Catalog 2017-2018 
    
    Mar 03, 2021  
Catalog 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Civil Design and Engineering Technology

  
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    CIVL 101 Civil Engineering Fundamentals

    4 credits
    This course is an overview of the engineering profession with emphasis on the civil engineering discipline and the role of the civil engineering team. The course introduces selected aspects of the history, philosophy, methodology, tools, and contemporary topics in civil engineering.

    Prerequisites: CADE 101 , CADE 102 , CADE 103 , and CADE 104  

    Corequisites: CADE 131 , CADE 132 , and CIVL 102  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CIVL 102 Current Topics in Civil Engineering

    3 credits


    This course covers introductory lecture topics, such as sustainable development, environmental and societal impact, the project development process, standards and codes, and engineering ethics. The course explores current and new technical developments in civil engineering through class discussion, hands-on activities, site tours, and presentations by industry experts.

    Prerequisites: CADE 101 , CADE 102 , CADE 103 , and CADE 104  

    Corequisites: CADE 131 , CADE 132 , and CIVL 101  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CIVL 103 Construction Materials

    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to the typical materials used in a civil engineering and construction projects.  The materials studied include concrete, asphalt, rock, PVC, steel, and soil.  It is an introduction to the practices and procedures for the testing and placement of construction materials. This course covers basic steel stress, strain, and thermal expansion, as well as in depth testing and placing of soil, aggregate, asphalt and concrete. Also discussed are standard inspection practices and construction documentation during and after the construction of sewer, water, storm, and roadway civil improvements.

    Prerequisites: CADE 131 , CADE 132 , CIVL 101 , and CIVL 102  

    Corequisites: CIVL 231  

    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CIVL 105 Introduction to Surveying

    4 credits


    This course covers fundamental principles of plane surveying methods and equipment used in civil engineering and construction. Topics include use of tape, level, and electronic total station, along with horizontal and vertical control networks. This is a hands-on class and students will be exposed to practical surveying applications. Students should plan on outdoor activities and dress accordingly.

    Certificate students who wish to take this course as a technical elective will need instructor permission to do so.

    Prerequisites: CADE 131 , CADE 132 , CIVL 101 , CIVL 102 , and MATH 111  

    Corequisites: CIVL 103 , CIVL 107 , CIVL 231 , and PHYS& 114  

    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    CIVL 107 Sustainability in Civil Engineering

    3 credits


    This course introduces the goals, principles, and practical applications of sustainability from science/engineering. The course emphasizes sustainability as an approach in civil engineering projects that focuses on the long lasting improvement of the human condition. Also covered is how sustainable engineering principles and practices can transform the traditional design and construction methods of complex systems by the application of life cycle and environmental assessment, risk, and uncertainty analysis and other emerging techniques.

    Certificate students who wish to take this course as a technical elective will need instructor permission to do so.

    Prerequisites: CADE 131 , CADE 132 , CIVL 101 , CIVL 102 , and MATH 111  

    Corequisites: CIVL 103 , CIVL 105 , CIVL 231 , and PHYS& 114  

    Quarters Offered: Cohort 1: Spring

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CIVL 201 Engineering Statistics

    4 credits
    This course reviews the basic principles of probability and statistics in engineering. Topics include measure of central tendencies and dispersions, probability, confidence level, linear regression, hypothesis test, etc.

    Prerequisites: CIVL 103 , CIVL 105 , CIVL 107 , and PHYS& 114  

    Corequisites: CIVL 204 , CIVL 232 , and ENGL& 101  

    Quarters Offered: Cohort 1: Fall

  
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    CIVL 204 Statics Fundamentals

    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to typical gravitational and lateral simple systems found in civil engineering. The course covers fundamental concepts of mechanics relating to forces acting on rigid bodies. Included are problems involving actions and reactions on structures and machines in two and three dimensions. Also covers friction, moments of inertia, and centroids.

    Prerequisites: CIVL 103 , CIVL 105 , CIVL 107 , and PHYS& 114  

    Corequisites: CIVL 201 , CIVL 232 , and ENGL& 101  

    Quarters Offered: Cohort 1: Fall

  
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    CIVL 205 Theory of Urban Design and Planning

    3 credits
    This course provides an overview of the historical development of American cities; the history and theories of planning; the uses of and problems with the most common planning tools; zoning; and a variety of significant contemporary issues in planning including Smart Growth, New Urbanism, Energy, and Sustainability. Critical thinking, writing, and sketching to investigate issues of importance in environmental and urban design and planning including lectures, reading and research assignments are used to expand awareness of good planning values and principles. Students will research and develop design solutions to a real-world urban planning issue.

    Prerequisites: CIVL 232  

    Corequisites: CIVL 206  

  
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    CIVL 206 Strength of Materials

    4 credits
    This course introduces the concepts of engineering mechanics of materials and the behavior of the materials and structures under applied loads. The course elaborates on the knowledge of engineering mechanics (statics) and teaches students the purpose of studying strength of materials with respect to civil engineering design and analysis. Engineering concepts of stress, strain, material properties, shear and bending moment diagrams, and torsion are explored with practical applications in civil engineering.

    Prerequisites: CIVL 232 

    Corequisites: CIVL 205 

    Quarters Offered: Cohort 1: Winter

  
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    CIVL 208 Civil Engineering Project

    5 credits


    This course incorporates project-based learning and allows students to develop critical thinking and engineering problem solving skills by researching, exploring and proposing solutions to current civil engineering problems. The course will engage students into the broad spectra of challenges and contemporary issues in civil and environmental engineering especially with regard to sustainability and design. Students work individually or on a team, explore and document the process of their work through sketches, study models, and design, and present their drawings, applying skills learned previously in the classroom to current civil engineering challenges facing the civil engineering industry. Students have ability to collaborate with other civil, architectural, and/or mechanical students.

    Certificate students who wish to take this course as a technical elective will need instructor permission to do so.

    Prerequisites: CIVL 205 , CIVL 206 , and CIVL 225  

    Corequisites: CADE 202  

  
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    CIVL 225 Construction Management - Civil Engineering

    4 credits
    This course covers fundamentals of construction management, basic terminology, and processes of estimating and managing projects for civil engineering and construction projects. This is a project-base course. Students may have an opportunity for collaboration with other industry related disciplines in the course.

    Prerequisites: CIVL 201 , CIVL 204 , CIVL 232 , and ENGL& 101  

    Corequisites: CIVL 205  and CIVL 206  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

  
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    CIVL 231 Civil 3D Computer Aided Design I

    4 credits
    A course in advanced civil engineering graphics using state of the art Civil 3D software. Students learn coordinate geometry, digital terrain modeling and design methods using profiles, cross sections, and templates.

    Prerequisites: CADE 131 , CADE 132 , CIVL 101 , CIVL 102 , and MATH 111  

    Corequisites: CIVL 103 , CIVL 105 , CIVL 107 , and PHYS& 114  

    Quarters Offered: Cohort 1: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate file management abilities by naming, saving and backing up files using 3D software
    • Manage coordinate systems by creating geometry
    • Create digital terrain models from given data
    • Analyze volumes and sites from created data


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CIVL 232 Civil 3D Computer Aided Design II

    4 credits
    A course in advanced civil engineering graphics using state of the art Civil 3D software. Students learn advanced terrain design, grading and profiling techniques and calculations. Continuation of Civil 3D Computer Aided Design I.

    Prerequisites: CIVL 103  and CIVL 231  

    Quarters Offered: Cohort 1: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate advanced file management abilities by naming, saving and backing up files
    • Manage coordinate systems by creating advanced geometry
    • Create complex digital terrain models from given data
    • Analyze volumes and sites from complex data


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CIVL 233 Civil 3D Computer Aided Design III

    4 credits
    A course in advanced civil engineering graphics using state of the art Civil 3D software. Students work on advanced design projects. Continuation of CIVL 232 .

    Prerequisites: CIVL 232  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Manage coordinate systems by creating complex geometry layouts
    • Create professional digital terrain models to industry standards
    • Analyze volumes and sites as applied to an actual project


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CIVL 251 Boundary Survey and Plat Design

    4 credits
    In this course students will learn about the systems of public lands, legal descriptions, and how to locate the boundary lines of property using surveying equipment. Also includes site and subdivision planning, including topography.

    Prerequisites: CIVL 105  or instructor permission

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe and apply teamwork skills to locate boundary lines of a property using surveying equipment
    • Describe system of public lands including city, county, state and federal and describe common civil engineering considerations for each
    • Apply boundary surveys  and legal descriptions to complete civil drawings
    • Properly draw boundary lines of properties including distances and directions
    • Create plat designs in subdivisions


  
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    CIVL 261 Roadway Design and Layout

    4 credits
    Fundamentals of roadway design. Students will learn the basics of design specifications, horizontal and vertical alignment and layout, rights-of-way, and plan detail.

    Prerequisites: CIVL 232  or instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply proper design standards from local and federal government to plan roadways
    • Apply design standards to calculate the length and superelevation of a curve
    • Draw horizontal alignment and layout projects
    • Apply design standards to calculate elevation of a vertical curve
    • Draw vertical alignment and layout projects
    • Properly apply design standards in roadway design projects


  
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    CIVL 271 Cartography

    4 credits
    Design and construction of maps including manual and computer mapping techniques, including major elements, concepts, and methods of cartography.

    Prerequisites: CADE 131  or instructor permission

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Correctly use and explain cartography terminology
    • Demonstrate the use of major elements, concepts, and methods of cartography


  
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    CIVL 281 Landscape Design Graphics I

    4 credits
    Basic landscape design and layout techniques emphasizing manual and/or CAD skills. Design of private and public use areas.

    Prerequisites: CADE 132  and CIVL 101  or instructor permission

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Correctly use basic landscape design terminology
    • Demonstrate proficiency in basic site/plot layout


  
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    CIVL 282 Landscape Design Graphics II

    4 credits
    Advanced landscape design and layout techniques emphasizing manual and/or CAD skills. Design of private and public use areas.

    Prerequisites: CIVL 281 

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Correctly use advanced landscape design terminology
    • Demonstrate proficiency in advanced site/plot landscaping design



Oral Communication

  
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    CMST 150 Intercultural Communication

    5 credits
    Students will gain exposure to various worldviews and improve their abilities to interact within cross-cultural settings through the development of appropriate communication strategies. This course combines theory and practice in communication in global communities.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 099  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe major concepts and issues of communication across cultures, both in domestic and international settings
    • Discuss the role values, behaviors, and beliefs play in the development of individual and group identities
    • Examine one’s own culture and communication styles and how they influence thinking and behavior
    • Develop effective communication skills for personal and professional situations
    • Access relevant information about cultures of interest and integrate into communication practice
    • Demonstrate cultural awareness and the ability to communicate effectively with sensitivity in intercultural settings


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    CMST 302 Mass Communication

    5 credits
    This course focuses on mass media’s history and cultural, social, and economic impacts. Examines how Internet, television, radio, film, and print media affect public and private life. CMST 302 studies legal, ethical, and commercial dimensions of mass communication, including First Amendment issues.

    Prerequisites: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Speak to the historic need for humankind to express information to a mass audience from pre-historic times through 21st century New Media
    • Identify historical progress of media from Gutenberg Press in the 15th century through the Internet and the 21st century
    • Specify historical markers in the development of major media: Moveable type, lithography, photography, cinema, radio, television, packet-swapping pre-internet, internet and wireless media
    • Identify ethical perceptions and implications of major media
    • Compare and contrast media impact on individual versus society (USA and globally)
    • Navigate 1st Amendment issues, plagiarism and theft issues with emphasis on 21st century media applications
    • Contrast 20th century mass communication models of “one-to-many” to emerging 21st century trends of “one-to-one” marketing, communication strategy, and user-generated content


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communication

    5 credits
    Learn greater self-awareness, more effective communication, and improve one-to-one relationships.

    Prerequisites: ABED 045  or ABED 046  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify how personal and cultural values shape interpersonal communication
    • Characterize cultural patterns in terms of interpersonal concepts
    • Recognize and describe personal communication styles based on cultural perspectives and attitudes
    • Use empathy to bridge differences in personal and cultural values and build relationships with others
    • Listen actively and critically
    • Use analytical skills to develop connections between interpersonal communication and other academic areas and/or individual outcomes
    • Demonstrate appropriate supportive techniques in interpersonal communication
    • Adapt and apply appropriate communication strategies in dealing with diverse populations and groups
    • Integrate interpersonal learning into everyday life
    • Identify and explain the model, components, conditions and common terminology on interpersonal communication
    • Recognize and describe how self-concept, perception, language, and emotions affect communication
    • Build confidence in communicating verbally, nonverbally, and in writing, one-on-one, in small groups, and before the class
    • Identify their own self-disclosure and nonverbal behaviors, listening habits, and conflict styles and applying appropriate techniques to improve any that inhibit effective communication
    • Develop and apply textbook and supplemental reading assignments and library and/or technological research to individual, dyadic, or group projects


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    CMST& 220 Introduction to Public Speaking

    5 credits
    This course sets forth the essentials of effective public speaking including: selecting your topic, library research methods, analysis, oral style, use of visual aids, preparation and delivery of various types of speeches.

    Prerequisites: ABED 045  or ABED 046  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of communication - speaking/listening as a social process
    • Use communication skills in activities in the classroom
    • Apply concepts learned to outside the classroom
    • Improve their ability to evaluate and criticize speeches


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    CMST& 230 Small Group Communication

    5 credits
    Through theory and practice, students will learn how to become more effective, competent small group participants and communicators.

    Prerequisites: ABED 045  or ABED 046  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    •       Describe the theory and principles of effective and competent small group
    •       Demonstrate collaborative skills (specifically, the adoption of appropriate group roles, decision-making, and problem-solving) in small groups
    •       Utilize conflict resolution skills building toward group consensus
    •       Explain the ethical principles of small group participation, including status and power
    •       Produce group presentations, reports, and proposals and describe the steps necessary for such production
    •       Improve the analysis and evaluation of group projects and presentations, including your own


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

College Success

  
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    HMDS 101 Information Literacy Strategies

    2 credits
    Learn to find, evaluate, and use information through problem-solving and the research process. Learn to use information effectively and efficiently in daily life. Students will be working online. Students must have an LWIT student e-mail and must be familiar with common computer commands in Windows.

    Prerequisites: ABED 045  or ABED 046  or equivalent placement score or instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define technical/information literacy
    • Use information problem-solving processes
    • Use the LWTC Learning Commons website to find resources and information on a given topic
    • Use a variety of online subscription /aggregated databases available through the LWTC Learning Commons
    • Locate information in both print and electronic reference resources
    • Use a web browser to view, print, and save pages from the Web
    • Find specific information on the Web using search tools, strategies, and new technologies
    • Effectively evaluate information found on the Web and in print
    • Properly cite information sources
    • Review legal issues such as censorship, copyright, plagiarism, and fair use
    • Identify, locate, and responsibly use relevant print and non-print resources


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    HMDS 111 College Strategies

    2 credits
    New and returning students will learn the skills necessary to succeed as a student in their technical and academic courses. Topics explored include college resources, online learning platform, time management, reading and note-taking, stress management, career choices and diversity.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Successfully navigate college resources and support services
    • Successfully use the current online learning platform to complete course assignments
    • Identify credible research databases
    • Explain the different learning styles and respective strategies to enhance learning
    • Develop measurable, long, mid and short-term goals
    • Create weekly schedule to organize and manage time
    • Explain and effectively use strategies for reading textbooks and taking notes
    • Describe stress, how it affects learning and give examples of coping strategies
    • Explain his or her values, skills and interests as they relate to career choice(s)
    • Describe the role that diversity plays in the classroom and workplace
    • Explain the five global outcomes and their significance to career training at LWIT


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    HMDS 114 Tutor Training I

    1 credits
    This course is designed to develop students’ skills and abilities as effective tutors through experiential learning and meeting the guidelines for Level I Tutor Certification as prescribed by the College Reading and Learning Association. This course will train students in collaborative learning, learning strategies, communication skills, and tutoring diverse populations.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the philosophy of tutoring and the role of the tutor in facilitating student learning
    • Articulate the roles and responsibilities of a tutor
    • Complete requisite program paperwork with accuracy
    • Identify campus/internet resources and student support services available to the tutee
    • Describe and model the tutoring cycle
    • Implement the needs assessment process to gather information on  students’ learning style(s)
    • Compare and contrast characteristics of different learning styles, identify approaches to working with various learning styles
    • Examine the influence of several factors on learning
    • Model various study skills techniques specific to time management, test preparation, test anxiety, and motivation
    • Identify and model attentive listening and effective questioning skills
    • Identify, research, and share effective study skills resources
    • Identify the benefits of diversity in student populations and advocate for a pluralistic and inclusive learning community


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10
  
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    HMDS 115 Mastering Math

    1 credits
    Increase confidence and skills in the successful study of mathematics. Students will assess their anxiety, gather information about and evaluate their current coping styles, develop and apply study skills and alternative coping strategies.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain difference between learning mathematics from other college subjects 
    • Explain strengths and weaknesses in study habits for math by developing personal math learning profile
    • Explain causes of math and test anxiety
    • Explain six types of test errors specific to math
    • Apply various steps for better test-taking specific to math
    • Explain how to create a successful study environment for math
    • Develop a study schedule for math
    • Explain the memory process and apply various memory techniques
    • Create an abbreviation system particular to math note-taking
    • Explain the Seven-step note-taking method specific to math


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10
  
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    HMDS 121 Leadership in Student Government I

    2 credits
    Term one in a three term sequence designed to develop students’ professional leadership abilities through participation in student government, including Associated Student Government meetings and programs and other college committees; examines students’ Leadership styles.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission or holding student leadership position on campus.

    Total Hours: 33 Lecture Hours: 11 Lab or Clinical Hours: 22
  
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    HMDS 122 Leadership in Student Government II

    2 credits
    Term two in a three term sequence designed to develop students’ professional leadership abilities through participation in student government, including Associated Student Government meetings and programs and other college committees; examines communication, time management and teamwork.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Total Hours: 33 Lecture Hours: 11 Lab or Clinical Hours: 22
  
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    HMDS 123 Leadership in Student Government III

    2 credits
    Term three in a three term sequence designed to develop students’ professional leadership abilities through participation in student government, including Associated Student Government meetings and programs and other college committees; examines decision-making and meeting facilitation skills.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission or holding student leadership position on campus.

    Total Hours: 33 Lecture Hours: 11 Lab or Clinical Hours: 22
  
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    HMDS 124 Tutor Training II

    1 credits
    Course two in a three course sequence designed to enhance students’ skills and abilities as effective tutors through experiential learning and meeting the guidelines for Level II Tutor certification prescribed by the College Reading and Learning Association.

    Prerequisites: HMDS 114  or instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Articulate the roles and responsibilities of a TRiO project tutor
    • Research, identify and share outside academic skills resources
    • Define cognitive, affective, and psychomotor styles of learning
    • Implement and interpret the needs assessment process to gather information on  students’ learning style(s)
    • Conceptualize a study skills plan for tutees and model effective study skills techniques
    • Analyze ways in which students learn uniquely and how we can accommodate these differences in the development of learning/tutoring experiences
    • Identify and apply tutoring strategies and active learning techniques based on individual styles of learning
    • Assess and evaluate students’ learning of specific content through ‘Classroom Assessment Techniques’
    • Model effective conflict resolution skills
    • Identify resources available to students in need of referrals
    • Model different approaches when working in various tutoring situations, present research on available resources, and discuss individualized learning plans 


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10
  
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    HMDS 134 Tutor Training III

    1 credits
    Third course in a three course sequence designed to develop students’ skills and abilities as effective tutors through experiential learning and meeting the guidelines for Level III Tutor certification as prescribed by the College Reading and Learning Association.

    Prerequisites: HMDS 124 .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Critique the roles and responsibilities of a tutor
    • Refer to campus/internet resources and student support services available to tutees
    • Describe characteristics of different learning styles and collaborate on approaches to working with various learning strategies
    • Summarize basic tenets of student development theories
    • Apply student development theories to needs assessments and working with tutees
    • Describe conflict resolution methods
    • Collaborate on best tutoring practices utilizing student learning and development theories


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10

Computer Science

  
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    CS& 141 Computer Science I Java

    5 credits


    This course teaches computer science and software engineering concepts using Java programming language. The topics include algorithm development, implementation and debugging, basic control structures (sequence, if/else, loops), procedural programming (methods, parameters, return values), file processing, arrays, and introduction to Object Oriented Programming (OOP).

    Prerequisites: CSD 111  

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use correct Java syntax when writing programs
    • Name Java data types and use them in Java projects
    • Write code that implements initialization, assignment, input, and output operations
    • Demonstrate proficiency in using basic language control structures like loops and conditional statements
    • Demonstrate understanding of modularization concepts, implement methods, and pass data through parameters and return values
    • Demonstrate knowledge of array data structure utilizing basic array-manipulation algorithms
    • Use files for data input, output and demonstrate understanding of exceptions concept in Java
    • Explain basic OOP concepts like class and object
    • Gather information, analyze problems, and develop solutions to demonstrate mastery of Java programming fundamentals
    • Evaluate solutions to identify problems and debug code
    • Design and implement programming projects as a member of a team


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CSD 100 College Success in Information Technology

    2 credits


    This course provides students with the resources needed to make an informed decision about future education and career goals and to make those goals a reality. It provides an orientation to the educational options and professional opportunities in the study of computer science. Students will develop academic and personal skills, as well as attitudes that promote success in college study.

    Required first-quarter course for all new Associate in Computer Science DTA/MRP students.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Develop goals for college study and identify strategies (including financial, time, stress, and health management) to achieve them
    • Distinguish among different fields related to computer science
    • Prepare an academic plan leading to an associate degree and successful transfer in computer science
    • Outline the specific job opportunities and educational requirements in at least one field of computing
    • Demonstrate attitudes and learning strategies that promote success in computer science
    • Successfully navigate campus resources and services including the college website, learning management system, student financial services, and various student support services
    • Define, explore, and discuss the importance of ethics and diversity in today’s classroom and community


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20


Computer Security and Network Technology

  
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    CSNT 115 A+ Software Essentials

    6 credits
    Students will install, configure, secure, and troubleshoot operating systems. The course will also include working with client operating systems in various network scenarios. Students work towards the CompTIA A+ industry certification.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher)

    Corequisites: CSNT 116  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the basic components of a computer
    • Use and describe file and directory structures
    • Troubleshoot the boot process used in personal computers
    • Demonstrate an understanding of operating system memory management
    • Demonstrate basic Windows operating system usage, commands, and configuration
    • Identify computer numbering systems and perform computations
    • Create and use Command Line and Windows GUI configuration files
    • Define computer terms used in class


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    CSNT 116 A+ Hardware

    6 credits
    Using the CompTIA A+ competencies, students will study all PC components. While installing and troubleshooting PC hardware, students gain a top-to-bottom knowledge of PC hardware technologies as they acquire critical levels of proficiency.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher)

    Corequisites: CSNT 115  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and describe the characteristics of the common storage devices used on desktop PCs
    • Describe the basic maintenance issues of disk drives
    • Explain the differences between ROM and RAM memory components
    • Demonstrate how system BIOS utilities function with system CMOS chips
    • Install and configure input and output devices and define their technologies
    • Define the characteristics and features of impact, ink-jet, laser, and color thermal printing systems
    • Explain the evolution of motherboard architectures and features
    • Research and report the latest technical advances in PC hardware via Internet resources


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    CSNT 117 Exploring Command Line Interfaces

    3 credits
    Command Line Interfaces for Microsoft and Linux operating systems are introduced. Students will become proficient with basic commands, syntax structures, and file systems, and will become familiar with using batch files to perform automated tasks.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098 /MATH 099  or higher)

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use simple commands to navigate within command line environments
    • Utilize the Linux file system, editing utilities and networking functions
    • Use various operating system utilities in a command line environment
    • Create and configure batch files to create custom configuration options
    • Transfer files to and from a variety of platforms and operating systems
    • Use Telnet and FTP utilities over the network
    • Connect and authenticate to different operating systems over the network
    • Diagnose and troubleshoot user access to directories and files over the network


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSNT 123 Current Operating Systems

    6 credits
    A technical overview of the graphical and command line user environment of current operating systems, including system installations and user/ network configuration issues.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 115  and ENGL 093  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 099  or higher), or instructor permission

    Corequisites: CSNT 124  and CSNT 125  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of OS installation hardware requirements
    • Demonstrate a strong understanding of OS boot process
    • Compare and contrast the differences between current OS file system formats
    • Recognize and demonstrate the differences between Stand-alone and Multi-boot installations
    • Differentiate and edit various registry structures
    • Configure the system requirements for network connectivity and Internet access
    • Troubleshoot and fix network connectivity issues
    • Demonstrate knowledge of current operating system architectures
    • Differentiate between feature changes and improvements of current systems
    • Complete a research paper on emerging technologies


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    CSNT 124 Open Source Operating Systems

    6 credits


    Students will install, configure, and become knowledgeable with various versions of Open Source operating systems. Students learn the systems from the client perspective to operate in a networked environment.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 115 CSNT 116 , and ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Corequisites: CSNT 120 and CSNT 125  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Install various versions of the open source operating systems
    • Implement and configure file management utilities
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the command line interface
    • Monitor and optimize system performance and reliability
    • Configure and troubleshoot the desktop environment
    • Implement, manage, and troubleshoot network protocols and services
    • Implement, monitor, and troubleshoot security
    • Describe and compare operating system architectures
    • Troubleshoot the operating system boot process
    • Create and manage user and group accounts
    • Demonstrate collaborative, organizational, and leadership abilities

     

    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80

  
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    CSNT 125 Shells and Scripts

    3 credits
    A beginning course in shell scripting and programming for maintenance and technical support personnel, using command line and graphical tools common to current operating systems and networks.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 115 , CSNT 116 , and ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Corequisites: CSNT 120 and CSNT 124  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of programming basics and principles
    • Create and use data structures and algorithms
    • Program basic web functions and applications
    • Recognize and support current programming languages and applications
    • Write and test basic PowerShell scripts and Linux shell scripts
    • Demonstrate command line management of operating systems in a network environment


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CSNT 170 A+ Certification Test Preparation

    5 credits
    Designed to prepare the student for the industry CompTIA A+ certification exams. Includes instruction and details for both the Core Technologies and the OS Technologies exams.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 115  and CSNT 116  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon the successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate CompTIA Hardware Core Competencies
    • Demonstrate CompTIA Operating System Technologies
    • Develop On-Line Electronic test taking skills
    • Install and configure PC hardware peripheral components
    • Install and configure operating systems required for exam
    • Develop setup and configuration skills for network connectivity 


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CSNT 171 Network+ Certification Preparation

    3 credits
    CSNT 171 prepares students familiar with computer network technology for the CompTIA Network+ Industry certification exam.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 234  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of subject material associated with the CompTIA exam objectives for Network Media and Topologies
    • Demonstrate an understanding of subject material associated with the CompTIA exam objectives for Network Technologies
    • Demonstrate an understanding of subject material associated with the CompTIA exam objectives for Network Devices
    • Demonstrate an understanding of subject material associated with the CompTIA exam objectives for Network Management
    • Demonstrate an understanding of subject material associated with the CompTIA exam objectives for Network Tools
    • Demonstrate an understanding of subject material associated with the CompTIA exam objectives for Network Security
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the certification exam process by completing a practice Network+ certification exam in a simulated test-center environment


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSNT 177 Security + Certification Preparation

    3 credits
    Prepares students for taking the CompTIA Security+ certification exam. The six domains of this exam’s objectives match directly to the current skill standards for IT security professionals.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 241  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be prepared to take a certification exam that covers the skills related to:

    • Network Security
    • Compliance and Operational Security
    • Threats and Vulnerabilities
    • Application, Data and Host Security
    • Access Control and Identity Management
    • Cryptography


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSNT 231 Network Fundamentals I

    6 credits
    This course includes networking fundamentals between computing systems. Students will work on designing, implementing, and maintaining a network with all its various components. There is a heavy emphasis on training based on the CompTIA Network+ industry certification requirements.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 120, CSNT 124 , CSNT 125  and MATH 098  (or placement into any MATH/MATH& course with MATH 098 as a prerequisite)

    Corequisites: CSNT 232  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Subnet classful networks
    • Explain commonly implemented network models and determine the best model for a given business scenario
    • Describe the importance of various national and international standard setting organizations
    • Define the layers and functions of the OSI model
    • Incorporate proven troubleshooting methods and tools to solve network problems
    • Distinguish between various transmission media and uses
    • Terminate cabling according to industry standards
    • Schematically design networks


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    CSNT 232 Network Fundamentals II

    6 credits
    This course is a continuation of CSNT 231 Network Fundamentals I and introduces advanced networking, configuration, and troubleshooting skills. Students will setup and manage all the basic components and services of today’s most popular networks. There is a heavy emphasis on training based on the CompTIA Network+ industry certification requirements.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 120, CSNT 124  ,CSNT 125 , and MATH 098  (or placement into any MATH/MATH& course with MATH 098 as a prerequisite)

    Corequisites: CSNT 231  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create and manage a client /server based network
    • Demonstrate usage of the Internet Protocol Suite (TCP/IP) including troubleshooting and advanced subnetting techniques
    • Use and configure different networking components
    • Recognize and use various network protocols and standards
    • Complete the basic programming of a routing device
    • Use a selection of common hardware and software utilities
    • Perform basic network security, maintenance, backup, and restoration tasks
    • Setup and configure wireless access points
    • Use SQL to create and query a basic database 


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    CSNT 234 Introduction to Virtualization

    3 credits
    Students apply the skills and competencies they have acquired in CSNT 231 and CSNT 232 to complete a virtual networking project.  This will encompass configuring host machines, virtual servers, and switches to work within a local private cloud.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 125  and MATH 098  (or equivalent placement score for any MATH course with MATH 098 as a prerequisite) or instructor approval

    Corequisites: CSNT 231  and CSNT 232  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • Create, configure, and manage virtual resources
    • Plan and determine necessary components for a virtualized system


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CSNT 241 Network Security and Encryption

    6 credits
    In this course students will examine packet structures, routing and access control lists, authentication and encryption, network traffic monitoring, and intrusion detection techniques. Additional subjects will include security and acceptable use policies, and gathering data to support forensic reviews.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 255 and CSNT 256

    Corequisites: CSNT 247  and CSNT 253  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Compare and contrast network security vs. computer security
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the network security terminologies
    • Define access control methods and their proper applications
    • Describe vulnerabilities and attacks, and measures used to protect against them
    • Explain the basic concepts of cryptography and public key infrastructure
    • Define authentication methods and their proper applications
    • Define and apply network infrastructure security, including wireless networking
    • Apply methods to harden hardware, applications, and networks
    • Correctly deploy network monitoring, analysis, and sniffing tools
    • Define auditing and intrusion detection and protection systems
    • Define common methods to enhance communications security and internet services security
    • Define and understand the concepts of operational security and security planning, including business continuity, physical security, and incident response
    • Comply with End User Licensing Agreements (EULA)
    • Create acceptable use and security policies


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CSNT 244 Virtualization I

    6 credits
    In this course students will learn the latest industry standards and practices for deploying virtual hosts and creating, configuring, and managing virtual servers, clients, and storage resources.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 255 and CSNT 256

    Corequisites: CSNT 257

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create, store, and configure images for virtual machines
    • Clone and migrate images within a virtual clustered environment
    • Work with virtual resources in contemporary platforms
    • Define the advantages that virtualization provides for scaling, redundancy and capital equipment cost savings
    • Install and configure rack mounted data center equipment
    • Configure virtual LANs (VLANs) and virtual private networks (VPN)
    • Integrate local virtual resources with cloud-based resources


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CSNT 246 Emerging Technologies

    3 credits
    In this course students will research and explore emerging technologies which will enhance and change the way products and services are created and delivered. This class is designed to enable students to assess what technologies are on the horizon and how to be prepared for a career in this rapidly changing environment.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 251  and CSNT 253  or instructor permission

    Corequisites: CSNT 241  and CSNT 244  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and assess the ramifications of future technologies
    • Determine methodologies for integrating into current systems


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSNT 247 Offensive Computer Security

    3 credits
    In this course, students will apply offensive security tactics, techniques, and procedures in order to assess the security posture of networks and information systems. Topics include intelligence gathering, technical execution, and implications of found vulnerabilities to business practices.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 255 and CSNT 256

    Corequisites: CSNT 241  and CSNT 253  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply the Penetration Testing Execution Standard to a penetration test
    • Perform a network vulnerability assessment
    • Exploit known information system vulnerabilities


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSNT 251 Network Administration

    12 credits


    This course involves networking from an administrative side. Students will develop advanced troubleshooting skills along with setting up and configuring all the main components of today’s most popular network operating system. Emphasis is on the hands-on experience.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 231 , CSNT 232 , and ENGL 099  (or placement into ENGL& 101 )

    Corequisites: CSNT 253  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use a variety of methods to perform installations
    • Setup and manage DHCP and DHCP Relay Agent
    • Manage file and directory structure security
    • Demonstrate the setup and configuration of user accounts and profiles
    • Demonstrate the proper usage of various network (IP) troubleshooting utilities
    • Demonstrate advanced IP and Firewall configuration abilities
    • Setup and configure a basic ADS structure
    • Setup and administer basic DNS, Web, and FTP services
    • Work  in an active directory domain environment
    • Setup, configure, and troubleshoot IPv4 and IPv6 based networks
    • Use routing tables to troubleshoot connectivity issues
    • Setup Distributed File System (DFS) services
    • Use delegation of control to assign special administrative abilities
    • Use command line to create Active Directory structures
    • Configure and troubleshoot group policies
    • Diagnose and troubleshoot advanced network configuration issues
    • Setup and configure Web and FTP services


    Total Hours: 200 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 160

  
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    CSNT 253 Capstone

    3 credits
    Students apply the skills and competencies they have acquired in the program to a final networking project. The project will encompass configuring all of the major components of a fully working production network including, but not limited to, cabling, routing, Active Directory, users, Web & FTP, email, and DHCP & DNS.

    Prerequisites:  CSNT 255 and CSNT 256

    Corequisites: CSNT 241  and CSNT 247  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Work in a group environment to setup and configure all the major components of a production NOS
    • Design an IP scheme to work in a multiple network environment
    • Create an effective step-by-step configuration lab with the appropriate graphic documentation


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CSNT 259 Linux+ Certification Preparation

    3 credits
    Prepares advanced students for taking the current CompTIA Linux+ certification exam.  The outcomes match directly to the four domains of CompTIA’s LPIC-1 exam objectives.

    Prerequisites: CSNT 117  and CSNT 124  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will demonstrate the ability to:

    • Determine and configure hardware settings. Boot the system. Change runlevels/boot targets and shutdown or reboot system. (101)
    • Design hard disk layout. Install a boot manager. Manage shared libraries. (102)
    • Work on the command line. Process text streams using filters. Perform basic file management. Use streams, pipes and redirects. Create, monitor and kill processes. Modify process execution priorities. Search text files using regular expressions. Perform basic file editing operations using vi. (103)
    • Create partitions and filesystems. Maintain the integrity of filesystems. Control mounting and unmounting of filesystems. Manage disk quotas. Manage file permissions and ownership. Create and change hard and symbolic links. Find system files and place files in the correct location. (104)
    • Use online learning and research methods to remain current with industry certification objectives.


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSNT 294 Resumes and Interviews

    3 credits
    A basic foundation for developing and writing resumes and cover letters along with Job Interview techniques. Emphasis is on jobs in the IT fields, although the techniques and ideas introduced will apply to any type of job.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Write a proper cover letter
    • Write a properly formatted resume
    • Define the different types of resumes
    • Demonstrate assorted job hunting techniques
    • Prepare for a job interview
    • Describe and demonstrate job interview skills
    • Participate by demonstrating teamwork, appropriate work ethics, professionalism, and respect for diversity


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

Computing and Software Development

  
  •  

    CS 143 Computer Science II Java

    5 credits


    This class teaches Object Oriented Programming (OOP) concepts and introduces elementary data structures as well as algorithms associated with them. The topics include classes, interfaces, inheritance, OOP design, exceptions, data structures (arrays, lists, queues, stacks, and trees), and algorithm performance analysis.

    Note: CS 143 was originially listed in error in the 2017-2018 catalog as CSD 143.

    Prerequisites: CS& 141  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Design and implement Object Oriented principles in Java
    • Use inheritance concept and interface mechanism in class design and implementation
    • Write code that utilizes exceptions and the exception handling mechanism available in Java
    • Demonstrate mastery in using array, linked list, stack, and queue data structures
    • Demonstrate knowledge of tree data structures and algorithms associated with them
    • Design and implement recursive algorithms
    • Use recursion to manipulate linked lists and tree data structures
    • Implement searching and sorting algorithms for arrays
    • Estimate algorithm complexity using Big O notation
    • Design and implement a medium-sized Java program using OOP principles


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CSD 105 Programming Concepts For Non-Programmers

    5 credits
    This course is a general introduction to concepts of computer programming and their use in building interactive applications. Students study computer architecture, basic principles of data processing, programming logic and design, using visual programming tools.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 090  or higher) and ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain binary and hexadecimal numeric systems and their relation to the decimal system
    • Explain the concepts of client-server architecture
    • Describe the history and evolution of Internet
    • Justify the need for database systems in data processing
    • Describe the concept of tables in a relational database
    • Describe software development life cycle
    • Define algorithm and use algorithmic thinking when solving a problem
    • Demonstrate the use of iterations and branching in computer programming
    • Use variables to manipulate data
    • Use logical operators to write conditional statements
    • Explain the need for functions in programming
    • Use events and event handling in interactive applications
    • Build interactive applications using visual programming tools


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSD 111 Computer Programming Fundamentals

    5 credits
    A general introduction to concepts related to designing and writing computer programs and procedures. Students study problem-solving techniques, algorithmic thinking, programming logic, and concepts such as data types, data structures, and object-oriented programming.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher) and MATH 090  (or placement into MATH 099  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the phases of software development
    • Recognize the proper format of assignment statements
    • Explain conditional statements, relational operators, logical operators, and loops
    • Identify the scope of variables within a given program and the various data types
    • Declare and initialize arrays, manipulate array data
    • Describe the concepts of modularization
    • Explain the difference between syntax errors and logical errors
    • Define Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) terms
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the need for documentation
    • Identify an information need and formulate a research plan to address it
    • Research, organize, and evaluate information from a variety of sources


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSD 112 HTML and CSS

    5 credits
    This course is an introduction to HyperText Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS).  Students examine the key components of HTML to create functional web pages and apply CSS style sheets to improve page layout and overall appearance. Class teaches elements of responsive web design and techniques of its implementation.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099 MATH 087  or higher) and (or placement into MATH 090  or higher) and CSD 111  (or concurrent enrollment in that course; formerly ITAD 111) or completion of one of the following: BTE 120 , DSGN 100  (formerly MMDP 101/DSGN 101), or CSNT 115  

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Write syntactically correct HTML code using the latest version of HTML language
    • Create basic HTML web pages which are displayed correctly in modern web browsers
    • Use links and images to design aesthetically pleasing and functional web pages
    • Create forms to gather user input
    • Incorporate tables into the web pages to display data
    • Write style sheets using latest version of the CSS language
    • Use correctly text, font, background, border, list, float, margin, padding, display and other CSS property groups
    • Use CSS rules together with HTML layout elements to change the layout of a page
    • Explain the key principles of responsive web design and techniques of their implementation
    • Validate and debug HTML and CSS code
    • Design and develop websites compliant with web standards
    • Design and develop websites that reflect cultural awareness


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSD 122 JavaScript and jQuery

    5 credits


    Students learn to apply programming skills to build dynamic, interactive web pages and web applications. Students use JavaScript and jQuery to manipulate the Browser Object Model, validate forms, use object-oriented techniques, and enhance website usability and user experience by adding dynamic features to the HTML pages.

    When enrolling into this class, students are expected to know HTML and CSS syntax, basic programming control structures (loops and if-else statements), and be familiar with array manipulation and function-writing techniques in programming language of their choice.

    Prerequisites: CSD 111  and CSD 112  

    Students who completed ITAD 111 and ITAD 112 meet the prerequisites.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use JavaScript data types and operators to write syntactically and functionally correct code
    • Demonstrate knowledge of both JavaScript and jQuery syntax
    • Write code that manipulates Browser Object Model and CSS properties of the objects
    • Use JavaScript control structures for program flow control
    • Read, analyze, design, and implement function definitions and function calls
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the browser event model
    • Handle events with jQuery and JavaScript
    • Manipulate data in strings and arrays
    • Validate form data
    • Create animations and visual effects with jQuery
    • Add expandable menus, slideshows, and modal dialogs to websites using jQuery
    • Use jQuery UI widgets
    • Use jQuery plug-ins
    • Debug and handle errors in JavaScript code
    • Use JavaScript and jQuery to implement dynamic, user-friendly web pages


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CSD 138 Structured Query Language (SQL)

    5 credits


    Students will learn how to use Structured Query Language (SQL) to retrieve information from a relational database, filter, modify, group and summarize data, and retrieve joint information from multiple tables in a database.

    Prerequisites: CSD 111  

    Students who completed ITAD 111 meet the prerequisite.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate understanding of the purpose, design, and terminology of a relational database
    • Explain and use relational schema
    • Use a relational database management system to enter, edit, and run SQL statements
    • Access multiple tables and work with unions, subqueries, self joins, inner joins, and outer joins
    • Use aggregation functions
    • Build SQL queries to retrieve, store, and modify data
    • Create and edit tables and enforce data integrity on them
    • Evaluate and synthesize information in a database
    • Gather and organize information needed for database creation and maintenance


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CSD 221 Systems Analysis and Design

    5 credits


    In Systems Analysis and Design, students will learn the core skills needed to plan, analyze, and design information systems using an object-oriented approach.  Requirements for information systems will be used to create functional, structural, and behavioral models leveraging the Unified Modeling Language (UML).

    Prerequisites: CSD 111  

    Students who completed ITAD 111 meet the prerequisite.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • State the characteristics and benefits of Object Oriented Design
    • Describe the phases of the Software Development Life Cycle
    • Describe different software development methodologies with a special emphasis on Agile Scrum
    • Create a Project Vision & Scope document that defines business requirements and scope for the information system
    • Create a system-level overview using Context and Feature Tree diagrams
    • Formulate a research plan using techniques to elicit and gather user requirements
    • Document requirements in a Software Requirements Specification
    • Turn requirements into functional models using Use Case descriptions, Use Case diagrams, and activity diagrams
    • Create structural models using CRC cards and Class diagrams that provide a static view of the software architecture
    • Create behavioral models using Sequence and Communication diagrams and Behavioral State machines to describe the internal behavior of a system
    • Demonstrate proficiency in class and method design
    • Apply design criteria (e.g., coupling, cohesion, etc.) to assess a software design and suggests possible areas to improve the design


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CSD 228 Programming with C#

    5 credits
    C# is a modern, powerful, and expressive object-oriented language that is widely used in general software development as well as web development. Students learn the language fundamentals and more advanced topics including inheritance, event-driven programming, and GUI implementation.

    Prerequisites: CS& 141  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate proper use of C# syntax
    • Read, understand, and write C# expressions
    • Design, code, and debug classes
    • Properly use C# types in software implementations
    • Define encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism and use these concepts when designing and implementing classes
    • Use streams and files for input and output
    • Use exception handling to recover from errors
    • Demonstrate solid understanding of OOP
    • Write event-handling routines
    • Use forms to gather user input
    • Design and implement programming projects as a member of a team


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    CSD 230 Programming For Mobile Devices

    5 credits


    This course teaches the principles of mobile application design and development. Students will learn application development for major mobile platform(s). Topics will include user interface design, memory management, user interface building, input methods, data handling, and network techniques.

    Prerequisites: CS 143  or CSD 228  

    Students who completed CS 143 or ITAD 228 meet with prerequisite.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Develop applications for deployment on mobile devices
    • Describe the major differences in requirements for mobile applications vs. desktop applications
    • Design user interfaces for touch oriented input model
    • Identify and use appropriate development tools to implement and debug mobile applications
    • Use Software Development Kits (SDK) for mobile applications
    • Describe security and performance requirements for mobile applications
    • Control hardware features of a device


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CSD 233 C++ Programming

    5 credits


    This class teaches C++ programming language, its specific features, and the advantages they present for software development. The topics include pointers and memory management, reference parameters, c-strings and arrays as primitive data types, class inheritance, polymorphism, encapsulation, use of virtual functions and templates, and exceptions.

    Prerequisites: CS 143  as either a prerequisite or corequisite

    Students who completed CS 143 meet the prerequisite.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use correct C++ syntax when writing programs
    • Name and use C++ data types
    • Explain the difference between pass-by-value and pass-by-reference function parameters in C++, and use pass-by-reference parameters to return values from functions
    • Explain the concept of pointers and dynamic memory management in C++, and use pointers effectively in programs
    • Explain and illustrate the advantages and challenges direct memory access presents for programmers in C++, and demonstrate the use of safe memory management techniques
    • Use arrays and c-strings in programs
    • Use class inheritance, polymorphism, and virtual functions in C++
    • Justify the need for exceptions, write exception-throwing and exception - handling code, and create exception classes 
    • Create template functions and classes in C++
    • Use C++ STL library
    • Implement data structures such as lists and trees using pointers
    • Write medium-sized programs in C++


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CSD 235 Algorithms and Data Structures

    5 credits


    Students study fundamental algorithms and data structures, learn to use lists, arrays, stacks and queues, and apply searching and sorting methods to solve intermediate level programming problems. Students will write medium sized C++ programs consisting of multiple classes and data structures.

    Prerequisites: CS 143  

    Student who completed CS 143 meet the prequisite.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the basic principles of software engineering
    • Implement various data structures like linked lists, stacks, queues, and binary trees using Object Oriented Programing (OOP) techniques
    • Implement searching and sorting routines on various data structures while paying close attention to the efficiency of the algorithms being used
    • Use STL and its particular components to implement data structures
    • Estimate efficiency of algorithms
    • Demonstrate a thorough understanding of recursion and its role in implementation of linked lists and tree data structures
    • Develop technical documentation, properly explain algorithms, organize and clarify ideas used in a solution
    • Use industry standard conventions for describing algorithm complexity analysis


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CSD 268 Quality Assurance Methodologies

    5 credits
    This Quality Assurance (QA) Methodologies course is an introduction to the theory, concepts, and reasoning behind software testing and automation. Students learn how to create and run test scripts and implement basic test projects.

    Prerequisites: CS& 141  

    Corequisites: CS 143  or CSD 228  or CSD 233  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the objectives, limits, and cycles of testing
    • Identify the differences between Black Box and White Box testing
    • Demonstrate the process of reproducing bugs
    • Define the role of automated software testing
    • Create test cases and test scripts, and document the test cases according to the technology standards
    • Demonstrate test management practices and techniques
    • Identify strategies of “Risk Management”
    • Create a project risk-management strategy
    • Manage a tracking system for bugs
    • Demonstrate performance testing and stress testing
    • Describe the use of problem reports/bug reports
    • Develop a test plan to effectively communicate testing requirements


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSD 275 PHP Scripting

    5 credits


    PHP is a widely-used general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for server-side web development. Students learn to build web applications requiring server-side logic and to access SQL databases.

    Prerequisites: CSD 111  and CSD 112  

    Students who completed ITAD 111 and ITAD 112 meet the prerequisites.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use PHP data types and operators to write syntactically and functionally correct code
    • Use control structures for program flow control
    • Read, analyze, design and implement function definitions and function calls
    • Manipulate strings and arrays
    • Work with files and directories to store and access data
    • Access form data on the server
    • Access data in SQL databases
    • Debug and handle errors in PHP code


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CSD 280 Web Development with Python

    5 credits


    In this course students learn Web applications development using Django, a popular web framework in Python. At the end of the course, students will be able to create dynamic data-driven web applications, including a ToDo List web app, email client, web page scrapping, etc.

    Prerequisites: CSD 112  and CS& 141  

    Students who completed ITAD 112 and CS& 141 meet the prerequisites.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create web applications using Django web framework in Python
    • Consume modern web technologies, such as JSON and REST APIs
    • Create applications that interact with a database using server-side technologies
    • Create form-based web UIs with input validation using Django
    • Create web APIs using Django
    • Create client applications in Python
    • Deploy, test, and debug Django web applications
    • Create useful technical supporting documentation


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CSD 298 Technical Interview/Job Seach

    5 credits


    This course teaches technical interview preparation techniques and examines the job search process for employment in the software development field. Common strategies for a successful interview will be discussed. Students will practice solving interview problems.

    Prerequisites: CS 143  

    Students who completed CS 143 meet the prerequisite.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate successful strategies for problem solving under the conditions of a job interview
    • Solve a variety of technical interview problems and answer soft skills questions
    • Research and identify resources for technical interview questions
    • Identify job opportunities in the chosen software-related area
    • Research a potential employer
    • Present themselves to a potential employer in a confident, professional manner


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CSD 299 IT Project

    3 credits
    In this course students work on developing a real world software application going through a complete application development life cycle, including analysis, design, specification, implementation, debugging, and deployment.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe software application development life cycle
    • Manage development of an application from initial conception to final release
    • Apply necessary skills to solve a real world IT problem
    • Develop and deploy a complete software package
    • Produce written documentation for an application
    • Deliver effective presentation of a software solution


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    CSD 321 System Analysis and Design

    5 credits
    In this course students learn the core skills needed to plan, analyze, and design information systems using an object-oriented approach. Requirements for information systems are used to create functional, structural, and behavioral models leveraging the Unified Modeling Language (UML).

    Prerequisites: CSD 122 , CSD 138 , CSD 268 , and admission to the BAS IT:CSD progam

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to: 

    • Explain the general structure of a software project
    • Analyze a problem domain
    • Document project requirements and use cases
    • Develop technical specifications
    • Develop project architecture and data flow diagrams
    • Apply object-oriented approach to software project design
    • Use Unified Modeling Language (UML)
    • Build UML diagrams
    • Properly design relationships
    • Conduct dependency analysis
    • Use UML tools
    • Demonstrate ability to create end-to-end analysis and design of a project


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSD 322 Computer and Network Architecture

    5 credits
    This course provides students with an architectural overview of modern computer technology. This is accomplished by presenting the set of hardware and software components that together define a computer system. In addition, since connectivity has become ubiquitous, the overview includes an introduction to network architecture.  

    Prerequisites: CSD 122 , CSD 138 , CSD 268 , and admission to the BAS IT:CSD program

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon succesful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss the major functional components of a computer (Input Unit, Output Unit, Central Processing Unit, Arithmetic Logic Unit, Temporary and persistent storage unit, Control unit).
    • Describe the CPU’s instruction set, and program in it
    • Understand CPU and system performance metrics
    • Demonstrate familiarity and facility the TCP/IP protocol
    • Describe the TCP/IP stack
    • Write programs running on separate machines that communicate with each other via a socket
    • Describe the role and function of a router
    • Explain how a packet is routed from one machine to another on the same subnet
    • Explain how a packet is routed from one machine to another on a different subnet
    • Design and implement programming projects as a member of a team


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSD 331 Database Modeling and Design

    5 credits
    This course introduces relational database schema design using real-life data examples. Advanced data management topics are examined, including data modeling, normalization, analysis of query efficiency, usage of stored procedures, and triggers. Non-relational (NoSQL) databases used with Big Data are introduced and compared with RDMS.

    Prerequisites: CSD 138 , CSD 321 , MATH 220 , and admission to the BAS IT:CSD program

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to: 

    • Query and update relational database
    • Gather requirements for designing of a real-life database
    • Properly design RDBMS schema
    • Use entity-relationship modeling tools
    • Evaluate performance issues and create database indexes
    • Create database views
    • Describe principles of pessimistic and optimistic concurrency control methodologies
    • Identify and implement database integrity constraints
    • Explain usage cases for stored procedures and triggers
    • Normalize a Database Schema
    • Explain the advantages of three normal forms
    • Explain issues related to database security and ways to secure a database
    • Explain design and implementation issues specific to distributed databases
    • Demonstrate knowledge of non-relational database models and compare them to relational model


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSD 332 Software Project Management

    5 credits
    This course teaches the fundamentals of software project management. Students learn how to manage a software development project at different stages of its life cycle, from analyzing requirements to providing support, and examine roles of stakeholders and methods of project planning, scheduling, risk analysis and mitigation, scope control, progress monitoring, and quality assurance. Modern techniques such as agile development are studied. Students learn to assess product readiness and manage ways to successfully complete a time-driven or a feature-driven project. Different aspects of project readiness are analyzed from feature completeness and acceptance testing to properly documenting, globalizing, and marketing the product.

    Prerequisites: CSD 321  and admission to the BAS IT:CSD program

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to: 

    • Describe software process models
    • Gather requirements for a software project
    • Demonstrate ability to gather project requirements
    • Prioritize project features
    • Design technical specifications
    • List key team roles required for a typical project
    • Describe responsibilities of team members
    • Develop a project schedule
    • Describe techniques for project tracking
    • Describe risk mitigation techniques
    • Explain waterfall methodology
    • Explain techniques used in agile methodology
    • Explain pros and cons of agile methodology vs. waterfall methodology
    • Enumerate and apply quality assurance techniques
    • Identify and explain issues related to maintaining a software product


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSD 335 Algorithms and Structures

    5 credits
    Students study data structures, such as stacks, queues, hash tables, heaps, trees, and graphs, and use different algorithmic approaches to problem solving, such as simple recursion, backtracking, divide and conquer, greedy and brute force algorithms, and dynamic programming. Students analyze algorithm efficiency in terms of memory use and speed, using Big O notation for run-time performance estimation.

    Prerequisites: CS 143  and admission to the BAS IT:CSD program

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to: 

    • Explain the basic principles of algorithm analysis, big O notation
    • Implement elementary data structures, such as arrays, linked lists, and strings
    • Explain and implement stack and queue data structures using different underlying data structures.
    • Explain the difference in approach and efficiency of recursive algorithms, divide and conquer algorithms, and dynamic programming
    • Implement tree data structures, including binary search trees.
    • Use different tree traversal techniques.
    • Implement, analyze, and compare efficiency of different elementary searching algorithms such as selection, insertion and shell sorts; sort linked lists
    • Describe, implement, and analyze efficiency of quicksort and merge sort algorithms
    • Explain and implement priority queue and heap data structures; analyze and implement algorithms associated with them, including heapsort
    • Explain, compare, and implement different search algorithms and search data structures like different varieties of binary search trees and hash tables
    • Explain graph properties and types, implement different graph representations
    • Describe different graph search algorithms
    • Explain implement and analyze minimum spanning trees algorithms 


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSD 412 Web Application Development

    5 credits
    Students learn to design and develop interactive and dynamic web pages based on modern web development standards. This is a team-project based course, in which students use a variety of tools, techniques, and patterns to design, develop, and deploy a web application. The course covers topics such as client/server programming, web forms and input validation, authentication/authorization, security, scalability, caching, integration with databases using object-relational mapping, testing, and deployment.

    Prerequisites: CSD 122 , CSD 331 , and admission to the BAS IT:CSD program

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the fundamentals of how the Web works
    • Develop web applications consisting of forms and input validation
    • Develop clients that can consume public REST APIs
    • Develop 3-tier web applications based on MVC design pattern
    • Implement server side data persistence using databases
    • Implement authentication and authorization for user accounts
    • Deploy, test and debug web applications.
    • Provide useful technical supporting documentation.
    • Design and implement software applications as a member of a team


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSD 415 Operating Systems Concepts

    5 credits
    This course teaches the major functional components of a modern, general purpose operating system, including the process management subsystem, the memory management subsystem, and the I/O subsystem. Process management topics include process and thread creation and termination, process scheduling, inter-process communication, and signal handling. Memory management topics include virtual memory, and paging. I/O topics will include file systems, sockets, I/O scheduling, network protocols, and device drivers. Students will gain facility and insight into these topics through hands-on activities including programming assignments, source code walk-through exercises, and selected reading from the Internet and the course text.

    Prerequisites: CSD 322  and admission to the BAS IT:CSD program

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to: 

    • Download, configure, compile, and install an operating system from source code on the Internet
    • Explain the boot process
    • Name the major subsystems of an operating system
    • Describe the major data structures used by the operating system
    • Write system level code in to interface to devices
    • Explain process scheduling
    • Demonstrate proficiency in writing multi-processed applications that share information using inter-process communication mechanisms
    • Demonstrate proficiency in writing thread-safe, multi-threaded applications
    • Discuss and describe deadlock scenarios
    • Explain virtual memory
    • Write programs that communicate using sockets
    • Write programs that store information to disk using the I/O system (memory mapped files)
    • Design and implement programming projects as a member of a team


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSD 425 Cloud Computing

    5 credits
    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of cloud computing. Students will learn to implement those concepts by developing advanced applications on one of the major cloud computing platforms, e.g., AWS, Azure, OpenStack, etc. This course covers topics such as PaaS, IaaS, SaaS, virtualization, web services, big data computing, security, and operational aspects such as deployment, monitoring, and alerting. Students work on projects in teams, store and share code via version control system, and utilize small team agile strategies.

    Prerequisites: CSD 412  and admission to the BAS IT:CSD program

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the fundamentals of cloud computing
    • Use IaaS cloud offering to provision and use Virtual Machines and Virtual Networks
    • Use PaaS and SaaS to develop scalable cloud applications that can scale up and scale out
    • Use automation to deploy, maintain, and monitor cloud resources
    • Use various cloud storage options to store application and user data
    • Use cloud security and identity management services


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSD 436 Algorithmic Problem Solving

    5 credits
    This course teaches advanced algorithm and problem-solving techniques. Students learn to identify and combine known algorithms to solve real-world problems, including those used at a technical job interview for a software development position. Common interview problems are classified, studied, and solved. Students participate in mock technical interviews and provide and discuss interview feedback.

    Prerequisites: CSD 335  and admission to the BAS IT:CSD program

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate techniques for succeeding at a technical problem solving interview
    • Demonstrate ability to refine a problem statement
    • Invent an algorithmic solution to a software problem
    • Analyze a proposed solution
    • Evaluate performance of a solution
    • Find ways to optimize a solution
    • Identify special cases that need to be tested
    • Find and correct errors in an algorithm
    • Quickly code a simple algorithm
    • Demonstrate knowledge of frequently used algorithmic techniques
    • Efficiently explain your thinking process and accept feedback
    • Demonstrate ability to explain your solution to a problem
    • Adapt a solution to changing requirements


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSD 438 Big Data Application Development

    5 credits
    Students are introduced to techniques and tools used to manage, process, and interact with massive datasets. The course takes a hands-on approach to explore non-relational NoSQL data storage for big data applications. The course covers topics such as distributed data storage, map-reduce, key value stores, stream processing, data mining, and basic statistical techniques to perform data analytics.

    Prerequisites: CSD 331 , CSD 425 , and admission to the BAS IT:CSD program

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the fundamentals of Big Data and analytics
    • Implement data pipelines to integrate data from variety of sources
    • Use Publish-Subscribe and Message Queue models to acquire data
    • Use MapReduce programming model to run batch analytics
    • Use Spark and Storm to perform real-time analysis
    • Apply basic machine learning and statistical models on big data
    • Implement reporting APIs and dashboards


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CSD 480 Capstone Project

    5 credits
    Students experience a full software product development cycle by designing, implementing, and deploying a desktop, web, or mobile application. The course is designed to prepare students for employment at a software company, applying the knowledge they accumulated during the entire course of studies, from project management and design, to algorithm development, to coding and quality assurance. The course may be completed as an internship at a software company.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission required

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe software application development life cycle
    • Explain the general structure of a software project
    • Manage development of an application from initial conception to final release
    • Analyze a problem domain
    • Document project requirements and use cases
    • Develop technical specifications
    • Develop project architecture
    • Design and develop set of tests for the project
    • Develop and deploy a complete software package
    • Demonstrate ability to create end-to-end analysis, design, and development  of a real-life project
    • Produce written documentation for a project
    • Deliver effective presentation of a software solution


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

Cooperative Work Experience

  
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    CWEX 190 Cooperative Work Experience Seminar I

    1 credits
    Seminar topics may include legal issues of the workplace, interviewing techniques, and conflict resolution. Students have the opportunity to openly discuss issues they face at their workplace in a learning environment.

    Corequisites: CWEX 197 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10
  
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    CWEX 197 Cooperative Work Experience I

    1-5 credits
    Cooperative work experience offers students the opportunity to further their skills by working at an approved job site. Training plan will be developed to enable the student to acquire on-the-job skills while earning an income.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate skills identified on the student’s individual training plan


    Total Hours: 200 Practicum or Internship Hours: 200
  
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    CWEX 290 Cooperative Work Experience Seminar II

    1 credits
    Seminar topics may include legal issues of the workplace, interviewing techniques, and conflict resolution. Students have the opportunity to openly discuss issues they face at their workplace in a learning environment.

    Corequisites: CWEX 297 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10
  
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    CWEX 297 Cooperative Work Experience II

    1-5 credits
    Cooperative work experience offers students the opportunity to further their skills by working at an approved job site. Training plan will be developed to enable the student to acquire on-the-job skills while earning an income.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate skills identified on the student’s individual training plan


    Total Hours: 200 Practicum or Internship Hours: 200

Criminal Justice

  
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    CJ& 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

    5 credits
    Overview of the criminal justice system and its basic policies, institutions, and dilemmas, examining the role of police, courts, and corrections. Students analyze sociological theories and perspectives to issues in law enforcement, adjudication, and corrections.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss the nature of justice, and list various types of justice
    • Describe the process of American criminal justice, including the stages of criminal case processing
    • Recognize the major sources of crime data, their uses and limitations
    • Explain the role of policing in a modern society
    • Explain the nature of due process and the specific constitutional amendments upon which due process guarantees are based
    • Explain the differences between the federal and state court systems
    • Describe criminal court systems and adversarial concepts
    • Describe correctional systems and list the purposes of punishment
    • List the basic differences between juvenile and adult systems


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Culinary Arts

  
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    CULA 101 Trends in the Food Industry

    3 credits


    The course focuses on issues pertaining to the flow of food through society. Subjects examined will include such topics as organic, conventional, and natural as related to food; what sustainability means as it relates to farming and fishing; what GMOs are and whether they are good or bad; food security and other related subjects.

    Students will also have the opportunity to speak with farmers, ranchers, and fishermen and others working in the food industry.

    Multiple field trips will be scheduled throughout the quarter; participation is mandatory.

    Culinary and non-culinary students may take this class.

    Prerequisites: None

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Define and use common terms used by the industry related to food matters
    • Describe the differing methods used in food production
    • Debate the merits of the different food production methods
    • Identify the laws and regulations governing production and distribution of food
    • Evaluate quality in food products


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
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    CULA 116 Culinary Skills and Concepts

    9 credits
    This course introduces students to the basics of the food service kitchen. The student learns to identify and use culinary tools and equipment, including knives, hand tools, and small appliances. They learn basic kitchen preparations and procedures, including stocks, sauces, and soups. This course requires the student to acquire a Washington State Public Health Card in the first week of class.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Corequisites: CULA 128  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Recognize and identify culinary equipment
    • Demonstrate understanding of  knives, hand tools, and other culinary equipment  
    • Execute basic knife skills employing all of the classic cuts
    • Recognize and identify commonly used fruits, vegetables, grains, starches, meat, fish, and poultry
    • Identify fresh herbs, spices, seasonings, oils, and vinegars
    • Employ standard weights and measures to demonstrate proper scaling and measurement techniques and recipe conversions
    • Demonstrate knowledge of classic sauce and soup making
    • Exhibit knowledge of basic cooking techniques including poaching, sautéing, grilling, blanching, and baking
    • Collaborate and cooperate with co-workers


    Total Hours: 150 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 120
  
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    CULA 119 Intermediate Culinary Skills & Concepts

    7 credits
    Students expand on the competencies introduced in CULA 116  to learn more advanced skills and modern cooking techniques by creating secondary sauces, pan sauces, and further their understanding of cooking methodology. Students also learn techniques on advanced protein breakdown including meat, poultry, and fish. Identification of products, advanced knife skills, and techniques on seasoning and flavoring will be highlighted.

    Prerequisites: CULA 116 , CULA 128 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate proficient skill in advanced sauce making  
    • Identify vegetables, grains, and starches and differentiate proper cooking methods for them
    • Identify and fabricate fresh seafood, meat, and poultry
    • Compose complex braised, roasted, and stewed dishes using standardized recipes
    • Execute complex dishes employing standardized recipes
    • Illustrate the use and understanding of herbs, spices, and other seasonings in modern cooking techniques
    • Demonstrate understanding of quantity cooking by executing recipes for banquet and cafeteria outlets 


    Total Hours: 110 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    CULA 120 Restaurant Fundamentals

    12 credits
    In this course students will be introduced to the front line and learn in a live environment. The course will examine the avant-garde and success of current culinary trends and styles of leading chefs, restaurateurs and gastronomes.

    Prerequisites: CULA 119  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Calculate recipes by changing yields and portion sizes
    • Demonstrate appropriate knife skills by properly boning fish, meat and poultry
    • Set up Cold Food Line and Hot Food Line
    • Maintain proper temperatures for hot and cold food items
    • Use a Point of Sale System
    • Identify, select and apply the proper cooking techniques for selected cuts of meats, poultry, fish and seafood with an emphasis on an a la carte style service


    Total Hours: 210 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 180
  
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    CULA 124 Introduction to the Front of House

    9 credits
    This course focuses on fine dining table, quick service, and buffet management service through hands-on interaction with customers in an operational restaurant. Students learn to use a Point of Sale (POS) System. Learn the ability to handle cash, multi task and run the front of the house of a restaurant including managing, hosting, waiting and bussing tables.

    Prerequisites: CULA 128  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Capably manage guest services unique to hospitality operations
    • Communicate effectively with diners
    • Demonstrate basic tableside fabrication and service skills
    • Expedite customer orders effectively
    • Facilitate effective and timely banquet and catering arrangements
    • Operate and manage a program-sponsored buffet
    • Properly set up and breakdown a restaurant/food service dining facility
    • Demonstrate the ability to work effectively as a cafeteria cashier and in other quick service venues such as the bakery window
    • Utilize a point of sale system for reservations, payment processing, check splitting, and various fine dining management features
    • List the requirements of customer service operations which provide alcohol to the public


    Total Hours: 140 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 100
  
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    CULA 127 Introduction to Baking

    9 credits
    The student will learn baking basics and theories including preparation of doughs such as tart, pie, cookies, rolled-in doughs, basic yeast leavened doughs, pastry, restaurant desserts, and basic finishing techniques.

    Prerequisites: CULA 116  and CULA 128  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate fundamental skills, concepts and techniques of baking
    • Exhibit proper use of ingredients, sanitation, equipment and product identification
    • Prepare quality yeast raised products, quick, breads, cakes and icings, pastries, pies and cookies on a consistent basis
    • Prepare creams, custards, pudding, restaurant desserts and related sauces
    • Demonstrate the importance of plating and presentation of restaurant desserts
    • Demonstrate employability and planning on a daily basis


    Total Hours: 160 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 140
  
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    CULA 127A Introduction to Baking Part I

    6 credits
    The student will learn baking principles and theories including preparation of doughs such as, tart, pie, cookies, rolled-in doughs, basic yeast leavened dough’s, pastry, restaurant desserts and basic finishing techniques.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  and ABED 046  or equivalent placement scores

    Corequisites: CULA 128  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate fundamental skills, concepts and techniques of baking
    • Exhibit proper use of ingredients, sanitation, equipment and product identification
    • Prepare quality yeast raised products, quick, breads, and cookies on a consistent basis
    • Demonstrate the importance of plating and presentation of restaurant desserts
    • Demonstrate employability and planning on a daily basis


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    CULA 127B Introduction to Baking Part II

    6 credits
    The student will learn baking principles and theories including preparation of various cakes, pies, muffins, icing, beginning cake decoration, beginning chocolate, restaurant desserts and basic finishing techniques.

    Prerequisites: CULA 127A  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate fundamental skills, concepts and techniques of baking
    • Exhibit proper use of ingredients, sanitation, equipment and product identification
    • Prepare quality cakes, pies, and muffins on a consistent basis
    • Prepare creams, custards, pudding, restaurant desserts and related sauces
    • Demonstrate the importance of plating and presentation of restaurant desserts
    • Demonstrate employability and planning on a daily basis


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    CULA 128 Food Service Safety and Sanitation

    3 credits
    This course covers the principles of food borne illness, sanitation, safety, personal hygiene, health regulations, and inspections as they pertain to a commercial kitchen. Certification or re-certification by the National Restaurant Association is given upon successful completion of the ServSafe examination.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Obtain a Servsafe certificate from the National Restaurant Association Education Foundation (NRAEF)
    • Obtain Washington state Food Handler’s Card
    • Describe and apply the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) management system to identify food safety hazards and critical control points
    • Characterize microorganisms related to food borne illnesses and food spoilage
    • Describe food borne illness symptoms and prevention methods
    • Practice personal hygiene and healthy habits
    • Recognize signs of food spoilage
    • Properly use cleaners and sanitizers in a commercial kitchen
    • Write basic cleaning schedules and cleaning procedures for a commercial kitchen
    • Properly dispose of food waste and garbage from a commercial kitchen
    • Describe how to control and exterminate insects and rodents
    • Recognize safe and unsafe practices in the receiving, storing, and handling of raw and prepared foods
    • Recognize procedures and precautions to prevent workplace accidents 
    • Describe the proper use of a fire extinguisher
    • Review Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) to obtain pertinent safety information regarding industrial chemicals
    • Recognize unsafe and unsanitary equipment and facility conditions
    • Safely prepare potentially hazardous food according to safe time/temperature principles
    • Conduct safety and sanitation inspections of commercial kitchens according to local health department regulations


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    CULA 130 Supervision and Management

    3 credits
    The course focuses in managing people from the hospitality supervisor’s viewpoint. The emphasis is on technique from increasing productivity, controlling labor costs, time management, and managing change. It also stresses effective communication and explains the responsibilities of a supervisor in the food service operation. Student will develop personal career objectives, self-promotion skills and strategies for conducting an effective job interview in the food service industry. Emphasis will be placed on skills to effectively manage people, provide leadership, communication, and decision making.

    Prerequisites: CULA 116 CULA 124 , and CULA 128  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Expedite food on the restaurant line
    • Procure and receive food and beverages
    • Stock and label food
    • Complete safety and sanitation logs
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the duties and functions of the Chef/Supervisor
    • Recognize the different types of harassment and discrimination
    • Develop managerial objectives
    • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of progressive discipline principles
    • Demonstrate the principles, elements, barriers and importance of communication in the workplace      
    • Define and use common terms used by supervision and management


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    CULA 137 Nutrition in Food Service

    3 credits


    This course covers the basic principles of nutrition and its relationship to good health and healthful dining practices, with emphasis on health-conscious and heart-healthy menu and recipe development. The functions of nutrients and food safety are also included.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the fundamental principles of nutrition
    • List and describe the functions of the basic nutrients required for good nutrition
    • Differentiate between complex and simple carbohydrates
    • Draft and prepare a nutritionally balanced menu within currently established dietary guidelines
    • Select appropriate ingredients and preparation techniques that support dietary guidelines
    • Research and apply applicable federal, state, and local food safety guidelines for health conscious eating 
    • Describe current trends in dining practices, such as low fat, low calorie, gluten-free, vegetarian, and vitamin supplements 


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CULA 142 Costing and Menu Planning

    3 credits
    Students learn how to calculate food costs on various menus used in the food service industry. Students learn how to control restaurant and foodservice costs and the importance of budgeting and forecasting in the restaurant industry. They will have the opportunity to build and cost out a menu.

    Prerequisites: CULA 116 , CULA 128 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Calculate food costs on various menus used in the food service industry
    • Construct menus for use in hospitals, cafeterias, restaurants, hotels, and other food establishments using guidelines taught in class
    • Recognize and order products as per food specification outlined by purveyors
    • Order food and prepare a menu within specified budget guidelines


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    CULA 143 Wine & Food Pairing

    3 credits
    Wine and food pairing, wine marketing and sales. Building a restaurant wine list, pricing and profit making strategies. Wine tasting, elements of character and key components of wine. This course will include wine tasting and assessment.

    Prerequisites: Must be at least 21 years old.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Pair wines with all types of food, appetizers, entrées, and desserts
    • Define the various types of wine: table, sparkling, and fortified wines and prescribe appropriate uses for each
    • Recommend an appropriate list of wine for various types of restaurants or tasting events
    • Explain when and why wine is decanted and demonstrate how it is done
    • Read and understand wine labels of the world
    • Define bottle and glassware used in the industry and identify stemware appropriate to the situation
    • Identify the five primary sensations of the mouth and how they affect the taste of wine
    • Employ traditional and contemporary wine and food pairing techniques and utilize both/either when appropriate
    • Continually refine tasting and pairing techniques and apply these skills towards future wine-related professional and educational endeavors


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
 

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