techniques for use with clients, families, and co-workers. Students identify patterns of communication and explore common barriers to safe and effective communication.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Explain the fundamentals of the Nurse-Client relationship (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Maintain a therapeutic Nurse-Client relationship (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate therapeutic communication to facilitate one’s own adaptation to new environments (GO: Communication)
      • Develop and implement therapeutic relationships with clients and collaborative relationships with members of the individual’s interdisciplinary health team while caring for diverse clients (QSEN: Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration) (GO: Communication, Teamwork, and Intercultural Communication)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Demonstrate the ability to communicate about sensitive subjects with individuals and families while acting as a health care team member (QSEN - Patient Centered Care) (GO: Communication)
      • Apply learned communication techniques with healthcare team members to promote teamwork (QSEN: Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration, Patient Centered Care) (GO: Communication and Teamwork)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Communicate effectively with special-needs clients while applying scientific knowledge in the nursing process to promote health and wellness (QSEN: Informatics) (GO: Technology and Information Management)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Apply learned communication techniques in professional relationships to promote teamwork (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration) (GO: Communication and Teamwork)
      • Demonstrate the ability to communicate about sensitive subjects with individuals and families while acting as a health care team member (QSEN: Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration) (GO: Communication and Teamwork)
      • Use critical thinking to determine appropriate communication strategies for clients and their families QSEN: PCC and EBP) (GO: Communication, Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Describe the ethical and legal issues relevant to confidentiality in communication (QSEN: Safety and Quality Improvement)


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    NURS 117 Skills Lab I

    2 credits
    This course is an introduction to the principles of therapeutic communication and techniques for use with clients, families, and co-workers. Students identify patterns of communication and explore common barriers to safe and effective communication.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Demonstrate basic nursing skills needed to provide safe and effective nursing care: surgical asepsis, oxygen therapy, wound care, medication administration (QSEN: patent centered care) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Incorporate assessment skills and recognition of homeostasis changes in providing skilled nursing care activities (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Use the nursing process as the basis for providing care and troubleshooting (QSEN Patient Centered Care) (GO: Critical thinking)
      • Demonstrate respect for patient privacy, confidentiality, and autonomy (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care and promotion and functional patient outcomes
      • Demonstrate the use of effective communication in establishing the client nurse relationship (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO Communication)
      • Use appropriate terminology and effective communication skills in communicating with health care team members, care givers, and families (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Identify appropriate various infection control precautions (QSEN: Safety, EBP)
      • Maintain appropriate infection control measures in nursing care activities (QSEN: Safety, EBP) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Demonstrate safe handling of oxygen, infectious waste, medication delivery devices, and sterile fields. (QSEN: Safety, EBP) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Use proper body mechanics in medication administration and wound care QSEN: Safety, EBP) (GO:  Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Recognize and respond appropriately to clients experiencing adverse effects from oxygen therapy, wound care, medication and enemas (QSEN: Safety) (GO: Communication)
      • Use critical thinking in all decision making related to providing care and skills performance (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate ability to work cooperatively with health care team members to provide safe and effective nursing care (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Use technical and information resources to enhance communication and support effective teamwork ( QSEN: Informatics) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Discuss the role of the Nurse, LPN and RN in patient care decision making, implementation, and evaluation (QSEN: Communication)


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    NURS 121 Medical-surgical Nursing I

    4 credits
    The first of two courses presenting nursing care as it relates to common disturbances of homeostasis. Critical thinking skills and cultural needs of the client are introduced. Students utilize a systems approach to patient care.

    Prerequisites: NURS 111 , NURS 112 .

    Corequisites: NURS 122 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care and promotion and functional patient outcomes
      • Use proper medical terminology in communicating verbal and written information to health care team  (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Communication)
      • Describe common disease processes (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Recognize effective communication techniques that promote client and family involvement (QSEN: Safety) (GO: Communication)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Identify key assessment data for specific disorders (Go: Communication)
      • Recognize manifestations of common disease processes(GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Identify appropriate nursing actions based on available assessment data and specific disorders(QSEN: Evidence-based Practice)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Describe the nurse role and responsibility in regards to legal and ethical considerations in client and family care (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate an understanding of leadership and advocacy traits that promote work place, client, and family wellbeing (GO: Teamwork)


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
  •  

    NURS 122 Medical-surgical Nursing I Practicum

    5 credits
    This course offers the opportunity for the student to continue to apply and expand nursing skills, critical thinking skills, and communication skills in an acute care setting.

    Prerequisites: NURS 111 , NURS 112 .

    Corequisites: NURS 121 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Describe common signs and symptoms of medical and surgical disorders in the clinical setting
      • List scientific principles underlying medical and nursing treatment of medical-surgical illness for an assigned client (QSEN: EBP, Safety)
      • Perform basic nursing skills and interventions consistent with established nursing standards and plan of care (QSEN: EBP) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Demonstrate understanding of the pharmacologic treatment approaches in the care an assigned client (QSEN: EBP)
      • Describe how principles of caring; ethical responsibility, and respect for human dignity are integrated into nursing care practices (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate accountability consistent with ethical and legal responsibilities of practical nursing
      • Demonstrate beginning client teaching strategies that foster holistic health promotion and illness prevention (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care and promotion and functional patient outcomes
      • Recognize how cultural, socioeconomic, and spiritual influences affect the client’s level of wellness (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Utilize technical and communication skills to obtain and record baseline data (QSEN: Informatics) (GO: Information Literacy, Communication)
      • Demonstrate basic communication skills when interacting with individual clients and significant support person(s) (GO: Communication)
      • Utilize appropriate communication channels and strategies in collaborating with the health care team to deliver care (GO: Communication)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Identify appropriate nursing problems for assigned client (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate developing organizational skills related to prioritization; time-management and follow through in the delivery of care (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Utilize accurate nursing judgment in the preparation, safe administration, and recording of medications to an assigned client (QSEN: Safety) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Evaluate goals for appropriateness and discuss in a small group process
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Demonstrate underlying nursing knowledge in setting individualized clinical goals
      • Utilize critical thinking to apply theoretical knowledge in providing direct care to one adult client (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Apply critical thinking and communication skills to client care, staff interactions, care development, and self-evaluation (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Safety)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate understanding of the role of the nurse in the delivery of care in a multidisciplinary setting  (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration, Safety) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Demonstrate interpersonal skills that facilitate teamwork (GO Teamwork)
      • Demonstrate an understanding of facility-specific informational systems and the impact of those systems on the delivery of care (QSEN: Informatics) (GO: Information Literacy) 


    Total Hours: 100 Lab or Clinical Hours: 100
  
  •  

    NURS 128 Skills Lab II

    2 credits
    This is the second of a two course series introducing the nursing student to the process and rationale of nursing skills and procedures. It includes didactic instruction and supervised practice of intermediate nursing skills in a laboratory environment.

    Prerequisites: NURS 117 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Demonstrate respect for patient privacy, confidentiality, and autonomy (QSEN-Patient Centered Care)
      • Articulate medical legal elements of documentation (QSEN: Safety & Quality)
      • Use proper body mechanics in all nursing care activities (QSEN: Safety)
      • Understand the role of the RN regarding technical aspects of practice
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Use effective communication in establishing the client nurse relationship (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Communication)
      • Effectively communicate clinical rationale for treatment to educate the patient regarding benefits & risks of treatment (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Safety, Critical Thinking) (GO: Communication)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Demonstrate intermediate nursing skills needed to provide safe and effective nursing care (QSEN: Safety, Evidence-based Practice, Quality)
      • Maintain appropriate infection control measures in all nursing care activities  (QSEN: Safety, Evidence-based Practice, Quality)
      • Demonstrate safe handling of all medical equipment (QSEN: Safety)
      • Demonstrate safe medication dosing & calculation  (QSEN: Safety, Quality)
      • Apply critical thinking in all decision making processes (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Incorporate assessment skills in implementing & evaluating the effects of nursing care activities  (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Expand on the role of the RN in patient care decision making, implementation and evaluation  (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Work cooperatively with health care team members to provide safe and effective nursing care (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    NURS 129 Gerontological Nursing

    2 credits
    A course introducing the nursing student to concepts and processes of assessment, care and health promotion for the older adult. Students will explore the nurse role as change agent in the planning and delivery of care in the older adult.

    Prerequisites: NURS 111  NURS 112 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Recognize individual diversity and unique needs in establishing teaching strategies, focused client health, and wellness promotion (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO:  Intercultural Appreciation, Communication, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Explain and discuss healthy aging, gerontological nursing history, education, and nursing roles in gerontology (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO:  Intercultural Appreciation, Communication, Critical Thinking)
      • Compare and contrast differences in culture, aging, and communication with the older adult (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO:  Intercultural Appreciation, Communication, Critical Thinking)
      • Identify the changes in the aging process with respect to the physical, psychological, cognitive, and social aspects of aging (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO:  Intercultural Appreciation, Communication, Critical Thinking)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Discuss promoting health, using Gerontological assessment tools, and medication management (QSEN: Informatics, Evidence-based Practice, Patient Centered Care)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Explain aging in coping with chronic disorders, in caring for older adults and their caregivers and continuity of care (QSEN- safety, teamwork and collaboration) (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with the elderly patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    NURS 131 Medical Surgical Nursing II

    4 credits
    This course introduces common disturbances of homeostasis across the adult life span. Students continue to build on knowledge gained in prerequisite course work in developing an understanding of disease processes and the role of the nurse in the care of clients with altered functioning related to disease processes.

    Prerequisites: NURS 121 , NURS 122 .

    Corequisites: NURS 132 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Identify holistic elements of care for focused medical surgical disorders including self care, prevention, and patient / nurse safety measures (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice, Safety, Quality)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Utilize information technology resources to access literature and appropriate patient teaching aids (QSEN: Infomatics, Patient Centered Care) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Identify key educational elements to present to patients related to focused disease processes  (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Recognize effective communication techniques that promote client and family involvement (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Communication)
      • Recognize learning deficits related to specific disorders and understand the need to incorporate them into individualized patient teaching plans (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Recognize manifestations of common disease processes when gathering assessment data for specific disorders (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Identify key assessment data necessary for assisting in the establishment of the nursing diagnoses for individuals with specific disorders (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Recognize specific actions to implement for both acute & emergent care and evaluate outcomes as related to focused systems (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Quality, Safety, Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Demonstrates an ability to integrate core pathophysiology and pharmacology with specific disease etiology of common medical surgical processes focused on the muscular/skeletal, neurological, immune, hematological, reproductive, and integumentory systems (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Quality) (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Identify the leadership role of the RN as care coordinator, health promoter, and collaborator with the healthcare team (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork) 


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
  •  

    NURS 132 Medical-surgical Nursing II Practicum

    5 credits
    In this course the student continues to expand and integrate critical thinking skills, knowledge of the nursing process, communication techniques, and technical skills in an acute care setting.

    Prerequisites: NURS 121 , NURS 122 .

    Corequisites: NURS 131 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Evaluate principles underlying the medical and nursing treatment of single system and multi-system medical-surgical illnesses to develop solutions that ensure safe effective care in stable and predictable situations.(Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN): Safety & Quality Improvement)
      • Apply nursing skills and interventions that are consistent with established nursing standards and the individual plan of care (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice (EBP))
      • Understand and create patterns of practice which integrate the principles of caring, ethical responsibility, and respect for human dignity (QSEN:  Patient Centered Care)
      • Analyze and apply technical and communication skills to obtain, organize, and record data (QSEN:  Informatics)(Global Outcomes (GO): Information Literacy & Communication)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care and promotion and functional patient outcomes
      • Apply accepted nursing strategies that are consistent with the cultural, socioeconomic and spiritual influences of the client (QSEN: Patient Centered Care & Evidence-based Practice (EBP)) (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Utilize therapeutic communication skills that emphasize information literacy and cultural sensitivity when interacting with clients and significant support person(s) (QSEN: Informatics) (Global Outcome (GO): Intercultural Appreciation & Information Literacy)
      • Evaluate and utilize appropriate communication systems and strategies in collaborating with the health care team to assist in the management of individual client care. (QSEN:  Teamwork and Collaboration)(GO: Communication)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Understand and demonstrate accountability for personal actions that is consistent with ethical and legal responsibilities of nursing (QSEN: Patient -centered Care & Safety) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Apply client teaching strategies that emphasize information literacy, cultural awareness and holistic health promotion (QSEN: Informatics)(GO: Information Literacy, & Intercultural Appreciation)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Analyze and assemble accurate data to identify both normal and abnormal findings, to care for the individual in a structured setting  (QSEN: Evidence-based Care & Quality Improvement) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Create a systems approach to understand and apply pharmacologic interventions in the treatment of medical-surgical disturbances in a relatively stable situation (QSEN: Safety & Informatics)(GO: Critical Thinking & Information Literacy)
      • Understand and demonstrate accurate nursing judgment in the preparation, safe administration, and recording of medications for multiple clients (QSEN: Safety) (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Apply the organizational skills needed to deliver nursing care to multiple clients (QSEN: Safety & Teamwork and Collaboration)(GO: Critical Thinking & Teamwork)
      • Apply interpersonal skills which show collaboration with healthcare team members QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration)(GO: Communication & Teamwork)


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 100
  
  •  

    NURS 134 Introduction to Pharmacology

    3 credits
    A systems approach is utilized as it relates to pharmacological interventions by the nurse. There is an emphasis on client information literacy, cultural awareness, and issues involving non-compliance with therapies.

    Prerequisites: NURS 111 , NURS 112 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Apply legal and ethical standards related to the administration of prescribed medications (QSEN: Safety)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Initiate client teaching regarding medications that demonstrates cultural awareness  (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Intercultural Awareness)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence- based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Use information technology to access current, reliable information regarding medications ordered (QSEN: Informatics) (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Describe the basic mechanisms of drug metabolism in the body including absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion and how these are affected by human diversity (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Identify the mechanisms of action, adverse effects, and the nursing implications in administration of the major classifications of drugs including those affecting:
        • Regulation and control
        • Oxygenation and circulation
        • Elimination and nutrition
        • Protection and defenses (GO: Information Literacy)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Use critical thinking to determine effective nursing actions and communicate with other members of the health care team in relationship to clients’ responses to drugs (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration) (GO: Communication, Teamwork, Critical Thinking)


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    NURS 135 Mental Health Nursing

    3 credits
    Introduces concepts relating to emotional, mental, and behavioral disturbances and disorders of clients. Emphasizes basic concepts including legal and ethical principles related to mental health and illness, and the role and responsibilities of the nurse in the chronic and acute mental health care setting.

    Prerequisites: NURS 121 , NURS 122 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Recognize the components for an environment supporting a therapeutic and safe milieu for self, colleagues and the mental health consumer (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Cafety)
      • Describe the historical, cultural, sociological, and political influences on contemporary mental health nursing
      • Describe the major psychological and nursing theoretical frameworks
      • Recognize key legal and ethical principles in caring for a consumer of mental health care
      • Recognize professional boundaries and risk factors for boundary crossing (QSEN: Patient Centered Pare, Safety)
      • Recognize beneficial self-care practices for maintenance of own emotional wellbeing
      • Identify the respective roles and responsibilities of the interdisciplinary team in the mental health setting (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Identify the components of a therapeutic psychosocial nurse-client relationship in a structured environment  (QSEN: communication)
      • Discuss strategies for safe management of crisis situations that occur in various treatment settings incorporating principles of therapeutic communication and patient psychopathology (QSEN: Safety)
      • Identify critical patient teaching needs associated with the use of commonly prescribed psychotropic medications (GO: Communication, Critical Thinking)
      • Identify the roles and responsibilities of the RN in contributing to primary prevention strategies   
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence- based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Recognize potential contributing factors in the development of mental health disorders
      • Identify standard assessment parameters and tools used in the diagnosis of acute and chronic psychiatric disturbances
      • Establish a care plan based on the priority needs of a mental health consumer
      • Describe therapeutic nursing interventions for working with individuals who are experiencing acute and chronic psychiatric disturbances
      • Recognize evidence based nursing care strategies that protect the rights and dignity of this vulnerable population (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) ( GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Discuss the issues and needs related to selected age-related populations, those with a dual diagnosis and those with special needs (QSEN: patient centered care) (GO: intercultural appreciation)
      • Recognize coping mechanisms both adaptive and maladaptive used by patients experiencing a severe and persistent psychiatric disorder
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Identify typical signs and symptoms characteristic of the following mental health disorders (Anxiety, Mood, Psychosis, Eating, Substance abuse, Personality and Cognitive)
      • Recognize potential signs of an impending behavioral crisis (GO critical thinking. QSEN Safety)
      • Recognize the indications and potential side effects associated with commonly used psychotropic medications (QSEN: Safety)
      • Prioritize care strategies for patients experiencing co-morbid health states (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Recognize patient potential for violence including suicide and homicide (QSEN: Safety)
      • Critically analyze research literature to benefit an evidence based practice nursing approach (QSEN: Informatics, Evidence-based Practice) (GO: Information Literacy)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate awareness of the available mental health community resources including but not limited to partial hospitalization programs, PACT program, rehabilitation settings, crisis clinic hotline and support groups (QSEN: Collaboration and Teamwork)
      • Describe levels of prevention under the public health model and the role of the RN at each level (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Recognize an evidence based practice care plan related to mental health promotion and illness prevention specific to the needs of diverse communities (QSEN: Evidence-Based Practice) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Describe the historical, cultural, sociological, and political influences on contemporary mental health nursing (including but not limited to societal stigma, and disparity of resources)
      • Describe the major psychological and nursing theoretical frameworks


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    NURS 139 Mental Health Nursing Practicum

    3 credits
    This course covers care for individuals with psychiatric disturbances and their families in acute care, outpatient, and community mental health care settings with clients manifesting complex neurophysiological and psychosocial disturbances.

    Prerequisites: NURS 121 , NURS 122 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Maintain professional boundaries (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Safety)
      • Contribute to a safe, therapeutic milieu (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Safety)
      • Utilize strategies that support the nurse’s role as client advocate across the continuum of care (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate professional behavior and accountability consistent with ethical, legal principles and facility policies and procedures
      • Discuss the role of the nurse in coordinating multidisciplinary treatment modalities in the delivery of care in a mental health setting
      • Demonstrate responsibility and self-direction in pursuing short-term and long-term opportunities for learning
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Identify, discuss and under supervision (when applicable) demonstrate client teaching strategies that emphasize cultural awareness, and holistic health promotion
      • Utilize appropriate communication systems and techniques in collaborating with the health care team to manage client care and promote the treatment plan
      • Demonstrate therapeutic; client centered communication while providing client care (QSEN: Teamwork, Collaboration)  (GO: Communication)
      • Role model practice patterns that reflect caring, ethical responsibility, and respect for human dignity (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate technical and information literacy researching the internet to identify educational and client resources (QSEN: Informatics) (GO: Information Literacy)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Prepare a mental health nursing care plan with measurable, realistic behavioral goals based on identified actual and potential client problems, with a focus on priority needs
      • Integrate cultural awareness and diversity into the client care plan
      • Integrate underlying knowledge of systems and scientific principles in setting client goals (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice)
      • Demonstrate nursing strategies that are consistent with the cultural, socioeconomic, and spiritual influences on the client’s level of wellness (GO: Intercultural Awareness)
      • Perform basic and intermediate nursing skills and interventions consistent with established nursing standards and plan of care in the mental health setting
      • Prepare written documentation using professional and legal language, following facility policies and procedures
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Utilize critical thinking to apply the nursing process and theoretical knowledge in providing direct care to clients (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Recognize potential signs of an impending behavioral crisis (QSEN: Safety) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Recognize and respond appropriately per facility policies to risk factors and signs of impending violence to others or self (client) (QSEN: Safety)
      • Recognize the indications and potential side effects associated with commonly used psychotropic medications (QSEN: Safety)
      • Utilize scientific rationale and a systems approach in assessment, goal development, and the evaluation of nursing interventions (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice, Informatics, QI)
      • Utilize a systems approach to apply understanding of multidisciplinary interventions (including psychopharmacological and communication approaches) in the treatment of mental health disorder (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice) (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate awareness of community resources including, but not limited to, Partial Hospitalization programs, social services, PACT, crisis clinic hotline, rehabilitation settings, and support groups (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration)                                                                                                                    


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    NURS 221 Nursing & the Childbearing Family

    3 credits
    This course focuses on normal growth and development and nursing needs of the child-bearing family from pre-conception through infancy while presenting a holistic approach to the culturally diverse families. Nursing care related to other aspects of the reproductive system (STDs, Family Planning) is also included.

    Prerequisites: NURS 131 , NURS 132 .

    Corequisites: NURS 222 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Describe the evolution, scope, and professional roles of maternal and child health in nursing
      • Integrate knowledge of trends in maternal and child healthcare with the nursing process to achieve an understanding of quality nursing care (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice)
      • Identify characteristics of the full term newborn (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Identify changes that may occur in family dynamics as a result of the birth of a child(QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Use knowledge of diverse cultures to effectively manage care in the childbearing family (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care and promotion and functional patient outcomes
      • Describe the impact that cultural diversity has on family structure, function, and family roles (GO: Communication)
      • Describe family structure and health (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidenced based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Use information technology to formulate nursing diagnoses related to family health (QSEN: Informatics) (GO: Information Technology)
      • Formulate nursing diagnoses related to health care teaching appropriate for the childbearing family (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Use critical thinking to identify areas of care that could benefit from nursing research (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Use critical thinking to analyze ways that a client’s reproductive and sexual health can be improved for healthier child bearing and adult health (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Describe complications of pregnancy that place a pregnant woman and her fetus at high risk (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Identify nursing actions related to care of the high risk pregnant woman and the high risk newborn (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate increased self-motivation in seeking new learning experiences


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    NURS 222 Nursing & the Childbearing Family Practicum

    3 credits
    Registered Nurse student care experience with mothers, newborns, and families. Students acquire cultural awareness and information literacy pertaining to the new family unit.

    Prerequisites: NURS 131 , NURS 132 .

    Corequisites: NURS 221 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Describe the scope and advancement of the RN role in maternal and child nursing
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care and promotion and functional patient outcomes
      • Recognize factors that place a pregnant woman and her fetus at high risk for complications
      • Provide education to assist the diverse family with adapting to changes (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
      • State nursing diagnoses related to health care teaching appropriate for the childbearing family (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence- based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Develop nursing interventions appropriate to findings and diagnosis (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Develop, implement, and evaluate teaching skills to improve client’s reproductive and sexual health (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Use information technology to integrate trends in maternal and child healthcare with the nursing process to achieve quality nursing care (QSEN: Informatics) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Assess a family for structure, function, and family roles in relationship to health, recognizing characteristics that require intervention
      • Formulate nursing diagnoses related to family health (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Apply knowledge of nursing process in the acute care setting to provide competent nursing care to the childbearing family including the high-risk pregnant woman and newborn (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Use assessment skills to gather data regarding the childbearing family and communicate this data to the health care team (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Use critical thinking to identify areas of care that could benefit from nursing research
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate increased self-motivation in seeking out new learning experiences (GO: Teamwork) (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration)


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    NURS 225 Nursing of Children

    3 credits
    This course focuses on the growth and development of the child from birth through adolescence in diverse populations. Major childhood illnesses and community resources for family units discussed.

    Prerequisites: NURS 131 , NURS 132 .

    Corequisites: NURS 226 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN (QSEN: Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration, Patient Centered Care)
      • Provide nursing care to children, their families and community impacted by chronic and/or disabling deviations
      • Identify and provide age- and/or developmentally-appropriate nursing care to pediatric population
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes (QSEN: Quality Improvement, Safety, Patient Centered Care)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies (QSEN: Informatics, Evidence-based Practice, Patient Centered Care)
      • Describe the pathophysiology of selected common acute health deviations in the pediatric population
      • Identify the role of the nurse in assisting families to adapt to influences and changes as a result of adoption, divorce, illness, and children with special needs
      • Design and implement nursing interventions for the pediatric patient that incorporate developmental theories and reflect the developmental stage of the child
      • Design and implement teaching plans appropriate to the developmental and cognitive level of the child/parent that will assist in meeting the health promotion needs of the child
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status (QSEN: Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration)
      • Apply critical thinking to assessment of health, wellness, and protection in children, their families, and their communities and the impact of the sick child on the family and community
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with the patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Teamwork and Collaboration)
      • Discuss the importance of information literacy in supporting the family unit in management of care


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    NURS 226 Nursing of Children Practicum

    3 credits
    This course provides an opportunity for students to apply and expand their critical thinking skills, use of the nursing process, and communications skills while focusing on acutely ill pediatric clients and their families.

    Prerequisites: NURS 131 , NURS 132 .

    Corequisites: NURS 225 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Discuss the nursing implications of growth and development as they relate to providing competent nursing care for the pediatric client (QSEN:  Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration, Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate an understanding of culturally sensitive family centered  nursing care of the pediatric client
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Gather assessment data to assist in formulating nursing diagnoses related to pediatric health, developing the nursing diagnosis, writing the nursing care plan, and implementing nursing action (QSEN: Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration, Patient Centered Care
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with the patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration, and the wider community
      • Evaluate the implementation of nursing actions in providing care for the hospitalized child and the family (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Teamwork and Collaboration)


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    NURS 241 Medical-Surgical Nursing III

    5 credits
    This course teaches advanced nursing theory, and scientific principles emphasizing clients with complex health disturbances across the adult life. Nursing research and evidenced based practice will be introduced, as it pertains to direct client care. Emphasis is on the nurse role in collaborative partnership with all health team members in developing and evaluating effectiveness of client care plan.

    Prerequisites: NURS 221 , NURS 222 , NURS 225 , NURS 226 .

    Corequisites: NURS 242 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Identify and discuss culturally competent care of the patient with complex health needs (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO- Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Develop appropriate, patient specific plans of care for a variety of critically ill patients (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Describe the nurse’s role in continuous quality improvement (QSEN: Quality Improvement)
      • Discuss the nurse’s role as health educator
      • Identify and discuss appropriate communication techniques to ensure effective collaboration with the patient, family members, and interdisciplinary team (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Communication, Teamwork)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Discuss nursing processes surrounding clients with complex health disturbances
      • Research internet resources for evidence based practice guidelines  (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Evaluate web based resources for quality of content (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Explain the relationship between critical thinking and evidence-based practice (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Describe the nurse’s role in the setting of emergency care
      • Describe the unique aspects of the nurse’s role in caring for critically ill clients
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Describe the purpose and process of clinical pathways
      • Apply critical thinking in all decision making processes (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Explain the wellness-illness continuum
      • Demonstrate proficiency in clinical judgment in caring for clients with multiple health disturbances (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Describe the difference between a nursing diagnosis and a collaborative medical problem ( QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Demonstrate effective, professional communication in all nursing activities (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Communication, Teamwork)


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    NURS 242 Medical-Surgical Nursing III Practicum

    5 credits
    This course provides opportunities for students to work in an acute care setting with clients manifesting multi-faceted physiological, mental, and social health disturbances.

    Prerequisites: NURS 221 , NURS 222 , NURS 225 , NURS 226 .

    Corequisites: NURS 241 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Communicate with all patients in a manner that conveys respect and adds value to the therapeutic relationship (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Communication)
      • Model practice patterns that reflect caring, ethical responsibility, and respect for human dignity
      • Demonstrate culturally competent care (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Demonstrate nursing strategies that are consistent with the cultural, socioeconomic, and spiritual influences on the client’s level of wellness (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Utilize a systems approach to apply understanding of multidisciplinary interventions in the treatment of client health disturbances (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration)
      • Demonstrate skill as a health educator (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Initiate and utilize technical and communication strategies to obtain, organize, analyze and record data (QSEN: Informatics)
      • Analyze signs and symptoms of unpredictable/unstable physiologic, mental and social health disturbances to develop appropriate nursing diagnoses (GO: Information and Literacy, Critical Thinking)
      • Utilize advanced clinical knowledge and skills to develop a comprehensive nursing plan of care (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Information Literacy, Critical Thinking)
      • Demonstrate proficiency in the implementation of interventions prescribed by the nursing plan of care(GO: Information Literacy) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Perform all nursing interventions in a safe and effective manner (QSEN: Safety)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Utilize scientific rationale and a systems approach in the evaluation of the nursing interventions (QSEN: Evidence-based practice)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate ability to work within a multidisciplinary healthcare team, and understand the roles and scope of each member (QSEN: Teamwork and collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Utilize strategies that support the nurse’s role as client advocate across the continuum of care
      • Identify patient and family as key leaders within the healthcare team (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Demonstrate a spectrum of organizational skills to effectively deliver care to a caseload of clients
      • Demonstrate responsibility and self-direction in pursuing short-term and long-term opportunities for learning


    Total Hours: 100 Lab or Clinical Hours: 100
  
  •  

    NURS 243 Leadership and Nursing Practice

    3 credits
    This course introduces the nurse student to the legal, ethical, and professional components of nursing. Included in the course is nursing history, growth of nursing, and current trends as applied to clinical and practice areas. Specialty areas within the profession will be presented and discussed. Nurse role as educator and leader, with a special emphasis on culturally competent care is explored.

    Prerequisites: NURS 241 , NURS 242 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Identify the contributions of early nursing leaders & theorists as applied to today’s practice (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice) (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Identify the ethical & legal parameters of RN practice in relation to care elements & documentation (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration, Safety, Quality)
      • Identify the elements of professionalism & their application to nursing practice & personal career
      • Explore the influence of personal & professional values on decision   making
      • Differentiate between the leader/manager’s responsibility to advocate for patients, subordinates, the employer, the profession & oneself
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Describe how principles of leadership and management can be applied in nursing (QSEN: Safety, Quality, Teamwork & Collaboration)
      • Understand the RN scope of practice, including supervision & delegation in nursing leadership (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Identify strategies for effective communication and dealing with intra and interpersonal conflict (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Communication, Teamwork)
      • Discuss change theory and strategies to implement positive change initiatives (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration, Quality Improvement, Evidence-based Practice) (GO: Teamwork)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Describe the nurse’s role in relation to regulatory, fiscal, & organizational issues (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration, Safety, Quality) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Identify current trends in nursing and healthcare (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration, Safety, Quality, Evidence-based Practice)
      • Identify the relationship between nursing process, problem solving & decision making (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Describe the varied roles & practice specialties within nursing
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Identify factors that enhance effectiveness in achieving  organizational, personal, subordinate & client goals (QSEN: Quality, Teamwork & Collaboration, Safety) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Understand quality processes including, data tracking, trends, & root cause analysis (QSEN: Quality, Safety, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics)
      • Compare & contrast delivery of care models for efficiency & effectiveness of care delivery (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Explain the RN role in regards to collaboration with patient, family,  colleagues, the healthcare team, administrators and the community at large (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Identify current trends in nursing & health care


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    NURS 244 Leadership and Nursing Practice Preceptorship

    6 credits
    This course is a clinical preceptorship in a nursing practice setting. The focus is on the student’s ability to integrate delivery of care with teamwork and leadership.

    Prerequisites: NURS 241 , NURS 242 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Assess for and prioritize client teaching needs (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate effective communication skills working with interdisciplinary team members (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Utilize facility specific inter-departmental information systems to support the delivery of quality care (QSEN: Informatics) (GO Information Literacy)
      • Apply the underlying principles of research methodology, and evidence based practice to the patient centered plan of care (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice, QI)
      • Develop client teaching strategies that emphasize cultural awareness, and holistic health promotion and patient centered outcomes (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Critical Thinking )
      • Implement teaching strategies that emphasize cultural awareness, and holistic health promotion and patient centered outcomes (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Evaluate client teaching strategies that emphasize cultural awareness, and holistic health promotion and patient centered outcomes (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Apply the concepts and principles learned in previous nursing courses to implement a patient centered plan of care (QSEN: Safety, Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate effective prioritization of nursing diagnoses and outcomes (QSEN: Safety, Patient Centered Care) (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate the application of nursing process as applied to a leadership role
      • Assume clinical leadership for the nursing care management of a prescribed caseload of clients (QSEN: Teamwork)
      • Demonstrate proficiency in implementing the role of the nurse as a coordinator of multidisciplinary treatment modalities for assigned clients (QSEN: Teamwork) (GO: Teamwork, Communication)
      • Role model professional interpersonal skills which facilitate and advance teamwork (QSEN: Teamwork) ( GO: Teamwork )
      • Demonstrate professional behavior and accountability consistent with ethical, legal and facility responsibilities of nursing (QSEN: Quality Improvement)


    Total Hours: 160 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 150

Nutrition

  
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    NUTR& 101 Nutrition

    5 credits
    This course studies the concepts of nutrition and biochemistry. It also addresses nutrition of different life cycles and diet planning as significant factors of health and wellness.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046 , or ABED 053 , or equivalent placement scores.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be:

    • Recognize the different macronutrients and micronutrients in terms of food sources, functions, requirement & recommendations, and deficiency & toxicity symptoms
    • Examine the anatomy and physiology of all systems involved in digestion including endocrine, urinary, digestive, etc.
    • Investigate current nutrition issues and popular diets
    • Analyze specific foods and/or diets using available computer software as well as correctly interpret the results
    • Predict the changes in nutrition needs during different life cycles, (i.e. pregnancy, infancy, adolescence, etc.)
    • Describe common eating disorders
    • Discuss the issues related to food safety and regulation and be familiar the impact that federal and state/local agencies have on our food supply
    • Assemble the vital components of a healthy diet by understanding the physiological impact macro and micro molecules have in the body and how this relates to health 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Occupational Therapy Assistant

  
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    OTA 101 Conditions in Occupational Therapy

    3 credits
    This course covers basic pathophysiology with emphasis on conditions most frequently observed and treated in physical rehabilitation and occupational therapy. Topics include etiology, pathology, manifestation, treatment, and prognosis of selected body systems.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175 , ENGL& 101 , MEDA 116 , PSYC& 200 , and admission to the OTA Program.

    Corequisites: OTA 101, OTA 112 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the underlying pathophysiology of conditions commonly treated by occupational therapy practitioners
    • Explain the tissue repair process
    • Explain the inflammatory process
    • Identify risk factors and behaviors that lead to alterations in the health of the following body systems: respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, nervous, pulmonary, endocrine, and integumentary
    • Differentiate between normal human physiologic and pathophysiologic processes of the body systems listed above
    • Identify the effects of immobility on the body systems listed above
    • Identify the effects of human aging on the body systems listed above


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    OTA 110 Foundations for Occupational Therapy Assistants

    5 credits
    This course includes an introduction to occupational therapy, basic theory and philosophy, ethics, and areas of OT practice. The student will craft a personal development plan based on the tenets of occupational therapy.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175 , ENGL& 101 , MEDA 116 , PSYC& 200 , and admission to the OTA Program.

    Corequisites: OTA 101 , OTA 112 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    OTA 112 Functional Movement and Kinesiology I

    4 credits
    The two Functional Movement & Kinesiology courses introduce the phenomenon of human motion and function within the context of occupational performance. A review of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems is offered. In the first course the students will analyze human joint motion, identify anatomical landmarks through palpation, and investigate human movement required for daily activities. Client factors, body functions and body structures, related to movement are studied as they affect performance in areas of occupation.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175 , ENGL& 101 , MEDA 116 , PSYC& 200 , and admission to the OTA Program.

    Corequisites: OTA 101 , OTA 112 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe basic principles of muscle physiology and joint range of motion
    • Identify individual muscles with origins and insertions of the upper body
    • Describe nervous system components involved in daily function
    • Identify bone and joint structures of the upper body
    • Recognize skeletal and muscle groups of the lower body
    • Recognize, name, and replicate joint movements of the full body
    • Describe types of muscle contractions used for human activities
    • Demonstrate and describe basic biomechanics used in activities of daily living
    • Measure joint range of motion of the arm and hand
    • Test muscle strength of the shoulder, arm, neck, and hand
    • Recognize gait patterns and posture components
    • Demonstrate competency in identification and palpation of anatomical surface landmarks of the upper extremity, shoulder, neck and head 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    OTA 120 Professional Communication in Healthcare

    3 credits
    This course addresses effective communication and collaboration in today’s healthcare system. Students focus on written and verbal communication skills with emphasis on documentation. The professional opportunities for and the role of the occupational therapy assistant including that of leadership continue to be explored within the scope of practice.

    Prerequisites: OTA 131 , OTA 132 , OTA 140 , and OTA 144 .

    Corequisites: OTA 180 , OTA 211 , and OTA 217 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Communicate appropriately and respectfully with patients of different abilities and challenges
    • Write an effective Subjective/Objective/Assessment/Plan (SOAP) note
    • Describe the supervisory role of the OTR and the unique communication required between the OTA and the OTR
    • Function as a successful team member in OTA practice
    • Follow the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics
    • Behave and dress professionally


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    OTA 131 Human Activity and Occupational Performance

    5 credits
    This course allows students to exam the therapeutic value of purposeful activity. Occupation throughout the lifespan, the teaching & learning process, and activity analysis are explored. Applications of individual and group interventions are applied & examined.

    Prerequisites: OTA 101 , OTA 110 , and OTA 112 .

    Corequisites: OTA 132 , OTA 140 , and OTA 144 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    OTA 132 Functional Movement and Kinesiology II

    3 credits
    The two Functional Movement & Kinesiology courses introduce the phenomenon of human motion and function within the context of occupational performance. The students continue to analyze human motion in the second of the two courses. Students also develop skills in assessment procedures and therapeutic intervention addressing functional movement.

    Prerequisites: OTA 101 , OTA 110 , and OTA 112 .

    Corequisites: OTA 131 , OTA 140 , and OTA 144 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    OTA 140 Pediatrics and Occupational Therapy

    5 credits
    This course examines the causes, courses, and prognoses of conditions and diseases which occur in the span of birth through adolescence. The role of the occupational therapy assistant (OTA) is presented.

    Prerequisites: OTA 101 , OTA 110 , and OTA 112 .

    Corequisites: OTA 131 , OTA 132 , and OTA 144 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Differentiate normal developmental milestones and behaviors from delayed or  abnormal development
    • Identify and describe common conditions and diseases found in the pediatric population, such as  neurological conditions, orthopedic problems, sensory processing difficulties, autism spectrum disorders, mental retardation and other developmental delays, mental health diagnoses, and medical conditions
    • Demonstrate beginning-level competency in common treatment approaches for these conditions appropriate to the occupational therapy assistant
    • Describe three different treatment venues which employ occupational therapy assistants:  medical, community-based, and school system
    • Employ communication techniques appropriate to the client’s developmental level
    • Employ effective communication techniques with the client’s family and support system
    • Apply common theories and interventions used in occupational therapy to the pediatric population, with an emphasis on occupational dysfunction and treatment


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    OTA 144 Fieldwork Level IA with Seminar

    2 credits
    Creating an opportunity for professional growth, three Level I Fieldwork courses are scheduled within the didactic portion of the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program. The Level I Fieldwork experience allows the student to demonstrate professional skills while interacting with clients and other professionals. Students begin to assimilate academic coursework through observation and participation in three placements at various healthcare settings in the community.

    Prerequisites: OTA 101 , OTA 110 , and OTA 112 .

    Corequisites: OTA 131 , OTA 132 , and OTA 140 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 30
  
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    OTA 180 Functional NeuroRehabilitation

    3 credits
    This course covers brain/neurological functioning related to the occupational performance of daily life. Topics include neurocognitive processes, such as orientation, memory, visual perception, executive skills, judgment, and meta-cognition. The treatment and compensatory skills used by the occupational therapy clinician in practice are covered.

    Prerequisites: OTA 131 , OTA 132 , OTA 144 , and OTA 140 .

    Corequisites: OTA 120 , OTA 211 , and OTA 217 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring

  
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    OTA 190 Assistive Technology

    3 credits
    This course provides an introduction to assistive equipment including simple tools, seating and positioning devices, and computer use in therapeutic interventions. These assistive technologies are an important part of the practice of occupational therapy.

    Prerequisites: OTA 120 , OTA 211 , OTA 180 , and OTA 217 .

    Corequisites: OTA 218 , OTA 219 , and OTA 227 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create a piece of assistive equipment that can be used in an OT Clinic
    • Demonstrate the proper use of common assistive equipment used by OTAs
    • Present the different uses of assistive technology in treatment for persons with  physical, cognitive, and/or behavioral problems
    • Research computer applications for persons with disabilities and demonstrate competence in at least one
    • Perform a seating system analysis for a standard wheelchair used by patients; describe the clinical reasoning used to make any recommendation for changes


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    OTA 211 Mental Health and Occupational Therapy

    5 credits
    This course covers adaptations to everyday occupations needed by clients receiving occupational therapy. Assistive equipment, techniques, methods, and environments for a wide variety of client populations are included.

    Prerequisites: OTA 131 , OTA 132 , OTA 144 , and OTA 140 .

    Corequisites: OTA 120 , OTA 180 , and OTA 217 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    OTA 217 Fieldwork Level IB with Seminar

    2 credits
    Creating an opportunity for professional growth, three Level I Fieldwork courses are scheduled within the didactic portion of the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program. The Level I Fieldwork experience allows the student to demonstrate professional skills while interacting with clients and other professionals. Students begin to assimilate academic coursework through observation and participation in three placements at various healthcare settings in the community.

    Prerequisites: OTA 131 , OTA 132 , OTA 140 , and OTA 144 .

    Corequisites: OTA 120 , OTA 180 , and OTA 211 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 30
  
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    OTA 218 Occupational Therapy and Rehabilitation I

    5 credits
    This class provides in depth exposure to common medical conditions, physical disabilities, and the specific interventions and treatments used by the Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA).

    Prerequisites: OTA 120 OTA 211 , OTA 180 , and OTA 217 .

    Corequisites: OTA 190 , OTA 219 , and OTA 227 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify components of occupation-based treatment used with common physical disabilities or diagnoses
    • Demonstrate OTA skills related to the treatments of physical conditions seen by the OTA
    • Analyze case studies of physical disabilities
    • Identify environmental components of occupations which hinder or enhance health in persons with physical disabilities


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    OTA 219 Professional Topics in Occupational Therapy

    3 credits
    This course explores current professional issues in the field of occupational therapy and healthcare. The course addresses advocacy, evidence-based research, clinical reasoning, emerging practice areas, management, global and local healthcare trends as well as health and wellness as it relates to engagement in occupation and occupational therapy.

    Prerequisites: OTA 120 , OTA 211 , OTA 180 , and OTA 217 .

    Corequisites: OTA 190 , OTA 218 , and OTA 227 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    OTA 225 Occupational Therapy and Rehabilitation II

    5 credits
    Provides study in the occupational therapy process as it relates to clients diagnosed with various medical conditions. Medical and physical conditions and the impact of the conditions on occupational performance are studied. Application of theory to treatment planning and interventions to promote engagement in occupations is emphasized.

    Prerequisites: OTA 190 , OTA 218 , OTA 219 , and OTA 227 .

    Corequisites: OTA 226 , and OTA 232 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    OTA 226 Occupational Therapy Assistant Capstone

    5 credits
    Incorporates the knowledge and skill base introduced throughout the Occupational Therapy Assistant program. Reviews, connects, and applies occupational therapy theory, process, domain, scope of practice, professional communication, and the application of therapeutic activities.

    Prerequisites: OTA 190 , OTA 218 , OTA 219 , and OTA 227 .

    Corequisites: OTA 225  and OTA 232 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
 

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