Catalog 2017-2018 
    
    Mar 03, 2021  
Catalog 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Occupational Therapy Assistant

  
  •  

    OTA 227 Occupational Therapy with Older Adults

    2 credits
    Covers the theories of aging, components of healthy aging, common diseases and conditions frequently experienced by older adults, and the context in which aging and occupational dysfunction may occur. The role of the occupational therapy assistant is emphasized, along with the intervention activities and treatments used with the older adult population.

    Prerequisites: OTA 120 , OTA 180 , OTA 211 , and OTA 217 .

    Corequisites: OTA 190 , OTA 218 , and OTA 219 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    OTA 232 Fieldwork Level IC with Seminar

    2 credits
    Creating an opportunity for professional growth, three Level I Fieldwork courses are scheduled within the didactic portion of the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program. The Level I Fieldwork experience allows the student to demonstrate professional skills while interacting with clients and other professionals. Students begin to assimilate academic coursework through observation and participation in three placements at various healthcare settings in the community.

    Prerequisites: OTA 190 , OTA 218 , OTA 219 , and OTA 227 .

    Corequisites: OTA 225  and OTA 226 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 30
  
  •  

    OTA 235 Fieldwork Level IIA

    10 credits
    This course provides the first full-time (40 hour per week) 8-week clinical experience in a community, rehabilitation, medical, or mental health setting under the supervision of an occupational therapist or occupational therapy assistant licensed by the Dept. of Health, State of Washington.

    Prerequisites: OTA 225 , OTA 226 , and OTA 232 .

    Corequisites: OTA 236 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform activities required in an entry-level occupational therapy assistant practice
    • Demonstrate competence in entry-level occupational therapy documentation
    • Demonstrate competence in entry-level occupational therapy assistant oral reporting
    • Behave in a professional manner consistent with occupational therapy code of ethics, Washington State law, and the culture and norms of the clinical setting
    • Articulate the importance of purposeful and meaningful occupation to the health and well-being of actual clients


    Total Hours: 300 Practicum or Internship Hours: 300
  
  •  

    OTA 236 Seminar IIA

    2 credits
    This course covers the practical clinical issues experienced by the OTA students during the first 8 weeks of the quarter. After the successful completion of the 8-week Fieldwork II Experience, students come back to campus for a seminar for directed discussion and sharing based upon actual clinical experiences. Specific course content is dependent upon each student’s unique experience.

    Prerequisites: OTA 225 , OTA 226 , and OTA 232 .

    Corequisites: OTA 235 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course the students will be able to:

    • Define and differentiate between occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant roles in the clinical fieldwork setting
    • Participate in a professional manner in group discussions regarding the effects of disease of disability on real clients, organizations, and populations
    • Define personal challenges and improvements necessary for success in the next Fieldwork II Experience
    • Participate in professional on-line education and communication opportunities


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    OTA 240 Fieldwork Level IIB

    10 credits
    This course provides a second full-time (40 hour per week) 8-week clinical experience in a community, rehabilitation, medical, or mental health setting. The student will practice under the supervision of an occupational therapist or occupational therapy assistant licensed by the State of Washington. This fieldwork assignment will take place in a different clinical practice setting than OTA 235 .

    Prerequisites: OTA 235  and OTA 236 .

    Corequisites: OTA 241 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform activities required in an  entry-level occupational therapy assistant practice
    • Demonstrate competence in entry-level occupational therapy documentation
    • Demonstrate competence in entry-level occupational therapy assistant oral reporting
    • Behave in a professional manner consistent with occupational therapy code of ethics, Washington State law, and the culture and norms of the clinical setting
    • Articulate the importance of purposeful and meaningful occupation to the health and well-being of actual clients


    Total Hours: 300 Practicum or Internship Hours: 300
  
  •  

    OTA 241 Seminar IIB

    2 credits
    This course covers the practical clinical issues experienced by the OTA students during the first 8 weeks of the quarter. After the successful completion of the 8-week Fieldwork IIB Experience, students come back to campus for a seminar for directed discussion and sharing based upon actual clinical experiences. Practical preparation for the national occupational therapy assistant certification examination is emphasized.

    Prerequisites: OTA 235  and OTA 236 .

    Corequisites: OTA 240 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define and differentiate between occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant roles in the clinical fieldwork setting
    • Participate in a professional manner in group discussions regarding the effects of disease of disability on real clients, organizations, and populations
    • Recognize personal challenges and institute strategies necessary for successful completion of the national certification examination
    • Be eligible to take the examination for occupational therapy assistants given by the National Board for Certification of Occupational Therapy (NBCOT)
    • Find employment as an occupational therapy assistant after passing the NBCOT examination


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20

Philosophy

  
  •  

    PHIL 301 Public Health Ethics

    5 credits
    This course focuses on ethical issues in public health and health care policy. This includes health care rights, resource allocation issues, individual autonomy versus population health promotion, privacy and human subjects’ protection in public health data and research, and the use of summary measures to drive policy. Admission to the BASPH program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PHIL 305 Professional Ethics

    5 credits
    This course examines ethical questions that can arise for individuals working in business and other professions. Students will be equipped to identify the values that inform various professions and to skillfully resolve conflicts that arise between core value concepts.

    Prerequisites: Completion of an AAS, AAS-T, or AA degree or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the values that motivate professions like business, medicine, law or engineering
    • Describe the different ways that these key value concepts are interpreted and applied within the context of the different professions
    • Rationally resolve conflicts between ethical values using ethical theory, sound critical thinking, and an accurate understanding of the technical and cultural context in which the conflict arises
    • Demonstrate the ability to work with others in teams to negotiate resolutions to ethical cases drawn from such professions as medicine, accounting, engineering, law or management
    • Articulate clearly and persuasively one’s resolution to value conflicts using terminology and communication techniques that will give one’s proposals the best chance of being adopted
    • Explain why ethical practice is needed for healthy and productive professions


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PHIL 321 Design Philosophy and Ethics

    5 credits
    An overview of the varied approaches to the study of philosophy from classical to contemporary is applied to the evolving design field. A study of common design terminology and semantics, applied with proper reasoning, is integrated into student projects. Ethical decision-making within the design profession is emphasized.

    Prerequisites: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission.

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Describe contemporary design theories and their philosophical and ethical implications
    • Demonstrate the ability to critically analyze work done by other designers
    • Examine ethical norms from various cultural perspectives
    • Develop the skills required for visual and verbal communication of design concepts
    • Define the designer’s ethical obligations as the message mediator between client and audience
    • Evaluate ethical issues surrounding the design of objects, services, identities, and experiences. 
    • Draft a personal ethics statement tied to his/her design discipline
    • Develop the skills that will foster perception, comprehension, and design of meaningful objects and spaces


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PHIL& 120 Symbolic Logic

    5 credits
    A comprehensive introduction to symbolic logic, including its historical development, the structure of logical forms, deductive tools and techniques, the role of logic in language, mathematics, and philosophy, and applications in decision-making, computer programming, and silicon circuitry.

    Prerequisites: MATH 098  or MATH 099 , and ENGL 093 , or equivalent placement test scores.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify logical elements in natural and artificial languages
    • Determine tautological, contradictory, and contingent logical forms
    • Apply logical techniques to arrive at valid conclusions
    • Manipulate a symbolic language to arrive at deductive conclusions
    • Apply logical rules of inference, replacement, and quantification
    • Apply the mathematical skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, quantitative modeling, and formal logic to solve problems requiring reasoning, critical thinking, and rational problem solving


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Physical Therapist Assistant

  
  •  

    PTA 105 Introduction to Physical Therapy

    1 credits
    Covers the history and organization of the field of physical therapy, overview of practice settings, behavior and conduct expectations of the PTA, and the role of the PTA.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Therapist Assistant Program

    Corequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 115 , PTA 117 , and PTA 125  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Relate an overview of the history of rehabilitation treatments, the field of physical therapy and the major factors that influenced its development in the United States
    • Explain the organizational structure of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA)
    • Name other organizations involved in the physical therapy profession
    • Describe the various settings in which physical therapy is practiced
    • Relate the APTA Standards of Ethical Conduct for the Physical Therapist Assistant
    • Explain the use and value of the APTA Guide for Conduct of the Physical Therapist Assistant
    • Define each of the eight Values-Based Behaviors for the physical therapist assistant
    • Describe the physical therapist patient/client management model
    • Explain the role of the physical therapist assistant within the physical therapist patient/client management model
    • Discuss how the APTA Problem-solving Algorithm and its associated controlling assumptions, the PTA Direction Algorithm and the PTA Supervision Algorithm guide how PTs and PTAs work together to provide safe, effective, and efficient physical therapy services
    • Explain the use and benefits of a resume and cover letter in obtaining a position in the workforce as a physical therapist assistant
    • Develop a resume sufficient to obtain a position as a student in a physical therapy clinical rotation
    • Develop a cover letter sufficient to relate personal strengths relevant to a physical therapy clinical rotation
    • Define patient-centered care


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10
  
  •  

    PTA 115 Procedures I

    5 credits
    Introduces principles and techniques of basic patient care skills. Emphasis is on patient safety. Skills include vital signs, aseptic technique, positioning and draping, soft tissue mobilization, body mechanics and selected physical agents with focus on thermal agents.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Therapist Assistant Program

    Corequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 105 , PTA 117 , and PTA 125  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use online and print resources to obtain information in regard to modalities used in physical therapy practice
    • Safely and effectively implement selected components of interventions identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Electrotherapeutic agents
      • Infection control / aseptic technique
      • Functional training
      • Injury prevention - body mechanics
      • Positioning /draping
      • Manual therapy - therapeutic massage
      • Physical agents
      • Thermal agents (heat and ice)
      • Ultrasound
      • Phonophoresis 
      • Diathermy
      • Whirlpool
    • Safely and effectively perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Interview patients/clients, caregivers and family to obtain current information related to prior and current level of function and general health status
      • Vital signs
      • Anthropometric characteristics
      • Pain
      • Posture
    • When providing interventions and associated data collection techniques:
      • Display professional behaviors consistent with the expectations of the physical therapy profession
      • Protect patient modesty, privacy, and dignity
      • Apply current physical therapy knowledge, theory and clinical judgement
      • Consider the patient/client perspective and treatment environment.
      • Provide clear instructions, when educating patients, as directed by the supervising physical therapist  
      • Explain the rationale for selected interventions to achieve patient goals as identified in the plan of care
      • Review health records prior to carrying out the plan of care.
      • Monitor and adjust interventions within the plan of care in response to patient/client status and clinical indications
      • Report any changes in patient status or progress to the supervising physical therapist
      • Identify indications, contraindications, precautions and safety considerations for the patient and determine if the treatment intervention is appropriate
      • Determine when a directed intervention is either beyond the scope of work or personal scope of work of a physical therapist assistant
      • Recognize activities, positioning and posture that aggravate or relieve pain
      • Select relevant information for documentation
      • Prepare and maintain a safe working environment
      • Handle patients using safe techniques and appropriate body mechanics
      • As appropriate to the PTA, maintain and use physical therapy equipment safely and effectively
      • Provide patient centered care


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    PTA 117 Pathophysiology

    3 credits
    Survey of human pathophysiology covering common pathologies of major body systems. Emphasis on connecting the key elements of pathology and disease to working with patients as a PTA.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Therapist Assistant Program

    Corequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 105 , PTA 115 , and PTA 125  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Differentiate between selected normal human physiologic and pathophysiologic processes of selected body systems
    • Identify etiology, pathology, manifestation, treatment and prognosis of pathophysiology of selected body systems
    • Describe the physiological mechanisms of injury at the cellular level, including necrosis and the inflammatory response
    • Describe the physiology of the tissue repair process
    • Identify characteristic signs and symptoms of common disorders and diseases
    • Identify the negative effects of immobility on selected body systems
    • Identify special considerations for providing safe and effective physical therapy interventions for patients with pathological conditions


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    PTA 125 Kinesiology I

    4 credits
    Principles of kinesiology including osteokinematics, arthrokinematics, force, torque, and levers as applied to human movement. In-depth study of musculoskeletal anatomy and kinesiology with a focus on application to physical therapy.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Therapist Assistant Program

    Corequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 105 , PTA 115 , and PTA 117  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    PTA 126 Kinesiology II

    5 credits
    Continuation of in-depth study of musculoskeletal anatomy and kinesiology. Course also covers principles of typical gait, basic gait analysis techniques and common gait deviations.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 105 , PTA 115 , PTA 117 , and PTA 125  

    Corequisites: PTA 135 , PTA 145 , and PTA 155  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use common anatomic and kinesiologic terminology when describing human motion or position
    • Describe the alignment and position of the trunk and lower extremities at rest and during activities
    • Accurately identify and palpate anatomical surface landmarks for the lower extremity and trunk
    • Apply knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy and kinesiology to basic principles of movement, stretching, and activation of the muscles of the lower extremity and trunk
    • Identify the bones and primary bony features relevant to joints of the lower extremity and trunk
    • Describe the location and primary function of supporting structures for joints
    • Cite the normal ranges of motion for joints in the human body
    • Cite the proximal and distal attachments, actions, and innervations of the muscles of the body associated with joints of the lower extremity and trunk commonly treated in physical therapy
    • Explain primary muscular interactions in common body motions especially those of the trunk and lower extremities
    • Identify the components of the normal gait cycle
    • Describe the muscular and joint interactions that occur during the gait cycle
    • Define terminology related to and used to describe human gait
    • Perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the PT related to gait using common gait analysis techniques
    • Describe common atypical gait patterns


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    PTA 135 Topics in Physical Therapy I

    3 credits
    Communication skills for the PTA including written documentation, plan of care review, recognizing and responding to individual and cultural differences, interpersonal communication, educating patients and caregivers, and educating others about the role of the PTA.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 105 , PTA 115 , PTA 117 , and PTA 125  

    Corequisites: PTA 126 PTA 145 , and PTA 155  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define model of disablement
    • Discuss how models of disablement are relevant to the role of the PTA
    • Use the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) to describe a patient’s situation and status
    • Discuss the importance of privacy and confidentiality in healthcare
    • Discuss patient confidentiality guidelines and requirements and relate these requirements to HIPAA practices
    • Identify the roles and significance of documentation in health care
    • Explain when to document, what to document and why the documentation is important as PTA provides patient interventions
    • Identify the categories of documentation content
    • Recognize various physical therapy documentation formats
    • Locate relevant information in the medical record
    • Compare and contrast all parts of the SOAP note for physical therapy documentation
    • Use an organized and logical framework to document patient care
    • Use language for physical therapy documentation that is accurate, complete, legible, timely, and consistent with institutional, legal, and billing requirements
    • Use appropriate terminology, abbreviations, grammar, syntax, and punctuation in physical therapy documentation and communication
    • Appropriately correct charting errors
    • Document physical therapy services provided including the appropriate elements of:
      • Patient/client self-report
      • Identification of specific intervention(s) provided
      • Frequency, duration, and intensity
      • Equipment provided
      • Changes in patient/client impairment, functional limitation and disability status as they relate to the plan of care
      • Response to interventions including, adverse reactions to interventions, if any
      • Factors that modify frequency or intensity of intervention and progression goals, including patient/client adherence to patient/client-related instructions
      • Communication with physical therapists, patients/clients, caregivers, and other healthcare team members
      • Indication of no-show or cancellation
    • Demonstrate an awareness of one’s own communication (verbal and non-verbal) style and its impact upon communication with the patient, physical therapist and other healthcare personnel
    • Discuss the interpersonal and communication skills involved in establishing a therapeutic relationship with a patient
    • Discuss the role and impact of individual and cultural differences in the provision of physical therapy services
    • Recognize individual and cultural differences
    • Identify culturally sensitive responses to a variety of patient-care scenarios
    • Locate resources to inform an appropriate and sensitive response to individual and cultural differences
    • Identify, respect, and act with consideration for patients’/clients’ differences, values, preferences, and expressed needs in all work-related activities
    • Demonstrate an awareness of social responsibility and advocacy, including participation in professional and community organizations and activities
    • Describe basic teaching and learning principles and their application to rehabilitation
    • Apply principles of learning using a variety of teaching strategies during instruction of patients, caregivers and other members of the health care team
    • Educate others about the role of the physical therapist assistant
    • Educate others using teaching methods that are commensurate with the needs of the patient or caregiver


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    PTA 136 Topics in Physical Therapy II

    3 credits


    Course covers administrative skills relevant to the PTA including accurate and timely billing, resource management, managing productivity, and an overview of payment systems. Additional topics include skills for reading healthcare literature and the APTA Guide to PT Practice.

    Prerequisites: PTA 126 , PTA 135 , PTA 145 , and PTA 155  

    Corequisites: PTA 146  and PTA 156  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use online and print resources to find current laws, regulations, and policies that apply to physical therapy, physical therapists and physical therapist assistants 
    • Describe how current healthcare laws, regulations, and policies affect physical therapist assistants
    • Collect relevant healthcare literature using print and online research tools
    • Identify basic concepts in professional literature including validity, reliability and level of statistical significance
    • Generalize the main ideas of a piece of relevant healthcare literature and how they apply to the clinical work of a physical therapist assistant
    • Explain the relevance and importance of resource management in physical therapy
    • Discuss implications of providing accurate and timely information for billing and reimbursement purposes
    • Describe aspects of practice management including organizational planning and operation of the physical therapy service
    • Discuss legal practice standards, including federal, state, and institutional regulations related to patient care and fiscal management
    • Define and give examples of billing fraud, waste and abuse related to physical therapy
    • Identify ways to prevent billing fraud, waste, and abuse in the field of physical therapy
    • Identify resources and reporting actions if a PTA identifies fraud, waste, or abuse related to the utilization of and payment for physical therapy and other health care services
    • Self-assess professional behaviors including interpersonal skills, communication skills, use of constructive feedback, professionalism, responsibility, and stress management
    • Differentiate the roles and responsibilities of other health care providers in patient-centered care
    • Employ appropriate etiquette when using electronic communication tools in professional communications
    • Identify the components of the PTA Clinical Performance Instrument (CPI) and their correct application


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
  •  

    PTA 145 Orthopedics I

    5 credits
    Principles of therapeutic exercise and intervention skills for aerobic conditioning, agility training, postural awareness and stabilization, strengthening, flexibility and electrotherapeutic modalities. Data collection skills for joint movement and muscle performance. Review of pathology and application of skills for common musculoskeletal conditions.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 105 , PTA 115  , PTA 117 , and PTA 125  

    Corequisites: PTA 126 , PTA 135 , and PTA 155  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe physiological responses during exercise
    • Identify adaptations and changes in anatomy and physiology as a result of exercise
    • Explain physiological responses to diminished activity
    • Explain general healing mechanisms for specific tissue types including bone and soft tissue healing
    • Apply concepts of anatomy, biomechanics, pathophysiology, and exercise physiology to implement safe and effective therapeutic exercise interventions within the plan of care
    • Describe the effects of electrical currents in the application of electrotherapeutic modality interventions
    • Implement selected components of electrotherapeutic modality interventions as identified within the plan of care established by the physical therapist
    • Implement selected components of intervention techniques including:
      • Interview patients/clients, caregivers and family to obtain current information related to prior and current level of function and general health status
      • Therapeutic exercise
      • Aerobic capacity / endurance conditioning and reconditioning
      • Breathing and relaxation strategies relevant to the intervention
      • Body mechanics and postural training
      • Manual therapy - passive range of motion
      • Flexibility exercises
      • Coordination and agility training
      • Strength, power, and endurance training
    • Perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Aerobic capacity and endurance
      • Electrotherapeutic agents
      • Functional range of motion
      • Joint range of motion
      • Joint integrity and mobility
      • Muscle length
      • Muscle function and performance
      • Location and intensity of pain
      • Posture and body mechanics
    • When providing interventions and associated data collection techniques:
      • Display professional behaviors consistent with the expectations of the physical therapy profession
      • Protect patient modesty, privacy, and dignity
      • Apply current physical therapy knowledge, theory and clinical judgement
      • Consider the patient/client perspective and treatment environment.
      • Provide clear instructions, apply principles of learning, and use a variety of teaching strategies when educating patients, caregivers, and other members of the health care team as directed by the supervising physical therapist
      • Explain the rationale for selected interventions to achieve patient goals as identified in the plan of care
      • Review health records prior to carrying out the plan of care.
      • Monitor and adjust interventions within the plan of care in response to patient/client status and clinical indications
      • Report any changes in patient status or progress to the supervising physical therapist
      • Identify indications, contraindications, precautions and safety considerations for the patient and determine if the treatment intervention is appropriate
      • Determine when a directed intervention is either beyond the scope of work or personal scope of work of a physical therapist assistant
      • Identify relevant information to communicate to the physical therapist for the discharge planning process
      • Recognize activities, positioning and posture that aggravate or relieve pain
      • Select relevant information for documentation
      • Prepare and maintain a safe working environment
      • Handle patients using safe techniques and appropriate body mechanics
      • Select relevant information for documentation and billing purposes  
      • As appropriate to the PTA, maintain and use physical therapy equipment safely and effectively
      • Provide patient centered care


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    PTA 146 Orthopedics II

    7 credits


    This course covers the application of concepts and skills from Orthopedics I to musculoskeletal conditions of the upper extremity, spine, and lower extremity.

    Prerequisites: PTA 126 , PTA 135 , PTA 145 , and PTA 155  

    Students must meet with a faculty adviser prior to registration.

    Corequisites: PTA 136  and PTA 156  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe common soft tissue injuries, fractures, and diseases of the foot and ankle, knee, hip, spine, pelvis, shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand
    • Identify and integrate appropriate evidence-based resources to support clinical decision-making for progression of the patient within the plan of care established by the PT
    • Describe clinically relevant physical therapy interventions used during periods of
      • muscle injury, repair, and immobilization
      • tendon and ligament healing
      • bone and cartilage healing
    • Implement selected components of interventions for patients with musculoskeletal disorders as identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Body mechanics and postural training
      • Biofeedback
      • Manual therapy techniques - soft tissue mobilization
      • Mechanical modalities
      • Therapeutic exercise
      • Coordination and agility training
      • Flexibility exercises
      • Strength, power, and endurance training
    • Perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Interview patients/clients, caregivers and family to obtain current information related to prior and current level of function and general health status
      • Posture and body mechanics
      • Location and intensity of pain
      • Joint integrity and mobility
      • Range of motion
      • Muscle performance
    • When providing interventions and associated data collection techniques:
      • Display professional behaviors consistent with the expectations of the physical therapy profession
      • Protect patient modesty, privacy, and dignity
      • Apply current physical therapy knowledge, theory and clinical judgement
      • Consider the patient/client perspective and treatment environment
      • Provide clear instructions, apply principles of learning, and use a variety of teaching strategies when educating patients, caregivers, and other members of the health care team as directed by the supervising physical therapist
      • Explain the rationale for selected interventions to achieve patient goals as identified in the plan of care
      • Review health records prior to carrying out the plan of care.
      • Monitor and adjust interventions within the plan of care in response to patient/client status and clinical indications
      • Report any changes in patient status or progress to the supervising physical therapist
      • Identify indications, contraindications, precautions and safety considerations for the patient and determine if the treatment intervention is appropriate
      • Determine when a directed intervention is either beyond the scope of work or personal scope of work of a physical therapist assistant
      • Identify relevant information to communicate to the physical therapist for the discharge planning process
      • Recognize activities, positioning and posture that aggravate or relieve pain
      • Complete documentation which is accurate, legible and follows appropriate guidelines and format regulations
      • Prepare and maintain a safe working environment
      • Handle patients using safe techniques and appropriate body mechanics
      • Select relevant information for documentation and billing purposes  
      • As appropriate to the PTA, maintain and use physical therapy equipment safely and effectively
      • Provide patient centered care


    Total Hours: 110 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80

  
  •  

    PTA 155 Physical Rehabilitation I

    6 credits
    Intervention, data collection and communication skills for providing safe and effective physical therapy for patients in acute care settings as well as with geriatric patients. Skills include transfers and bed mobility, assistive mobility devices, and communicating with the healthcare team.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 105 , PTA 115 , PTA 117 , and PTA 125  

    Corequisites: PTA 126 , PTA 135 , and PTA 145  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe and implement adaptations to communication techniques, interventions and data collection techniques within the plan of care that are important for providing safe, compassionate and effective care for geriatric patients, patients in acute care settings, patients with cardiac or pulmonary conditions and/or patients with specific post-operative precautions
    • Describe the roles of those involved in patient care and discharge planning for a patient in acute, sub-acute, and long-term care facilities
    • Discuss the importance of patient-centered inter-professional collaborative care
    • Value the role of caregivers in treatment and patient home care
    • Effectively provide patient-related instruction to family members and caregivers
    • Instruct patients in weight-bearing status parameters
    • Define the levels of assistance provided to patients during functional mobility
    • Identify and provide the appropriate level of assistance to a patient during functional mobility
    • Compare and contrast a variety of special patient care units in an inpatient care facility
    • Identify special support and monitoring equipment, diagnostic tests, labs, and/or procedures which may be encountered in acute, sub-acute, and long-term care facilities
    • Describe age-related changes in anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology
    • Discuss psychosocial aspects of aging
    • Describe ageism and its potential effects in rehabilitation
    • Recognize and report when signs of elder abuse or neglect are present
    • Identify assessment tools commonly used by physical therapists with geriatric patient populations
    • Administer standardized questionnaires and tests relevant to geriatric patients as appropriate to the role of a PTA
    • Discuss the importance of improving balance and reducing fall risk in geriatric patients with increased fall risk
    • Discuss reimbursement and supervision issues involved with providing physical therapy services to geriatric patients
    • Implement selected components of interventions identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Functional training
      • Bed mobility
      • Basic transfers
      • Assistive device equipment and use for gait and basic transfers
      • Basic wheelchair equipment and use
      • Airway clearance techniques: breathing exercises, coughing techniques, and secretion mobilization
      • Conditioning or reconditioning
      • Strength, power, and endurance training for ventilatory muscles
      • Relaxation techniques and breathing strategies
      • Integumentary protection techniques
      • Injury prevention or reduction education
      • Application, adjustment, use and care of relevant adaptive, assistive, orthotic, and supportive devices and equipment
      • Motor function training: gait and locomotion training
      • Functional training in self-care, home and community life
    • Perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the physical therapist including data collection for:
      • Interview patients/clients, caregivers and family to obtain current information related to prior and current level of function and general health status
      • Aerobic capacity and endurance
      • Assistive devices
      • Gait, locomotion, and balance
      • Ventilation, respiration and circulation examination
      • Arousal, attention and cognition
      • Pain and integumentary integrity
      • Assistive, adaptive, orthotic, protective, and supportive devices
      • Environmental barriers for self-care, home and community life
    • When providing interventions and associated data collection techniques:
      • Display professional behaviors consistent with the expectations of the physical therapy profession
      • Protect patient modesty, privacy, and dignity
      • Apply current physical therapy knowledge, theory and clinical judgement
      • Consider the patient/client perspective and treatment environment.
      • Provide clear instructions, apply principles of learning, and use a variety of teaching strategies when educating patients, caregivers, and other members of the health care team as directed by the supervising physical therapist
      • Explain the rationale for selected interventions to achieve patient goals as identified in the plan of care
      • Review health records prior to carrying out the plan of care.
      • Monitor and adjust interventions within the plan of care in response to patient/client status and clinical indications
      • Report any changes in patient status or progress to the supervising physical therapist
      • Identify indications, contraindications, precautions and safety considerations for the patient and determine if the treatment intervention is appropriate
      • Determine when a directed intervention is either beyond the scope of work or personal scope of work of a physical therapist assistant
      • Identify relevant information to communicate to the physical therapist for the discharge planning process
      • Recognize activities, positioning and posture that aggravate or relieve pain
      • Select relevant information for documentation
      • Prepare and maintain a safe working environment
      • Handle patients using safe techniques and appropriate body mechanics
      • Select relevant information for documentation and billing purposes
      • As appropriate to the PTA, maintain and use physical therapy equipment safely and effectively
      • Provide patient centered care


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    PTA 156 Physical Rehabilitation II

    7 credits
    Therapeutic interventions and data collection skills for patients with neurologic conditions. Review of structure and function of the nervous system and common neurologic and neuromuscular disorders.

    Prerequisites: PTA 126 , PTA 135 , PTA 145 , and PTA 155  

    Corequisites: PTA 136  and PTA 146  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify significant structures and functions of the structures in the nervous system
    • Identify causes and mechanisms of common neurologic and neuromuscular disorders.
    • List complications associated with common neurologic and neuromuscular disorders.
    • Describe the roles and responsibilities of health care providers involved in the care of patients with common neurologic and neuromuscular disorders.
    • Relate motor control and motor learning theories to therapeutic interventions for patients with common neurologic and neuromuscular disorders.
    • Explain the use of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation patterns and techniques
    • Describe sensory systems associated with balance control and coordination
    • Identify motor strategies used for balance control
    • Identify and integrate appropriate evidence-based resources to support clinical decision-making for progression of the patient within the plan of care established by the PT
    • Implement selected components of interventions for patients with common neurologic and neuromuscular disorders identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Functional training
      • Gait and locomotion training
      • Balance and coordination training
      • Posture awareness training
      • Neuromotor development training
      • Strength training
      • Passive range of motion
      • Integumentary protection techniques
      • Wheelchair propulsion programs for conditioning
      • Application & adjustment of devices and equipment
    • Perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Arousal, attention, and cognition
      • Environmental barriers, self-care and home management
      • Gait, locomotion, and balance
      • Posture and body mechanics
      • Muscle function including changes in muscle tone and strength
      • Joint integrity and mobility
      • Pain and integumentary integrity
      • Sensory response
      • Vital signs
      • Assistive, adaptive, orthotic, protective and supportive devices
    • When providing interventions and associated data collection techniques:
      • Display professional behaviors consistent with the expectations of the physical therapy profession
      • Protect patient modesty, privacy, and dignity
      • Apply current physical therapy knowledge, theory and clinical judgement
      • Consider the patient/client perspective and treatment environment.
      • Provide clear instructions, apply principles of learning, and use a variety of teaching strategies when educating patients, caregivers, and other members of the health care team as directed by the supervising physical therapist
      • Explain the rationale for selected interventions to achieve patient goals as identified in the plan of care
      • Review health records prior to carrying out the plan of care.
      • Monitor and adjust interventions within the plan of care in response to patient/client status and clinical indications
      • Report any changes in patient status or progress to the supervising physical therapist
      • Identify indications, contraindications, precautions and safety considerations for the patient and determine if the treatment intervention is appropriate
      • Determine when a directed intervention is either beyond the scope of work or personal scope of work of a physical therapist assistant
      • Identify relevant information to communicate to the physical therapist for the discharge planning process
      • Recognize activities, positioning and posture that aggravate or relieve pain
      • Complete documentation which is accurate, legible and follows appropriate guidelines and format regulations
      • Prepare and maintain a safe working environment
      • Handle patients using safe techniques and appropriate body mechanics
      • Select relevant information for documentation and billing purposes
      • As appropriate to the PTA, maintain and use physical therapy equipment safely and effectively
      • Provide patient centered care


    Total Hours: 110 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
  •  

    PTA 190 Clinical Affiliation I

    4 credits
    Initial full-time clinical affiliation in a physical therapy clinical setting under supervision of a clinical instructor. Application of behavioral, data collection, and therapeutic intervention skills acquired in previous PTA technical coursework.

    Prerequisites: PTA 136 , PTA 146 , and PTA 156  

    Corequisites: PTA 215  and PTA 255  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Within the physical therapist’s plan of care, safely and consistently perform selected physical therapy interventions and associated data collection techniques with limited skill proficiency for simple patient conditions, tasks, and care environments using a moderate expenditure of time and effort and with maximal input and direction from the clinical instructor
    • Given extra time and frequent guidance, perform adequate documentation and communication with the physical therapist regarding all aspects of patient treatment and patient response to physical therapy interventions
    • Use resources and equipment within a physical therapy setting in an efficient and effective manner 100% of the time, with direct supervision from the clinical instructor 75%-90% of the time
    • Demonstrate consistency in developing proficiency of clinical problem solving with simple patient conditions and situations
    • Use self-assessment skills and develop plans to improve knowledge, skills, and behaviors 100% of the time, with guidance of the clinical instructor 75%-90% of the time
    • Adapt delivery of physical therapy services with consideration for patients’ differences, values, preferences, and needs with moderate guidance from the clinical instructor
    • Perform in a manner consistent with established legal standards, standards of the profession, and ethical guidelines 100% of the time, with guidance from the clinical instructor 75%-90% of the time
    • Demonstrate expected clinical behaviors in a professional manner with simple patient conditions and situations
    • Consistently perform in a safe manner that minimizes the risk to patient, self, and others in situations that involve patients with simple conditions and care environments and seek consultation or assistance as appropriate
    • Communicate effectively with patient/clients, family members, caregivers, practioners and/or inter-professional team members


    Total Hours: 120 Practicum or Internship Hours: 120
  
  •  

    PTA 215 Procedures II

    5 credits
    Principles and application of physical agents and modalities with focus on mechanical and light agents. Therapeutic interventions and data collection skills for integumentary conditions and edema management within the role of the PTA.

    Prerequisites: PTA 136 , PTA 146 , and PTA 156  

    Corequisites: PTA 190  and PTA 255  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify activities, positioning, and postures that produce or relieve trauma to the integumentary system
    • Identify signs of infection as they relate to therapeutic interventions for the integumentary or lymphatic systems
    • List therapeutic interventions relevant to patients with lymphatic system disorders
    • Implement selected components of interventions for patients with lymphatic system disorders as identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist
    • List therapeutic interventions relevant to patients with integumentary system disorders
    • Implement selected components of interventions for patients with integumentary disorders as identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Infection control procedures
      • Application and adjustment of supportive devices
      • Integumentary repair and protection techniques
      • Hydrotherapy
    • Perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care for patients including:
      • Anthropometric characteristics - limb girth
      • Activities that aggravate or relieve edema
      • Integumentary integrity
      • Joint integrity and mobility
      • Pain location and intensity
    • Describe the use of light and athermal agents as physical therapy interventions
    • Implement selected components of physical therapy mechanical modalities including mechanical traction and compression
    • Identify indications, contraindications, precautions and safety considerations for the patient for wound care, lymphedema, mechanical and light agents
    • Identify when a directed intervention is either beyond the scope of work or personal scope of work of a physical therapist assistant
    • Integrate and apply knowledge and skills from PTA coursework including kinesiology, modalities, therapeutic exercise and other orthopedic interventions to orthopedic case scenarios


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    PTA 235 Topics in Physical Therapy III

    2 credits
    This course covers topics and skills of PTA career development, performance improvement & quality assurance, and ethical behavior in the physical therapy workplace.

    Prerequisites: PTA 190 , PTA 215 , and PTA 255  

    Corequisites: PTA 256 , PTA 280 , and PTA 290  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify resources both within and outside the clinic that help to increase one’s knowledge and skills as a physical therapist assistant
    • Identify opportunities for lifelong learning as a PTA
    • Assess the relevance and value of opportunities for lifelong learning as a PTA
    • Design a self-directed plan for career development and lifelong learning
    • Identify available resources for PTA board examination preparation
    • Design a self-directed plan for board examination preparation
    • Identify performance improvement and quality assurance activities in the workplace
    • Contribute to a physical therapy workplace team through participation in performance improvement and/or quality assurance activities
    • Analyze and discuss ethical situations encountered in physical therapy
    • Apply an ethical decision-making framework to different types of ethical scenarios in the physical therapy workplace
    • Utilize the APTA Standards of Ethical Conduct for the PTA and the Guide for Conduct of the PTA in analysis and discussion of ethical situations in physical therapy


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    PTA 236 Topics in Physical Therapy IV

    3 credits
    This course covers skills to obtain a job and enter the workforce as a PTA including licensure preparation, board exam review, job search, and interview skills.

    Prerequisites: PTA 235 , PTA 256 , PTA 280 , and PTA 290  

    Corequisites: PTA 281  and PTA 291  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Revise own resume sufficient to obtain a position in the workforce as an entry-level physical therapist assistant 
    • Develop a cover letter sufficient to relate personal strengths relevant to an entry-level workforce position as a physical therapist assistant
    • Employ effective PTA job search and application skills including the following:
      • Evaluate the qualities of a potential work environment
      • Identify where to find current jobs available on the market
      • Complete forms often required in a job application process
    • Employ effective job interview skills for PTA positions
    • Implement a board exam preparation plan
    • Complete a mock board exam
    • Complete initial PTA licensure application paperwork


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    PTA 255 Physical Rehabilitation III

    4 credits
    Motor development, common diagnoses and treatment considerations for pediatric patients. Covers therapeutic interventions and data collection skills within the role of the PTA important for providing safe and effective physical therapy for children.

    Prerequisites: PTA 136 , PTA 146 , and PTA 156  

    Corequisites: PTA 190  and PTA 215  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define gross- and fine- motor milestones
    • List righting and equilibrium reactions
    • Identify characteristics of motor development throughout the lifespan
    • Describe the pathology and clinical characteristics of common pediatric disorders
    • Recognize signs of abuse of vulnerable populations
    • Report to appropriate authorities suspected cases of abuse of vulnerable populations
    • Identify assessment tools commonly used by physical therapists with pediatric patient populations
    • Communicate effectively with pediatric patients
    • Identify the differences between common pediatric intervention philosophies
    • Use the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and heath to describe a patient’s/client’s impairments , activity and participation limitations
    • Adapt selected components of interventions for pediatric patients as identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Functional training
      • Motor function training
      • Positioning and handling
      • Strengthening and stability training
      • Neuromotor development training
      • Patient education
    • Adapt components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the physical therapist for pediatric patients including:
      • Environmental barriers, self-care and home management
      • Gait, locomotion, and balance
      • Pain location and intensity
      • Mental functions: arousal, mentation, and cognition
      • Muscle performance
      • Neuromotor development and function
      • Assistive, adaptive, orthotic, protective, and supportive devices
    • Participate in a service- learning experience with special populations to increase understanding of the needs/challenges of the community being served
    • Demonstrate self-reflection of how the service learning experience influenced his/her view of community service in PTA education


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    PTA 256 Physical Rehabilitation IV

    4 credits


    PTA skills for working with patients with complex conditions including patients with spinal cord injuries and patients post amputation. Course also covers psychosocial aspects of patient care encountered when working as a PTA.

    Psychosocial aspects of care includes topics of chronic pain, grief, depression, and other mental health conditions commonly encountered in physical therapy.

    Prerequisites: PTA 190 , PTA 215 , and PTA 255  

    Corequisites: PTA 235 , PTA 280 , and PTA 290  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss the role of the PTA in working with patient with complex conditions
    • Identify the common causes of spinal cord injury
    • Describe the clinical presentation following damage to the spinal cord
    • Discuss the impact of complications associated with spinal cord injury
    • Take appropriate action as a PTA to respond to emergency situations related to spinal cord injury such as autonomic dysreflexia
    • Identify the typical functional outcomes for patients with spinal cord injury at various lesion levels
    • Relate new technology and treatments related to spinal cord injury
    • Safely, effectively, and efficiently implement selected physical therapy interventions and data collection techniques within the PT’s plan of care for a patient post spinal cord injury
    • Identify the common causes of lower extremity amputation
    • List and describe the types of postsurgical dressings used post amputation
    • List the phases of care and related prosthetics post amputation
    • Safely, effectively, and efficiently implement selected physical therapy interventions and data collection techniques within the PT’s plan of care for a patient post amputation
    • Discuss the psychosocial factors that influence rehabilitation
    • Identify the various professionals who may be involved in evaluation and interventions for patients with psychosocial issues
    • Recognize the warning signs of possible post-traumatic stress disorder and other psychosocial crisis points or dangerous behaviors
    • Describe possible actions to take as a PTA when encountering a patient who is demonstrating behaviors dangerous to the patient or to others
    • Broadly describe the grief process and the implications of the interaction of the grief process with physical therapy treatment
    • List defense mechanisms which are common reactions to disability
    • Identify methods to help patients manage anxiety and/or depression during physical therapy sessions which are within the scope of work of the physical therapist and physical therapist assistant
    • Implement relaxation interventions within the PT plan of care
    • Compare and contrast the presentation of acute, persistent, and chronic pain
    • List causes and risk factors for chronic pain
    • Identify the psychosocial factors associated with chronic pain
    • Summarize medical management options for chronic pain
    • Discuss complementary and alternative medicine approaches to managing chronic pain
    • Describe physical therapy intervention approaches appropriate for individuals with chronic pain


  
  •  

    PTA 280 Seminar I

    1 credits


    This course covers foundational case presentation skills in preparation for capstone physical therapy case presentation in Seminar II.

    Prerequisites: PTA 190 , PTA 215 , and PTA 255  

    Corequisites: PTA 235 , PTA 256 , and PTA 290  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify available case presentation tools and styles
    • Identify the qualities of and skills for an effective case presentation to a group
    • Identify and discuss the evidence-based resources that support the clinical decision making for the progression of the patient within the plan of care established by the PT
    • Use the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health to identify the patient’s/client’s impairments, activity, and participation limitations for a physical therapy case presentation
    • Determine appropriate presentation tools and styles for a physical therapy case presentation
    • Design a physical therapy case presentation using effective presentation tools and skills


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10

  
  •  

    PTA 281 Seminar II

    1 credit
    This course includes the review, presentation, and discussion of a case based on a clinical affiliation experience from PTA 290  or PTA 291 .

    Prerequisites: PTA 235 , PTA 256 , PTA 280 , and PTA 290  

    Corequisites: PTA 236  and PTA 291  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Incorporate all required elements in a case presentation
    • Integrate concepts from prerequisite course work, foundational courses and PTA technical and clinical courses in a physical therapy case presentation
    • Identify and discuss the evidence-based resources that support the clinical decision making for the progression of the patient within the plan of care established by the PT
    • Present a physical therapy case presentation  applying the  International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health to discuss the patient’s/client’s impairments, activity, and participation limitations
    • Create effective learning objectives which summarize the main points of a case presentation
    • Appropriately de-identify patient information for case presentation following confidentiality guidelines
    • Use appropriate terminology, abbreviations, grammar, and syntax in case presentation
    • Present a physical therapy case presentation and its related learning objectives


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10
  
  •  

    PTA 290 Clinical Affiliation II

    8 credits
    Full-time clinical affiliation to develop and refine practical application of PTA skills under the supervision of an on-site clinical instructor.

    Prerequisites: PTA 190 , PTA 215 , and PTA 255  

    Corequisites: PTA 235 , PTA 256 , and PTA 280  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Within the physical therapist’s plan of care, safely and consistently perform selected physical therapy interventions and associated data collection techniques with limited skill proficiency for simple patient conditions, tasks, and care environments under the direction and supervision of the clinical instructor less than 25% of the time and using a minimal expenditure of time and effort
    • Within the physical therapist’s plan of care, safely and consistently perform selected physical therapy interventions and associated data collection techniques for complex patient conditions, tasks, and care environments under the direction and supervision of the clinical instructor 25-50% of the time, demonstrating developing proficiency, and using a minimal expenditure of time and effort
    • In a timely manner with occasional guidance, perform accurate and relevant documentation and communication with the physical therapist regarding all aspects of patient treatment and patient response to physical therapy interventions
    • Communicate effectively with patient/clients, family members, caregivers, practioners and/or inter-professional team members.
    • Use resources and equipment within a physical therapy setting in an efficient and effective manner 100% of the time, with direct supervision from the clinical instructor 50%-75% of the time
    • Demonstrate consistency and proficiency of clinical problem solving with simple tasks and require only occasional cueing for more complex patient conditions and situations
    • Use self-assessment skills and develop plans to improve knowledge, skills, and behaviors 100% of the time, with guidance of the clinical instructor less than 25% of the time
    • Adapt delivery of physical therapy services with consideration for patients’ differences, values, preferences, and needs with minimal guidance from the clinical instructor
    • When working with new or complex situations, perform in a manner consistent with established legal standards, standards of the profession, and ethical guidelines 100% of the time, with guidance from the clinical instructor less than 25% of the time
    • Demonstrate expected clinical behaviors in a professional manner with simple and complex patient conditions and situations 
    • Consistently perform in a safe manner that minimizes the risk to patient, self, and others in situations that involve patients with simple or complex conditions and care environments and seek consultation or assistance as appropriate


    Total Hours: 240 Practicum or Internship Hours: 240
  
  •  

    PTA 291 Clinical Affiliation III

    9 credits
    Final full-time clinical affiliation to continue to develop and refine practical application of PTA skills under the supervision of a clinical instructor in preparation to enter the field as an entry-level PTA.

    Prerequisites: PTA 235 , PTA 256 , PTA 280 , and PTA 290  

    Corequisites: PTA 236  and PTA 281  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Within the physical therapist’s plan of care, safely, consistently, efficiently, and independently demonstrate skilled performance of selected physical therapy interventions and associated data collection techniques for simple and complex patient conditions and environments, with appropriate consultation with the supervising therapist for new or unusual situations
    • Independently and in a timely manner, perform accurate and relevant documentation and communication with the physical therapist regarding all aspects of patient treatment and patient response to physical therapy interventions
    • Independently use resources and equipment in a physical therapy setting in an efficient and effective manner
    • Demonstrate consistency, proficiency, and skill in clinical problem solving with simple and complex patient conditions and environments
    • Use self-assessment skills and develop plans to improve knowledge, skills, and behaviors
    • Adapt delivery of physical therapy services with consideration for patients’ differences, values, preferences, and needs 
    • Perform in a manner consistent with established legal standards, standards of the profession, and ethical guidelines at all times
    • Demonstrate expected clinical behaviors in a professional manner with simple and complex patient conditions and environments 
    • Consistently perform in a safe manner that minimizes the risk to patient, self, and others in situations that involve patients with simple or complex conditions and care environments and seek consultation or assistance as appropriate


    Total Hours: 270 Practicum or Internship Hours: 270

Physics

  
  •  

    PHYS& 114 General Physics I w/Lab

    5 credits


    This course covers kinematics, motion in two-dimensions, force and motion, work and energy, momentum and collisions, circular motion, gravitation, rotational motion, and solids. Includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: MATH 098 , or MATH 099 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define the basic concepts of introductory mechanical physics
    • Describe physical and quantitative relationships between kinetic and potential energy; impulse and momentum; force, mass, and acceleration; inertia and mass; work, power, and energy
    • Express, with the use of graphing techniques and analytical means, the relationships among displacement velocity and acceleration
    • Solve projectile and force problems using vector analysis
    • Define Newton’s Laws of Motion and analytically illustrate how they determine motion in “real-life” examples
    • Apply information learned to team laboratory and demonstration exercises


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
  •  

    PHYS& 115 General Physics II w/Lab

    5 credits
    This course covers ideal gas law & kinetic theory, thermodynamics, temperature and heat, heat transfer, electric forces and fields, electric potential, electric circuits, magnetic forces & fields, electromagnetic induction. Includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: PHYS& 114 .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Solve physical problems in class and labs
    • Apply physical concepts to practical applications
    • Solve problems involving thermodynamics
    • Solve problems involving electricity and magnetisms


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    PHYS& 221 Engineering Physics I with Lab

    5 credits
    This course covers the basic principles of Newtonian mechanics including: vector mathematics, multidimensional kinematics, Newton’s laws of dynamics, various forces of nature, circular motion, the universal gravitational law, mechanical energy conservation methods, linear momentum, and rigid body kinematics and dynamics. Laboratory work is included.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 142  

    Corequisites: ENGR 100  and MATH& 151  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Expand and improve quantitative/symbolic manipulation capabilities
    • Apply the paradigms of classical mechanics to problem solving in the engineering context
    • Measure, record, and analyze signals using A/D converters with various sensors interfaced to computers using appropriate software
    • Explain both the power and limitations of the classical Newtonian approach in the conceptualization and design of engineered creations


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    PHYS& 222 Engineering Physics II with Lab

    5 credits
    This course covers the basic principles of electromagnetism including: Coulomb’s law, the electric and potential fields, Gauss’s law, capacitance, current, resistance, DC circuit theory, magnetism, the magnetic field, Biot-Savart & Ampere’s law, and Faraday’s law. Laboratory work is included.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 151  and PHYS& 221  

    Corequisites: MATH& 152  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Expand and improve quantitative/symbolic manipulation capabilities
    • Apply the paradigms of classical E&M to problem solving in the engineering context
    • Measure, record, and analyze signals using A/D converters with various sensors interfaced to computers using appropriate software
    • Explain both the power and limitations of a Maxwell’s equations approach in the conceptualization and design of engineered creations


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    PHYS& 223 Engineering Physics III with Lab

    5 credits
    This course covers the basic principles of oscillatory motion and Hook’s law, the wave equation, mechanical waves (acoustics), Maxwell’s equations, geometric optics, physical optics, diffraction, interference, and polarization. Laboratory work is included.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 152  and PHYS& 222  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Expand and improve quantitative/symbolic manipulation capabilities
    • Apply oscillatory/wave phenomena to problem solving in the engineering context
    • Measure, record, and analyze signals using A/D converters with various sensors interfaced to computers using appropriate software
    • Explain both the power and limitations of a Maxwell’s equations approach in the conceptualization and design of engineered creations, especially in regards to EM/optical communications


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

Political Science

  
  •  

    POLS& 202 American Government

    5 credits
    This course explores various interpretations of American democracy and evaluates the changing nature of the American political system, origins, institutions, and operations. Students investigate issues of individual rights, popular representation, and power and policies; analyze formal and informal institutions of government; articulate conventional and unconventional means of citizen participation; and interpret political outcomes.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 099  (or placement into ENGL& 101 )

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Evaluate information about American political ideologies and evidence used to support them
    • Analyze real world evidence and hypothetical political and economic issues
    • Explain key concepts in American government and politics
    • Evaluate the political analyses of political commentators and political actors and other sources of political information to distinguish between fact and opinion
    • Evaluate and articulate the impact of historical and current events on the development and functioning of American Government
    • Evaluate and draw conclusions from competing and contradictory sources
    • Present theoretical solutions to contemporary political and economic problems
    • Articulate how well ideologies describe real world problems and offer solutions to those problems.
    • Communicate awareness and understanding of key concepts in American government through written and/or oral expression
    • Present theoretical solutions to contemporary political and economic problems


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Psychology

  
  •  

    PSYC 099 Human Relations

    5 credits
    Course will cover essential communication and interpersonal skills desired in the work environment. Teamwork skills will be achieved through practical application.

    Prerequisites: ABED 045 , or ABED 046 , or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the basic steps in the communication process
    • Understand non-verbal communication and practice identifying non-verbal clues
    • Describe barriers to communication and explain how to overcome them
    • Develop improved listening skills
    • Identify the types of teams that characterize most organizations
    • Identify various team member roles
    • Select key leadership traits for personal/professional development
    • Describe how an individual can develop his/her leadership potential
    • Recognize his/her typical method of resolving conflict
    • Develop effective techniques for negotiating and resolving conflict
    • Recognize which groups and individuals fit under the diversity umbrella
    • Identify steps by which many cross-cultural barriers can be overcome
    • Describe how to combat racial and sexual harassment in the workplace
    • Recognize the importance of ethical behavior for establishing good interpersonal relations in the workplace
    • Identify job situations that present ethical dilemmas
    • Develop and use a systematic method for making ethical decisions
    • Discuss the importance of grooming and hygiene as it relates to his/her career
    • Discuss ways to balance work and family needs
    • Differentiate between short- and long-term goals
    • Describe goal-setting processes
    • Understand the impact of self-esteem on career and personal goals
    • Identify sources that contribute to self-esteem


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PSYC 324 Psychology of Organizations

    5 credits
    This course prepares the student to exercise effective leadership by learning positive psychology, negotiation and labor relations, strength-based management of individuals and teams, motivation/morale, and conflict resolution.

    Prerequisites: Admission to a baccalaureate program and PSYC& 100  or SOC& 101 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply practical expertise in selection of new employees, performance management, motivation, and work attitudes
    • Create a work environment that fosters employee well being and productivity by constructing cohesive work groups
    • Support cultural differences to improve the utilization of human capital and effectiveness of the organization
    • Evaluate sources of conflict to generate win-win negotiation
    • Analyze leadership and management styles and their impact on groups and individuals
    • Coach employees in career planning and development using practical application of the theories of adult learning and human behavior in the workplace


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PSYC 441 Psychology of Creativity

    5 credits
    This course is a close examination of creativity as a human trait. Issues of definition, identification, measurement, development, use, loss, and value in the design process are examined.

    Prerequisites: PSYC& 100  or equivalent. Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission.

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Evaluate measurements and outcomes of creativity
    • Identify obstacles to creativity in the design process and methods for overcoming them
    • Apply concepts and theories of creativity to the field of design
    • Describe characteristics of creative individuals
    • Identify characteristics of workplace environments that are conducive to facilitating creative processes
    • Appreciate cross-cultural perspectives of creativity


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PSYC& 100 General Psychology

    5 credits
    This course will introduce students to the principles of motivation, communication, human development and learning. Practical applications will be made to individual difference, group process and behavior in organizations.

    Prerequisites: ABED 045 , or ABED 046 , or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Correctly use basic psychological terminology, concepts, and theories
    • Describe how biological, psychological, social factors affect behavior
    • Critically analyze information about human behavior
    • Distinguish between scientific and non-scientific ways of knowing
    • Appreciate how psychology explains personal experience and social interaction
    • Explain how culture, gender, and group identity can influence self-awareness and relationships between and among groups
    • Develop, organize, implement, and present a term project


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology

    5 credits
    Students will learn the stages of human development from infancy throughout the life span. Stages will be discussed in terms of physical, social and psychological. Normal growth and development are discussed for each developmental stage. Also addressed are deviations from normal as behaviors which interfere with function. Practical applications are made.

    Prerequisites: ABED 045 , or ABED 046 , or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss the general concepts of human development and behavior
    • Understand basic psychological terminology, concepts, and theories
    • Describe how biological, psychological, and social factors affect behavior
    • Explain the developmental theories of Erickson, Piaget, Kohlberg, and others
    • Describe the physical, mental, emotional, and social developmental characteristics at each developmental stage throughout the life span
    • Describe possible blocks to normal growth and development at all stages
    • Define the critical periods in development
    • Explain the impact on the individual and the family when individuals have not developed along expected patterns
    • Describe the stages of death and dying as defined by Kubler-Ross


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PSYC& 220 Abnormal Psychology

    5 credits
    Students will learn to identify symptoms of abnormal psychological disorders and diagnostic classifications, including various models of treatment. Students will gain a better understanding of maladaptive behavior and its impact on individuals, families, and society. They will also acquire basic information regarding the identification and management of high-risk situations that may occur during the course of their work as a human service professional.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  or equivalent test score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define the four components of abnormal behavior
    • Compare and contrast the theoretical models of abnormal behavior
    • Differentiate between varieties of psychological disorders as defined in the DSM
    • Examine the role of the human service professional in working with clients with diagnosed psychological disorders
    • Describe the effects of maladaptive behavior on individuals, families, and society
    • Illustrate methods for de-escalating the angry/emotional client
    • Implement crisis management techniques
    • Analyze personal and professional limits and employ self-care to avoid burnout
    • Evaluate the impact of cultural norms on the determination of abnormal behavior


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Public Health

  
  •  

    CHPH 315 Mental Health and Addiction

    5 credits
    This course investigates the various perspectives describing and understanding mental health, mental health disorders and addictions, and interventions, including assessment, treatment, and self-help strategies within individual, group, family, and community contexts.

    Prerequisites: PUBH 310 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    CHPH 325 Health Equity and Social Justice

    5 credits
    This course analyzes issues related to health disparity, and issues related to social justice, such as healthcare access, unequal treatment based on ethnicity, race, income, and strategies for supporting diverse populations to reduce disparity and influence public policy.

    Prerequisites: PHIL 301 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    CHPH 435 Community Health Issues

    5 credits
    This course addresses issues in community health. It introduces strategies to reduce health risks, health disparity, and introduces resources for community intervention and prevention programs.

    Prerequisites: PUBH 401  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    CHPH 455 Service Learning in Community Health

    5 credits
    This course is designed to serve as a service learning experience. Students will collaborate with local agencies to develop a community health program. Students will also participate in a weekly meeting with students in other capstone courses from the other specializations to collaborate and share information and knowledge gained.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 110 Lecture Hours: 20 Practicum or Internship Hours: 90
  
  •  

    EPID 315 Statistical Research: Data Management & Analysis

    5 credits
    This course introduces statistical analysis software packages typically encountered in epidemiological research. Students will develop data analysis techniques for dataset analysis for the various software packages.

    Prerequisites: MATH 341 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    EPID 325 Advanced Principles of Epidemiology

    5 credits
    This course is designed to train students to apply epidemiological principles to determine disease etiology as well as evaluate prevention and intervention programs. It will do so in the context of the five areas of epidemiology: environmental health, biostatistics, epidemiology, social and behavior sciences, and health management and policy.

    Prerequisites: PUBH 320  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    EPID 435 Field Epidemiology

    5 credits
    This course allows students the opportunity to conduct epidemiological field studies, gaining a better understanding and appreciation of survey methodology. Students learn techniques and acquire resources needed to design and carry out the field portion of an epidemiological investigation, including staff recruitment and training; counting and listing techniques; enumeration methodologies; subject recruitment, retention, and tracking; data storage and management; and general survey instrument issues.

    Prerequisites: EPID 325  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    EPID 455 Applications of Epidemiology

    5 credits
    This course is designed to serve as an epidemiology capstone experience. Students will work with local agencies and health departments engaged in health surveillance and monitoring on projects that may include data analysis and application, using GIS mapping tools and related software, field observations, and community assessment. Students will also participate in a weekly meeting with students in other capstone courses from the other specializations to collaborate and share information and knowledge gained.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 110 Lecture Hours: 20 Practicum or Internship Hours: 90
  
  •  

    GEOG 340 Introduction to Health Geography

    5 credits
    This course introduces students to core concepts in health geography, including spatial and social determinants of health, health systems, and health disparities. This includes introduction to methods in program design, research and evaluation, and data visualization and presentation.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    POLS 430 Public Health Policy

    5 credits
    This course examines public health policy at the local, state, and federal level. It investigates the many factors that influence public policy such as institutional, economic, social, ethical, and political factors.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

  
  •  

    PUBH 301 Foundations of Public Health

    5 credits
    This course will introduce the foundations of various specializations in public health including chronic and infectious epidemiology, behavioral and social epidemiology, community health, molecular and genetic epidemiology, etc. Students will develop a broad understanding of how these specializations address public health issues across the globe by this introduction to the fundamental principles, concepts, and tools used in various public health disciplines.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss the history, mission, and goals of public health
    • Investigate core specializations in public health including epidemiology, community health, and biostatistics
    • Explore key concepts of public health, including morbidity and mortality, infectious and chronic disease, social determinants of health, and health disparities within populations
    • Discuss the major issues and strategies for health promotion and disease prevention
    • Explain the role of public health professionals in addressing the public’s health
    • Investigate the role of governments and health policy in public health
    • Compare and contrast public health efforts locally, nationally, and globally


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PUBH 310 Theories of Health Behavior

    5 credits
    This course will introduce various health behavior theories (personal, social, and population-based) and their roles in health education, research, and intervention.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PUBH 320 Principles of Epidemiology

    5 credits
    An introduction to epidemiological investigations of disease (infectious and noninfectious). Includes introduction to study design for investigating disease etiology, mode of transmission, and pathogenesis.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PUBH 330 Healthcare Structure and Leadership

    5 credits
    This course presents core concepts of healthcare structure and leadership, including organizational design as it relates to workplace diversity, managing versus leading professionals, and overall system function.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PUBH 401 Behavioral and Social Aspects of Public Health

    5 credits
    This course introduces behavior and cultural issues that impact individual and population health and their relationship to public policy development and public health intervention programs.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This courses teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PUBH 402 Principles of Public Health Communication

    5 credits
    This course introduces fundamental aspects of public health communication and education. Topics include general marketing principles, the role of social and mass media, interpersonal, organizational, and cultural aspects of communication, and communication technology.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PUBH 410 Public Health Theory, Research Methods, and Design

    5 credits
    This course focuses on research methodology and design. Students will collect and analyze data to evaluate programs related to public health and healthcare issues.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PUBH 420 Program Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation

    5 credits
    This course introduces the phases of evidence-based approaches to educational and promotional programs: community needs assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation. Students will also learn about the competitive grant process and component necessary for writing successful proposals.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Sewing

  
  •  

    SEW 110 Sewing for Beginners I

    1 credit
    This course is for those who have never sewn before. Students will learn sewing machine usage and care and how to select proper sewing tools/supplies and fabrics for the various projects.

    Prerequisites: None

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify parts of a sewing machine   
    • Use a sewing machine to complete class projects
    • Demonstrate various sewing skills, including gathering fabric, threading a needle, quilter’s knot, sewing on a button, layering fabrics, rotary cutting equipment, French seam, closing a seam, and basic quilting


    Total Hours: 15 Lecture Hours: 5 Lab or Clinical Hours: 10
  
  •  

    SEW 111 Sewing Lab

    2 credits
    This course is for students interested in garment sewing. It is ideal for students who have not sewn recently and want to brush up on their skills. It is also for students who want to tackle more difficult projects with expert guidance. Students will be provided techniques and tips through emergent needs. Students work on projects of their choice and at their own pace. Can be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: None

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Safely operate sewing machines and equipment
    • Calculate body size and seam allowances
    • Identify properties of good fit
    • Evaluate fabric-pattern compatibility
    • Construct garments to professional standards
    • Select appropriate finishing techniques for each project


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    SEW 112 Quilts, Quick Projects, and More

    1 credit
    This course covers various methods for piecing curves/circles and zipper play.

    Prerequisites: Some sewing experience; familiarity with a sewing machine and rotary cutters

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate and explain the steps to create a paper foundation pieced block
    • Demonstrate curve piecing
    • Take apart and install zippers


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    SEW 113 Quilt Basics and Beyond

    1 credit
    This course covers the basics of quilting from color and fabric selection to pattern drafting, as well as hand and machine piecing and appliqué techniques, setting blocks, hand quilting, and finishing techniques.

    Prerequisites: None

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate basic quilting skills, including
      • Fabric and color selection
      • Template construction and use
      • Quilt tool use
      • A variety of hand and machine techniques
      • Hand quilting
      • Setting blocks and sashing construction
      • Basting quilt “sandwich”
      • Binding construction
    • Produce a quilt top
    • Create a hand-quilting sample


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    SEW 114 Intermediate/Advanced Quilting

    1 credit
    This course builds upon basic quilting skills. Students will have various projects from which to choose while learning new techniques. 

    Prerequisites: SEW 113  or equivalent class/experience recommended

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate intermediate/advanced quilting skills, including, but not limited to
      • Rotary cutting techniques
      • Accurate seams and pressing techniques
      • Fabric selection for quilts and fabric exchange
      • Various row-by-row block construction techniques (specific to Fall quarter)           
      • Double wedding ring quilt construction (specific to Fall quarter)


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

Social and Human Services

  
  •  

    SHSV 110 Introduction to Social and Human Services

    5 credits


    The student will receive an introduction to the field of Social and Human services, including the history, philosophy, and current delivery systems to a diverse client population.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 099  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the historical development of human services and the changing philosophies in the field of social service
    • Appreciate individual strengths and weaknesses in their clients and themselves
    • Recognize and strengthen effective team-building skills in self and others
    • Evaluate the variety of practical skills connected with the multiple roles required, e.g. direct service provider, community liaison, and administrator/manager
    • Model effective interpersonal communication skills i.e. verbal, written, and non-verbal, as they relate to client interaction
    • Design an initial system of information and resource management
    • Assess individual client needs through problem solving and critical thinking
    • Research and interpret professional journals and other sources to identify potential grant opportunities


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

  
  •  

    SHSV 120 Case Management and Systems

    5 credits
    Students will examine the roles and functions of case managers including interviewing, assessment and record keeping in a variety of social service systems.

    Prerequisites: SHSV 110  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interview clients to assess strengths and weaknesses
    • Create a client file using at least two different documentation systems
    • Refer clients appropriately to non-profit community resources
    • Navigate technical software used in case management
    • Diagram the basic language and components needed in successful grant writing
    • Document the required HIV/AIDS information
    • Describe a presenting problem and develop a case write-up
    • Present a case in a staff meeting
    • Research and develop agency reports


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    SHSV 130 Therapeutic Approaches & Techniques

    5 credits
    The student will examine the roles and functions of the helping professional through the study of principles, concepts, and processes related to interaction with clients.

    Prerequisites: SHSV 110  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon the successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Examine and apply the theory and research foundations of the helping process
    • Articulate the principles of the integrated helping model
    • Interact with clients using the three stage model, i.e. exploration, insight, and action     
    • Evaluate the effectiveness of their helping skills throughout the client relationship
    • Appraise individual strengths and weaknesses which they bring to the helping process


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    SHSV 136 Issues in Aging: Boomers and Beyond

    5 credits
    This course covers the biological, sociological and psychological processes involved in the aging process. Social policies, housing, caregiving resources and community services will also be explored.

    Prerequisites: SHSV 110  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Evaluate the major biological theories of human aging
    • Analyze the impact of the growing senior population
    • Explain the sociological issues presented by a growing number of those over 70 years of age
    • Identify the normal age-related psychological changes in cognitive functions, personality and interpersonal relationships
    • Differentiate between normal and abnormal aging in terms of personality, cognition and general functioning
    • Critique selected public policies (local, state, federal) for the provision of social programs for seniors
    • Recognize unique concerns of seniors such as elder abuse, and develop appropriate referral procedures
    • Determine when additional social services are needed and create a resource of agencies which provide services to this population
    • Navigate a variety of support services available  for seniors, professional caregivers and family


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    SHSV 138 Field Practicum I

    5 credits
    Students will learn to apply basic skills and knowledge gained in previous course work through supervised field placement in a social service agency. In addition, students will attend a weekly seminar for debriefing, assessment, and supervision of their field placement.

    Prerequisites: SHSV 110  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interact effectively with moderate supervision with prospective clients
    • Clearly explain the process of accessing services to clients
    • Interact collaboratively and professionally with the agency staff
    • Provide general information to the public with accuracy and enthusiasm
    • Maintain confidentiality of client information, such as test scores, grades, disability, and personal concerns
    • Develop a resource directory of referral agencies


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Practicum or Internship Hours: 60
  
  •  

    SHSV 140 Disability Issues & Practice

    5 credits
    The student will identify the major categories of disability and the functional limitations of each. Vocational, psychological and educational impacts on the individual, family and community will be examined.

    Prerequisites: SHSV 110  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Analyze the historical and political development of the disability rights movement in the United States
    • Incorporate sensitivity, respect, and cultural appreciation into their interaction with those individuals with disabilities and their families
    • Interpret the American with Disabilities Act  (ADA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1974, and other legislation as they impact disability rights and accommodation to their clients
    • Define the terms specific to disability law and support services
    • Maintain currency in the decisions of the federal and state courts with regard to disability rights and accommodations
    • Identify at least 6 categories of disability, including the functional limitations and defining characteristics of each                        
    • Analyze case studies to determine appropriate accommodations applied in the workplace and classroom
    • Assess  the needs of clients with disabling conditions as they access social services
    • Develop a resource bank of services that support individuals with disabilities


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    SHSV 146 Leadership Development & Ethics

    5 credits
    The student will develop a basic understanding of leadership principles, qualities, practices, and ethics. Students will also acquire personal leadership skills and philosophies.

    Prerequisites: SHSV 110  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define leadership and recognize leadership styles in a variety of human service agencies
    • Identify and describe leadership roles in a variety of human services settings
    • Evaluate personal and organizational vision
    • Describe the problem solving and critical thinking skills required for effective leadership
    • Apply leadership strategies for dealing with a changing and diverse workforce
    • Model high ethical standards and codes of conduct
    • Analyze ethical dilemmas and apply ethical criterion in handling them
    • Generate opportunities to enhance leadership skills


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    SHSV 210 Group Process & Dynamics

    5 credits
    The student will learn effectiveness of groups by using a variety of roles, models and norms of the group process. Student will participate as group members and develop group leadership skills through co-facilitation of group using appropriate strategies and activities.

    Prerequisites: SHSV 110  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the value and effectiveness of the group process in social and human services.
    • Explain the task oriented, maintenance, and individual roles of group members
    • Analyze three styles of group leadership
    • Apply their individual style of group leadership to a variety of groups
    • Identify and describe the four stages of group development
    • Analyze individual goal-related behavior and communication styles
    • Evaluate their individual strengths and weaknesses in handling conflict constructively
    • Participate effectively as group members with role flexibility
    • Plan and implement effective group activities


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    SHSV 212 Introduction to Chemical Dependency

    5 credits
    The student will examine the effects of psychoactive drugs, theories of addiction, and major classes of drugs. The student will learn to effectively address chemical dependency issues in the social service environment.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define psychoactive drugs and chemical dependency
    • Explain the physiological and psychological effects of psychoactive drugs
    • Analyze chemical dependency risk factors within diverse population groups
    • Identify protective factors that reduce the risk for drug abuse
    • Analyze major theories of addiction
    • Explain major classifications of drugs including depressants, stimulants, and hallucinogens , and the acute and chronic effects of a variety of drugs in each class
    • Evaluate the dynamics of drug interactions
    • Apply diagnostic criteria for chemical dependency
    • Compare and contrast the various forms of treatments for chemical dependency
    • Apply research to maintain currency in legal and ethical issues applicable to chemical dependency prevention, intervention, and treatment


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    SHSV 218 Field Practicum II

    5 credits
    Students will learn to apply intermediate skills and knowledge with direct supervision in a field placement in a social service agency. In addition, students will attend a weekly seminar for debriefing, assessment, and supervision of their field placement.

    Prerequisites: SHSV 138  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform intake assessments of prospective clients with minimal supervision
    • Effectively refer clients to appropriate services
    • Collaborate with agency staff on client issues
    • Maintain confidentiality of client information, such as test scores, grades, disability, and personal concerns


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Practicum or Internship Hours: 60
  
  •  

    SHSV 222 Multicultural Counseling

    5 credits
    Multicultural communication skills are essential in the social and human services field. The student will develop multicultural mindfulness so they can work effectively with diverse client populations.

    Prerequisites: SHSV 110  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply personal insight regarding the majority culture when interacting with clients
    • Describe and appreciate minority cultures in America
    • Interact effectively with clients within the context of racial, cultural, ethnic, and linguistic differences
    • Analyze the impact of social primary and secondary institutions on diverse communities
    • Question and reflect upon personal privilege and ethnocentric view
    • Identify the impact of historical events on major ethnic groups in America
    • Appreciate and affirm the differences and similarities of individuals
    • Model cultural appreciation and strive toward personal cultural competence


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    SHSV 238 Field Practicum III

    5 credits
    Students will apply advanced skills and knowledge gained in previous internships and course work with minimal supervision in a field placement. Each successive internship placement will give the student the opportunity to experience various career options.

    Prerequisites: SHSV 218  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interact effectively with individuals and groups of clients with minimal supervision
    • Participate in staffing conferences by sharing feedback on client interaction
    • Develop and maintain a professional network of community personnel
    • Maintain confidentiality of client information, such as test scores, grades, disability, and personal concerns
    • Conduct intake interviews and document pertinent information in agency’s system of documentation
    • Compare and contrast agency demographics with those of the surrounding community to implement a problem solving approach to social issues


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Practicum or Internship Hours: 60

Sociology

  
  •  

    SOC 205 Civic Engagement

    5 credits


    Students use a variety of research methods to explore civic engagement processes. Major topics include human and civil rights, citizen impact on public policy, and media literacy. Students engage in a service learning project at a community organization throughout the course.

    Civic engagement is the active participation of individuals and communities in processes, structures, and policies aimed at promoting the greater social good. Students will use a variety of qualitative research methods to explore the multiple avenues of civic engagement processes. Major topics will include human and civil rights, citizen impact on public policy, and media literacy as a foundational aspect of a democracy. Students will be engaged in a service learning project at a community organization throughout the quarter as part of a cumulative project they design to address a social problem of their choice.

    Prerequisites: ENGL& 101 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe historical, economic, and political components of key civic issues
    • Examine institutional challenges to civic engagement and equitable public policy implementation such as inequality and disproportionate representation of corporate interests in the political system
    • Utilize media literacy tools to identify misinformation and under reporting of important civic topics, as well as to find credible sources of accurate information on such topics.
    • Identify their own skill sets, interests, and aptitudes and assess how those personal attributes can be used in civic engagement service for addressing social and community problems
    • Utilize a variety of qualitative research methods to collect data about civic engagement issues
    • Engage in fieldwork (service learning) on a social issue in the community
    • Develop, organize, and present a term project on a proposed solution to a community problem


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 40 Practicum or Internship Hours: 30

  
  •  

    SOC 260 Sociology of Death and Dying

    5 credits
    This course explores social, cultural, political, and economic aspects of death and dying. Cross-cultural comparisons, social stratification, rituals, taboos, and current social policy debates will be examined.

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology

    5 credits
    This course is an introduction to the set of perspectives on human life that allows us to understand how the events and experiences of our personal lives are affected by social institutions, group dynamics, historic forces, and cultural meanings.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain basic sociological terminology, concepts, and theories
    • Identify the major socializing agents for children 
    • Critically analyze information about human behavior
    • Distinguish between scientific and non-scientific ways of knowing
    • Describe how culture, gender, and group identity can influence self-awareness and relationships between and among groups
    • Identify the ways in which culture and social institutions (such as education, the economy, the media, and the family) shape our everyday experiences
    • Distinguish between factual statements and value judgments
    • Demonstrate an awareness of the negative effects of ethnocentric reasoning
    • Apply sociological knowledge to real-life situations
    • Describe how life experiences and opportunities may differ according to race, class, and gender


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    SOCI 230 Technology & Society

    5 credits
    An overview of the changing roles technology has played in relation to multiple aspects of human society including social groups, institutions, and societal problems. Topics covered may include, but are not limited to, the relationship between technology and work, education, art, gender, “invention”, commerce, music, warfare, “progress”, disasters, environment, government, entertainment, and the future. Particular emphasis will be placed on technologies significant to the Pacific Northwest and LWIT programs.

    Prerequisites: ABED 045  or ABED 046  or equivalent placement test score.

    Total Hours: 55 Lecture Hours: 55
  
  •  

    SOCI 401 Behavioral and Cultural Issues in Healthcare

    5 credits
    This course introduces behavior and cultural issues that impact individual and population health and their relationship to public policy development and public health intervention programs.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Spanish

  
  •  

    SPAN& 121 Spanish I

    5 credits
    An introduction to the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Students develop skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify parts of speech by showing vocabulary recognition, identifying cognates, classifying verbs, describing nouns, understanding noun-adjective and noun-verb agreements
    • Demonstrate listening ability by answering comprehension questions in the target language
    • Demonstrate speaking ability by responding correctly through original oral dialogues through role plays
    • Demonstrate reading comprehension by answering questions orally and in writing after reading a passage in the target language and make educated guesses by using cognates and context to understand meaning
    • Demonstrate writing ability by creating grammatically correct sentences, short descriptive paragraphs and short summaries from readings
    • Identify and differentiate among cultures of the Spanish-speaking world at a basic level


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    SPAN& 122 Spanish II

    5 credits
    This course is a continuation of skills learned in SPAN& 121 .

    Prerequisites: SPAN& 121 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an awareness of diverse cultures of the Spanish-speaking world at an intermediate level
    • Identify parts of speech by showing vocabulary recognition, identifying cognates, classifying verbs, describing nouns, understanding noun-adjective and noun-verb agreements
    • Demonstrate listening ability by answering comprehension questions in the target language
    • Demonstrate speaking ability by responding correctly through original oral dialogues through role plays
    • Demonstrate reading comprehension by answering questions orally and in writing after reading a passage in the target language and make educated guesses by using cognates and context to understand meaning
    • Demonstrate writing ability by creating grammatically correct sentences, short descriptive paragraphs and short summaries from readings
    • Show an awareness of diverse cultures of the Spanish-speaking world at an intermediate level


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    SPAN& 123 Spanish III

    5 credits
    This course is a continuation of skills learned in SPAN& 122 .

    Prerequisites: SPAN& 122 .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify parts of speech by showing vocabulary recognition, classifying verbs, understanding indirect and direct object pronouns, discerning appropriate prepositions and formulating subject-verb agreements
    • Produce appropriate vocabulary in the target language by creating and understanding descriptive sentences using both past tenses, the present perfect tense and the subjunctive
    • Demonstrate listening ability by answering comprehension questions in the target language
    • Demonstrate speaking ability by responding correctly through dialogues and creating original oral dialogues
    • Demonstrate reading comprehension by answering questions orally and in writing after reading a passage in the target language by using context to understand meaning
    • Demonstrate writing ability by creating descriptive paragraphs and writing summaries from readings
    • Show an awareness of diverse cultures of the Spanish-speaking world at an advanced level.


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Transportation, Logistics, and Supply Chain Management

  
  •  

    TLM 301 Introduction to Transportation and Logistics Management

    5 credits
    Course explores the organization and operations of the commercial transportation and logistics industry and its impact on the bottom-line of today’s modern businesses in the context of the global trading economy.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASTLM program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the historical relationship of all modes of transportation
    • Categorize the major modes of transportation, and explain the economic and environmental considerations when choosing a transportation mode for moving goods
    • Analyze the political, economic, and social trends that impact the transportations/logistics functions
    • Identify and explain import and export processes
    • Discuss the importance of regulation and policy procedures, laws, and/or measures that affect the import and export processes
    • Identify and explain impact of technology on the functions of warehouse and inventory management
    • Report current issues in the transportation industry including, but not limited to, security issues and policy considerations
    • Explore career opportunities within the transportation/logistics industry
    • Prioritize technologies and issues that will shape the future of transportation and logistics
    • Communicate research findings verbally and by writing


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    TLM 302 Airline, Airport, and Seaport Management

    5 credits
    This course provides an overview of airline economic structure, government regulation, and strategies and management functions, including pricing and revenue management. Airport and seaport management issues and challenges are discussed, and critical interface with private sector intermediaries and government regulatory agencies that facilitate and affect operations are examined.

    Prerequisites: TLM 301 ECON 310 , and admission to the BASTLM program.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the characteristics and strategic management issues in the domestic airline industry
    • Explore the history and growth of seaports and airports in the United States
    • Identify and explain the various functions performed by an airport manager
    • Evaluate the organizations, jobs, and equipment that contribute to the operation of an airport and seaport
    • Examine the flow of materials, people, baggage, and cargo through modern airports and seaports
    • Compare and contrast the regulatory bodies, associations, policies, procedures, and laws that impact airport and seaport operations, including security aspect
    • Analyze the role of airports and seaports in global trade and  economic development


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    TLM 304 Domestic and International Freight Management

    5 credits
    This course focuses on an in-depth study of a wide range of transportation issues facing managers from the perspectives of both carriers and users, in the various modes and in inter modal settings, in today’s global economy. Current US and international transportation issues, including strategies, financing, achieving sustainable competitive advantage, government policies and promotion as well as security aspects, are reviewed and analyzed from a supply chain perspective.

    Prerequisites: TLM 301 ECON 310 , and admission to the BASTLM program.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and explain the operating and the economic characteristics of domestic and international freight services
    • Critique the issues and impacts of domestic and international freight policies on individual businesses, industry, and economies
    • Formulate and discuss potential solutions to real and hypothetical issues/managerial challenges


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    TLM 305 Legal Concepts for Transportation and Logistics Management

    5 credits
    This course outlines the legal issues and concepts germane to the Transportation and Logistics field, including contracts, liability, torts, insurance requirements, jurisdiction, environmental and security regulatory compliance, mediation, and legal remedies.

    Prerequisites: TLM 301  and admission to the BASTLM program.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Determine legal rights and responsibilities of firms involved in the movement of goods, including liability, tracking, delivery, stowage, packing, demurrage, and despatch
    • Determine legal rights and responsibilities of firms involved in sales, maintenance, purchase, or disposal of vehicles, including product safety recalls and retrofits, warranty obligations and repair compliance, and environmental protection mandates
    • Analyze the liability and responsibility chain for an international intermodal shipment
    • Identify the process for legal remedies in the case of damaged shipments, liability claims, or employment matters
    • Discuss relevant legal concepts and terminology


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    TLM 306 Quality and Operations Management

    5 credits
    This course is designed to equip students with the managerial concepts and quantitative tools used in effective and efficient management of operations, including quality control, in manufacturing and service organizations. The focus of this course is on operations concepts, problem solving, problem definition, evaluation of alternatives, implementation, and total quality standards and management.

    Prerequisites: TLM 301 MATH 246 , and admission to the BASTLM program.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply the philosophies of Total Quality Management
    • Apply statistical quality control methodology and identify appropriate process improvements
    • Analyze various operations management concepts and practices and how these could be utilized by the firm to gain sustainable competitive advantage


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    TLM 404 Warranty Administration

    5 credits
    This course investigates the various federal and state laws and regulations impacting the operations of the automotive wholesale and retail business, and warranty policies. Course will include discussions with attorneys and vehicle manufacturer representatives.

    Prerequisites: TLM 301 BUS& 201 , and admission to the BASTLM program.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Analyze warranty policies of automotive manufacturers
    • Appraise warranty decisions and laws covering warranties, including preventing buyback
    • Determine warranty and goodwill processes to increase customer satisfaction and retention


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    TLM 414 Warehousing and Distribution Center Management

    5 credits
    The student learns basic marketing concepts and warehouse and distribution center management systems, including materials management software, inventory fundamentals, and order fulfillment.

    Prerequisites: TLM 301 ECON 310 , and admission to the BASTLM program.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Examine the basic concepts of marketing and the role of distribution and warehousing in achieving marketing and supply chain goals
    • Describe warehouse environment, including distribution planning and control
    • Assess inventory information systems, managerial tools, and techniques used in inventory management
    • Formulate master schedules and capacity management plans in conjunction with operation/production area
    • Determine the best, most cost effective way to transport goods/in-process materials
    • Assess the impact of Kan-Ban, Just-In-Time and other production methodologies on  warehousing and distribution system operations.


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    TLM 415 Supply Chain Management and Technologies

    5 credits
    This course acquaints students with the global supply chain, with an emphasis on supply sources, distribution, production planning, information systems, customer service, inventory management, warehouse management, supply chain relationships and challenges facing managers today. Students completing the course will be able to understand supply chain management concepts and strategies that help firms become more responsive in today’s changing global markets and provide a key source of competitive advantage. They will learn strategies for outsourcing, distribution, production planning, customer service, inventory management, warehouse management, and the use of 3PL and 4PL providers in the supply chain. In addition, the class acquaints students to currently applicable technologies and how firms gain competitive advantages by embracing and adapting RFID, bar coding, sorting, picking, and track and trace technologies into their supply chains. Uses examples from retail, pharmaceutical, defense, manufacturing, and logistics industries.

    Prerequisites: TLM 301  and admission to the BASTLM program.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply supply chain management concepts and strategies
    • Describe warehouse management, materials handling and packaging issues
    • Integrate logistics management with quality customer service
    • Utilize strategic service response logistics and reverse logistics
    • Compare and contrast domestic and international transportation costs, benefits, and processes
    • Apply management and production scheduling to the supply chain
    • Identify future challenges in supply chain management and apply critical thought and analysis to propose potential solutions


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    TLM 416 Applied Supply Chain Technologies

    5 credits
    This course focuses on currently applicable technologies and how firms gain competitive advantages by embracing and adapting RFID, bar coding, sorting, picking, and track and trace technologies into their supply chains.  Uses examples from retail, pharmaceutical, defense, manufacturing, and logistics industries.

    Prerequisites: TLM 301  and admission to the BASTLM program.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss current supply chain technologies and analyze the advantages and disadvantages of each.
    • Choose the appropriate technology and scope of application for a given product or site
    • Discuss the development of metrics to assess effectiveness of applied technological systems
    • Compare and analyze different vendors’ supply chain management software packages
    • Explain whether and/or when to enhance and upgrade legacy systems or to embrace new technology


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    TLM 422 Finance, Vehicle Fleet Risk, and Asset Management

    5 credits


    This course deals with planning for uncertain events as well as the life cycle of fleets. It will focus on industry best practices. The course will include discussions with risk managers, and public and private fleet managers.

    Prerequisites: TLM 301 ACCT 301 , and admission to the BASTLM program.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform time value of money calculations
    • Apply capital budgeting techniques
    • Value riskless and risky assets
    • Explain the responsibilities involved with fleet maintenance including safety, environmental compliance, and the financial bottom line
    • Assess the role of the fleet manager in the selection, procurement, use, care and disposal of fleet vehicle and equipment assets
    • Develop strategies for controlling risk and effectively minimizing and handling loss

     

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

  
  •  

    TLM 430 Transportation Economics

    5 credits
    This course deals with the economic characteristics of the provision of transportation services, both passenger and freight. Students will also examine transportation policy concerns with an emphasis on externalities and relevant regulations.

    Prerequisites: TLM 301 ECON 310 , and admission to the BASTLM program.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply the concepts and tools of microeconomics to conduct independent research on transportation economics
    • Analyze the efficiency of transportation markets
    • Examine how policy makers address transportation-related issues
    • Analyze how economic principles work in a particular sector of the economy


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    TLM 435 Shipping and International Logistics

    5 credits
    This course examines the characteristics and role of shipping services in the design and management of international logistics systems.

    Prerequisites: TLM 301 ECON 310 , and admission to the TLM program.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Examine the history and operation of shipping conferences and cartels
    • Analyze current and prospective economic, regulatory, and environmental issues in international shipping and logistics
    • Examine current and prospective developments in international shipping and logistics


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    TLM 444 Capstone Project/Strategic Management

    5 credits
    This course provides an opportunity for students to conduct independent research on a wide array of strategic issues in transportation management, either individually or in teams. Requires a written report and oral presentation of the research findings. Alternately, the course can focus on strategic management in transportation/logistics.

    Prerequisites: TLM 302 , TLM 404  or TLM 414 , TLM 415  or TLM 422 , and admission to the BASTLM program.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Examine strategic management/policy concepts and applications in the transportation /logistics industry
    • Analyze in-depth a strategic facet of transportation management of relevance and interest to the student
    • Evaluate, analyze, and report on relevant data gathered using critical thought processes and current research methodologies


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Transportation Core

  
  •  

    TRAN 110 Computer Basics/Transportation Trades

    2 credits
    This course focuses on computer basics, keyboarding, and industry applications.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Corequisites: TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125  

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

    • Start up and shut down a computer properly
    • Operate Windows and Word programs
    • Save documents properly
    • Use the internet and Microsoft word to develop a trade applicable Hazardous Materials notebook and resume template.


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10