Catalog 2017-2018 
    
    Mar 03, 2021  
Catalog 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Culinary Arts

  
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    CULA 144 International and Classical Cuisine

    4 credits


    This course is an in-depth study of Classical and International cuisines. Through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on cooking, students will learn the products, ingredients, and techniques that are indigenous to the regions of each cuisine.

    Plate presentation, mis en place, organization, and cooking techniques are emphasized. The recipes used in this curriculum are close replications to the original dishes. 

    Prerequisites: CULA 119  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Recognize and demonstrate awareness to the different products, ingredients, restrictions, and techniques associated with various cultures and countries
    • Properly prepare foods using the fundamental cooking methods of various cultures
    • Properly prepare and cook foods using classical methods
    • Apply food presentation techniques to create aesthetically pleasing dishes
    • Properly apply basic butchering techniques in the fabrication of meat products


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    CULA 146 Garde Manger

    4 credits


    Students will apply techniques of pickling, brining, curing and smoking and the preparation of forcemeats and mousses. Modern ways of designing, arranging and decorating food platters for practical and show purposes are emphasized and practiced.

    Students are introduced to the basic function and structure of the cold kitchen, pantry, reception foods, a la carte appetizers, and grand buffet arrangements. Students learn how to prepare sandwiches, salads, dressings, cold sauces, canapés, hot and cold hors d’oeuvres, appetizers.

    Prerequisites: CULA 119  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create cold sauces, dressings, dips and butter components
    • Perform basic principles of food presentation and platter layout/styling
    • Define and use common terms associated with Garde Manger
    • Assemble cold appetizers, hors d’oeuvres, and hot and cold reception food
    • List and identify ingredients, herbs, and spices associated with the cold food


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    CULA 151 Competition Training

    2 credits
    The course focuses on training students for culinary competitions. Students will have the opportunity to train for practical cooking or baking competitions and for knowledge based competitions.

    Prerequisites: CULA 116  or CULA 127 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course, in the competition setting, the student will be able to:

    • Identify, select and apply the proper cooking techniques for selected cuts of meats, poultry, fish and seafood
    • Identify, select and apply the proper cooking techniques for selected desserts, cakes, candies and chocolates
    • Demonstrate skills necessary for organizing tools, equipment and product for use in a competition arena
    • Demonstrate proper food handling and sanitation methods
    • Apply food presentation techniques to create aesthetically pleasing dishes
    • Demonstrate knowledge of ingredients, sanitation, classic cooking methods, nutrition and equipment


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CULA 154 Food and Beverage Procurement

    3 credits
    This course introduces students to basic principles of purchasing food, beverage, equipment and paper goods, contract services and supplies. Primary focus is on product identification, supplier selection, ordering, receiving, proper storage and issuing process and inventory management.

    Prerequisites: CULA 116 , CULA 128 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Facilitate quarterly culinary fiscal inventory of food  and  beverage inventory 
    • Demonstrate ethical purchasing procedures
    • Demonstrate ability to adhere to quality product standards set by instructor
    • Evaluate quality in food products
    • Identify how to select purveyors 
    • Describe inventory cost control techniques


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    CULA 195 Capstone, Portfolio

    5 credits
    Students construct a professional portfolio of all culinary experience obtained to date which will include current resume, cover letters, current job postings, 5 year plan and copies of all certificates and awards achieved during their time in the program. Students will design and prepare either a 4 course meal for 12 guests or baking presentation utilizing skills learned throughout the program.

    Prerequisites: CULA 120 , CULA 127 CULA 128 , CULA 128 , CULA 144 , and CULA 146  or BAKE 122  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Design and prepare a cost effective and marketable menu
    • Cost out each recipe for the menu and prepare a note book for the luncheon or bakery display
    • Execute menu to plan using skills gained throughout time spent in the program
    • Collaborate with fellow students and instructors on implementation of said menu
    • Prepare a resume and demonstrate effective interviewing skills
    • Prepare a five year plan and vision statement
    • Assemble a portfolio of all work including certificates and awards


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CULA 196 Internship/Externship/Cooperative

    5 credits
    Students work under a professional chef or manager in a related field at an approved food service establishment or on campus. The externship will apply and provide practical experiences and professional exposure to acquired subject matters, career and professional skills in a real and practical environment.

    Prerequisites: CULA 120  or BAKE 122 , and instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Manage, schedule and prioritize food service events
    • Prep, cook and plate to guest/patron satisfaction
    • Identify mission and philosophy of the institution
    • Demonstrate knowledge  of  the various venues and facets of the food service industry  


  
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    CULA 241 Wines of the World

    3 credits
    This courses offers a survey of wine, wine-making techniques, and grape varietals across the globe. Students will explore the history of wine by region, including a focus on viticulture practices and wine-making styles. Regional influences of climate, various soil types, and the concept of terroir are also explored. This course will include wine tasting and assessment.

    Prerequisites: Must be at least 21 years old.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 11 Lecture Hours: 11

Dental Assistant

  
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    DENT 111 Introduction to Dental Assisting

    2 credits
    Students learn terminology, Washington State Dental Practice Act policies, ethics and jurisprudence, dental specialties and an introduction to the clinical aspects of being a dental auxiliary. Professional organizational structures will be included.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Assistant program.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    At the completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of basic tooth morphology
    • Describe the role and identify the educational and licensing requirements of the members of the dental health team
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the function of professional organizations in dentistry
    • Demonstrate knowledge about the Dental Practice Act of Washington State and its applications to dental assisting
    • Demonstrate knowledge of basic medical and dental terminology
    • Identify outstanding contributors to the dental assisting profession
    • Identify the eight dental specialties recognized by the ADA
    • Explain the basic steps in the communication process
    • Understand non-verbal communication and practice identifying non-verbal clues
    • Describe barriers to communication and explain how to overcome them
    • Develop improved listening skills
    • Recognize which groups and individuals fit under the diversity umbrella
    • Identify steps by which many cross-cultural barriers may be overcome
    • Describe how to combat racial and sexual harassment in the workplace
    • Discuss the importance of grooming and hygiene as it relates to working in the dental office


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    DENT 112 Introduction to Chairside Procedure

    5 credits


    Course covers maintenance of dental equipment and operatory instrumentation. Students will learn home care patient instructions, assess oral hygiene, procedural prophylaxis fluoride and pit and fissure sealant application.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Assistant Program.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define preset tray and tray system and define the parts of a dental  instrument
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of dental headpieces
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of maintaining equipment and operatory
    • Demonstrate correct instrument transfer
    • Demonstrate their understanding of instrument grasps
    • Demonstrate the correct use of fulcrums in dental procedures
    • Utilize the mouth mirror to full advantage
    • Use an explorer effectively and safely
    • Review, update, or complete a patient health history
    • Position dental chairs and mobile, or non-mobile equipment
    • Maintain the operating field
    • Seat a patient and prepare for a procedure
    • Demonstrate the skill and knowledge of how to assist with the administration of local anesthetic
    • Demonstrate the Bass, Modified Bass, Charter’s Modified scrub, Modified Stillman, Rolling stroke ,and electric tooth brushing techniques
    • Demonstrate the knowledge of the prophylaxis procedure by:
    • Demonstrate the skill and knowledge of the coronal polish procedure
    • Demonstrate the skill and knowledge of the fluoride application procedure
    • Demonstrate the skill and knowledge of the sealant application procedure
    • Demonstrate knowledge of health care literary, patient diversity, equity and inclusion
    • Demonstrate effective communication skills by active participation in small group activities and presenting an oral presentation regarding patient homecare


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60

  
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    DENT 113 Dental Practice Theory

    5 credits
    Basic concepts and principles of dental practice are presented in this lecture course. The emphasis is on Infection Control procedures, dental emergencies, accident prevention, assessment procedures, and record keeping. Skills and procedures are practiced by the student with team members, in a laboratory environment.

    Prerequisites: Admission into the Dental Assistant program.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss concepts and principles related to selected aspects of Preparation, Assessment and Practice Management
    • Recall knowledge about hazardous materials and use of Safety Data Sheets (SDS)
    • Describe common accidents/injuries that occur in the dental environment, methods for preventing them, and ways of promoting safety for clients and dental personnel in the dental environment
    • Recall knowledge of infectious diseases, disease transmission, and body’s defense mechanisms against infection (from Microbiology)
    • Describe methods for controlling infection in dental practice
    • Explain how to establish and maintain clinical asepsis and how to problem-solve breaks in the asepsis chain
    • Compare and contrast effectiveness of various sterilization and disinfection methods
    • Discuss the physical and legal ramifications of inadequate infection control
    • Discuss any specific infection control guidelines for clinical and lab procedures introduced this quarter
    • Discuss appropriate aseptic techniques for obtaining supplies and assembling armamentarium
    • Describe ways of organizing armamentarium for efficient and safe dental assisting practice
    • Discuss action to take, in all areas of the Dental Assisting Program, in the event of emergencies (fire, earthquake, etc)
    • Discuss the protocol, in all areas of the Dental Assisting Program, for obtaining trained emergency care personnel
    • Explain the location of the emergency kit, oxygen equipment, and emergency telephone numbers
    • Discuss the rationale for the Program requirement of current First Aid and CPR training
    • Discuss adaptations for CPR for clients in a dental chair
    • Explain the rationale for obtaining a comprehensive health history
    • Discuss types of health history forms (e.g. consent cards, health questionnaire, dental history questionnaire)
    • Describe medico-legal requirements for completing a health history form
    • Compare and contrast questionnaire and interview methods for obtaining health history information
    • List key questions that must be included in a health history questionnaire and the reasons for each
    • Explain the purpose of assessing a client’s general appearance and of assessing the head and neck
    • Define inspection, palpation, auscultation, and percussion
    • Describe a systematic method and procedures for assessing general appearance and the head and neck
    • Explain how to record head and neck assessment findings, client’s complaints/comments, and the chart entry
    • Recall knowledge of the structures of the oral cavity
    • Explain the purpose of assessing the intra-oral soft tissues
    • Describe a systematic method and procedures for assessing the intra-oral soft tissues
    • Explain how to record intra-oral soft tissue findings, client’s complaints/comments, and the chart entry
    • Recall knowledge of dentitions, tooth identification systems, and dental morphology
    • Explain the purpose of assessing the dentition
    • Describe a systematic sequence for assessing the dentition
    • Describe physical injuries, regressive changes of teeth, and tooth malpositions
    • Explain how to record the following dental assessment findings: missing teeth, physical injuries, regressive changes of teeth, tooth malpositions, client’s complaints/ comments, and the chart entry
    • Explain the purpose of recording Angle’s classification of occlusion
    • Describe a systematic method for determining the classification of occlusion
    • Explain how to record Angle’s classification of occlusion, client’s complaints/comments, and the chart entry
    • List vital signs and the rationale for obtaining them for dental assisting care
    • Describe temperature, pulse, respiration, and blood pressure, including normal ranges and factors which may cause variances
    • Describe procedures for obtaining vital signs
    • Describe how to record temperature, pulse, respiration and blood pressure, and the chart entry
    • Recall knowledge of informed consent and confidentiality
    • Describe dental charts and records used in the Dental Clinic including the rationale for each component of the chart
    • Describe guidelines for making progress notes for all procedures
    • Discuss confidentiality as it relates to clinical dental records
    • Describe medico-legal aspects of charts and records including handling and storage


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    DENT 114 Ethics & Law, Office Management

    2 credits
    Students are introduced to professional ethics and legalities and the responsibilities of the dental assistant to the community, dental profession, dental team and patient. Management of front office procedures are presented.

    Prerequisites: Completion of an application for admission and admission to the Dental Assisting program.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define key terms related to ethics and law
    • Explain the importance of ethics and law to dentistry
    • Differentiate between the various types of law that affect the practice of dentistry
    • Explain the various types of consent
    • Explain the effects of the Good Samaritan Law on the health care professions
    • Describe the code of ethics of professional dental organizations
    • Explain the importance of the state’s dental practice act
    • Identify the function of a state board of dentistry
    • Define key terms related to office management
    • Explain the function of the business office
    • Explain the various procedures commonly performed by the business office
    • Examine issues related to conflict resolution
    • Discuss the importance of ethical behavior as it relates to establishing constructive relationships in the workplace
    • Identify job situations which pose ethical dilemmas
    • Develop and use a systematic method for making ethical decisions


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    DENT 115 Oral Science

    3 credits


    Students are introduced to basic dental sciences including Oral Anatomy, Tooth Morphology & Oral Microbiology. The course focuses on the healthy, normal end of the health/disease continuum & provides a foundation for further dental science study.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Assistant program.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define key terms related to oral anatomy, tooth morphology, and microbiology
    • Identify the anatomic landmarks of the oral cavity
    • Identify the salivary glands and ducts
    • Identify the types of oral mucosa
    • Identify the four types of teeth, describe the design and specialized functions of each type, and classify them as anterior or posterior teeth
    • Describe the Universal numbering system, the Federation Dentaire International two-digit tooth-recording system, and the Palmer system
    • Define the terms related to tooth morphology including:  the Curve of Spee, the names of the surfaces of the teeth, contours and contacts, overbite and overjet, embrasure and occlusal form and the physiology of occlusion
    • Identify the number and types of teeth in the primary dentition; state the specialized functions of the primary dentition
    • Compare the primary and permanent dentition in terms of:  numbers and types of teeth; size and shape of similar types of teeth
    • Identify each of the permanent and primary teeth in terms of:  number of cusps and roots, and unusual anatomic landmarks
    • Given an extracted tooth, or a typodont tooth, identify the following:  the type of tooth; whether it is an anterior or posterior tooth; and if it has an incisal edge or an occlusal surface
    • Identify the following terms:  aerobes, anaerobes, asepsis, epidemiology, microorganisms, pathogen and sepsis
    • Describe the main shapes of bacteria and differentiate between aerobes and anaerobes
    • Describe how some bacteria protect themselves against adverse conditions by forming capsules and spores and state the problems caused by this microbial defense system
    • State potential means of disease transmission in the dental office and list the microorganisms which are of particular concern
    • Describe the universal precautions used for every patient to prevent disease transmission
    • Describe the microbial etiology of oral disease


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
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    DENT 117 Dental Materials I

    3 credits
    This theory and laboratory course introduces the student to selected dental materials and to basic restorative dentistry procedures and techniques, and is designed to give students a working knowledge of skills required for restorative dentistry.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Assistant program.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss classes of dental materials used in dentistry
    • Understand the purpose and usefulness of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and the importance of safe material handling
    • Discuss physical and mechanical properties and characteristics of dental materials
    • Discuss the properties, characteristics and uses of dental materials introduced this quarter, and principles for manipulation
    • Manipulate the dental materials introduced this quarter following the manufacturers’ directions and safety precautions
    • Understand the principles of selected restorative dentistry skills and procedures including self-evaluation criteria


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    DENT 121 Dental Assisting Practicum I

    6 credits
    Course covers assessing oral hygiene, stains, dental deposits; procedural prophylaxis, fluoride, and pit and fissure sealant application; and instrumentation of auxiliary expanded duties. Clinical implementation and practical application of procedures permitted by the Washington State Dental Practice Act in the campus dental clinic under the supervision of dentists and dental faculty.

    Prerequisites: DENT 112 , DENT 114 , DENT 117  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate to the dentists and faculty the dental assisting skills, attitudes and techniques required for the smooth operation of the College’s dental clinic
    • Demonstrate time management skills


    Total Hours: 120 Lab or Clinical Hours: 120
  
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    DENT 124 Study of the Human Body

    4 credits
    Students continue their study of the basic sciences including human anatomy/ physiology, head and neck anatomy, and histology/embryology. Histology/ embryology forms the basis for the future study of general, oral and periodontal pathologies.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe basic biochemistry and life
    • Describe the basic components of the cell and tissues of the body
    • Describe anatomical and physiological features of the head and neck region.
    • Describe the functions of the Skeletal System
    • Describe the functions of the Circulatory System
    • Describe the functions of the Nervous System
    • Describe basic dental histology and embryology
    • Describe tooth development
    • Describe the functions of the Endocrine System
    • Describe the functions of the Lymphatic System
    • Describe the functions of the Digestive System
    • Describe the functions of the Respiratory System
    • Describe the functions of the Urinary System
    • Describe the functions of the Reproductive System


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    DENT 126 Radiology

    3 credits
    This course introduces radiology as a diagnostic aid, and includes the concepts and principles of x-radiation, x-ray generation and radiation protection.

    Prerequisites: DENT 112 , DENT 113 , DENT 114 , DENT 117 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    At the completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss the basic principles of radiation biology and the uses of x-radiation in dentistry
    • Discuss the concepts of x-radiation generation and radiation protection
    • Discuss radiographic imaging and imaging techniques for periapical and bitewing radiographs
    • Discuss principles of processing, and processing and mounting techniques
    • Discuss characteristics and landmarks of periapical and bitewing radiographs


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    DENT 127 Dental Materials II

    3 credits
    This theory and laboratory course continues from DENT 117 . Students are introduced to principles of restorative dentistry. Additional dental assisting skills are introduced.

    Prerequisites: DENT 115 , DENT 117  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss principles of cavity design and cavity preparation
    • Discuss hand and rotary instruments and equipment used for restorative dentistry
    • Understand the principles of selected restorative dentistry skills and techniques, including self-evaluation criteria
    • Understand procedures and techniques for trimming study models, including safety precautions (L1) and lab maintenance requirements (L1)
    • Understand uses of rubber dam, armamentarium, and principles for application and removal (L1)
    • Understand matrix/wedge application and removal, including rationale, armamentarium and techniques
    • Understand the requirements for tray set-ups for amalgam, composite and temporary restorations
    • Understand principles and techniques for recontouring, finishing, and polishing restorations (L1)


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    DENT 131 Dental Assisting Practicum II

    7 credits
    Clinical implementation and practical application of procedures permitted by the Washington State Dental Practice Act, in the campus dental clinic under the supervision of dentists and dental faculty.

    Prerequisites: DENT 112 , DENT 114  ,DENT 117 , DENT 121 , DENT 127 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon the successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate to the dentists and faculty the dental assisting skills, attitudes, and techniques required for the smooth operation of the College’s dental clinic
    • Demonstrate time management skills


    Total Hours: 140 Lab or Clinical Hours: 140
  
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    DENT 133 Restorative Dentistry Dental Assisting

    3 credits
    Students will continue chairside procedures with the emphasis on theory and skills related to the expanded functions such as impression taking and amalgam polishing. Students will gain a fuller understanding of fixed and removable prosthodontics and the role that they play in assisting the dentist in the fabrication of dental prosthesis. The laboratory portion of this course will introduce related exercises as well as other advanced assisting skills necessary for employment in Washington State.

    Prerequisites: DENT 115 , DENT 117 , DENT 127 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of fixed prosthodontics
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of removable prosthetics
    • Demonstrate an ability to safely place and remove retraction cord
    • Demonstrate an ability to fabricate, cement, and ultimately remove a temporary crown


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    DENT 136 Radiography

    2 credits
    This course builds on the science foundation established in DENT 126 . Students begin to take radiographs on clinical patients and study advanced techniques of radiography such as extra-oral techniques.

    Prerequisites: DENT 115 , DENT 124 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe cone placement in terms of vertical and horizontal angulation
    • Differentiate between bisecting and paralleling techniques
    • Explain the need for panoramic radiographic films
    • Describe the purpose for occlusal films
    • Describe the purpose and number of periapical films using the bisecting technique
    • Describe the use of intraoral photography and videography in a clinical setting


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    DENT 137 Dental Specialties

    4 credits
    This course emphasizes the special needs of patients. Dental specialty practices and armamentarium are discussed. This course will also introduce the student to common pathology of the oral cavity which they may encounter.

    Prerequisites: DENT 111 , DENT 112 , DENT 115 , DENT 124 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of common procedures and instrumentation for pediatric dentistry
    • Demonstrate an understanding of common procedures and instrumentation for endodontics
    • Demonstrate an understanding of common procedures and instrumentation for oral surgery
    • Demonstrate an understanding of common procedures and instrumentation for periodontics
    • Demonstrate an understanding of common procedures and instrumentation for orthodontics
    • Demonstrate an understanding of common oral pathologic conditions which may be encountered in the dental office


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    DENT 211 Dental Assisting Practicum III

    4 credits
    Clinical implementation and practical application of procedures permitted by the Washington State Dental Practice Act, in the campus dental clinic under the supervision of dentists and dental faculty.

    Prerequisites: DENT 112 , DENT 114 , DENT 117 , DENT 127 , DENT 131 , DENT 133  DENT 136 , DENT 137  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate to the dentists and faculty the dental assisting skills, attitudes, and techniques required for the smooth operation of the College’s dental clinic
    • Demonstrate Time Management Skills


    Total Hours: 80 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    DENT 214 Pharmacology & Nutrition

    3 credits
    This course presents general concepts of dental pharmacology. General nutrition is also discussed. The six essential nutrients are reviewed.

    Prerequisites: DENT 131 , DENT 133  DENT 136 , DENT 137  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss concepts and principles of nutrition
    • Discuss nutrition promotion and counseling
    • Define pharmacology
    • Explain the functions of the Controlled Substances Act
    • Describe drug abuse
    • Recognize frequently used Latin abbreviations
    • List and describe the different routes for drug administration
    • Define drug terminology
    • Define antibiotics and list adverse reactions for each
    • Describe other therapeutic agents


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    DENT 215 Workplace Preparation

    2 credits
    This is a course designed to give the students the skills needed to get their first dental assisting position. This includes cover letter and resume preparation, thank you letter, job hunting, and interviewing techniques. We will also focus on preparing for the CDA exam held by DANB.

    Prerequisites: DENT 112 , DENT 114 , DENT 117 , DENT 127  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the skills necessary to successfully obtain their first dental job
    • Perform basic tasks involving the internet
    • Demonstrate principles of leadership, self-esteem, and goal setting


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    DENT 294 Dental Assisting Internship

    6 credits
    This course is clinical practice designed to perfect students’ competence in dental assisting functions, performed under direct supervision of a dentist in private practice, specialty offices and dental clinics.

    Prerequisites: DENT 131 , DENT 133 , DENT 136 , DENT 137 .

    Corequisites: DENT 211 , DENT 214 , DENT 215 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the rules & regulations as they relate to:
      • Attendance
      • Attitude
      • Professionalism
      • Appearance
      • Ethical and legal issues
    • Exhibit the expectation of a dental assistant as related to:
      • Attendance
      • Attitude
      • Professionalism
      • Appearance
      • Ethical and legal issues
    • Describe, identify, and exhibit communication skills appropriate in the clinical setting (i. e., interaction with dentist, staff, patients, coworkers)
    • Keep records during the clinical assignments to include procedures and assignments completed
    • Observe clinical procedures
    • Assist the operator with clinical procedures
    • Give oral hygiene & post-operative instructions to patients
    • Perform expanded functions under supervision
    • Expose, process, and mount radiographs
    • Review and record a complete health history
    • Prepare tray set-ups
    • Sterilize and/or disinfect operatories and dental instruments and trays
    • Assist the receptionist in front office duties
    • Assist the chairside assistant in general dental assisting duties
    • Four-handed dentistry
    • Six-handed dentistry



Dental Hygiene

  
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    DHYG 240 Local Anesthesia For Licensed Dental Hygienists

    2 credits
    This course is designed to fulfill the requirements of Local Anesthesia Instruction set forth by the Washington Revised Code 18.29 for Dental Hygienists. In this course, the student is instructed in the techniques and usage of local anesthesia administration and nitrous oxide sedation. Additionally, the pharmacology of the drugs administered, their interactions with other medications, emergency procedures, and the review of anatomy and physiology of the head and neck will be covered.

    Prerequisites: Graduate from an accredited Dental Hygiene School, successful completion of the National Board for Dental Hygienists.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe anatomical and physiological features of the head and neck region
      • Describe the skull
      • Describe the blood supply of the head and neck
      • Describe the muscles of the head and neck
      • Describe the nerves of the head and neck
      • Describe the lymphatic drainage of the head and neck
      • Describe pain and pain perception
    • Describe intra-oral anatomy and physiology
      • Describe intra-oral soft tissue structures and landmarks and their functions
      • Describe oral mucosa
      • Describe salivary glands
      • Describe the nasal cavity
    • Identify (on a skull, anatomical model, dentoforms, patient, or diagram) anatomical features and landmarks of the head and neck
    • Discuss general concepts and principles of pharmacology
      • Discuss basic concepts of pharmacology
      • Describe the characteristics of drug action
      • Discuss adverse reactions to drugs
      • Discuss drug abuse and its implications in administering local anesthesia and nitrous oxide
      • Describe prescriptions
    • Discuss the pharmacology of drugs used in dentistry
      • Describe the characteristics of drugs affecting the autonomic nervous system
      • Describe the characteristics of non-narcotic analgesics
      • Describe opioid analgesics
      • Describe anti-anxiety agents and sedatives
      • Describe general anesthetics
    • Describe pharmacological medications that may affect restorative dental care
      • Describe anti-anxiety drugs
      • Describe cardiovascular drugs
      • Describe anticonvulsant drugs
      • Describe psychotherapeutic drugs
      • Describe antihistamines
      • Describe adrenocortico steroids
      • Describe drugs used for common hormone therapies
      • Describe anti-neoplastic agents
      • Describe respiratory and gastro-intestinal drugs
    • Understand the pharmacology of local and topical anesthetics and their procedures and techniques
      • Discuss the pharmacology of local anesthetics
      • Discuss the pharmacology of vasoconstrictors
      • Discuss topical anesthetics
      • Understand local anesthesia and armamentarium and its preparation
      • Understand evaluating the patient/client prior to using local anesthetic
      • Understand general principles for local anesthetic injections
      • Understand complications and emergencies that can occur
      • Understand local anesthetic injections used in dental hygiene care
      • Describe and demonstrate proficiency in local anesthetic technique for the following injections:
        • Posterior superior alveolar
        • Middle superior alveolar
        • Anterior superior alveolar
        • Nasal palatine
        • Greater palatine
        • Inferior alveolar
        • Lingual
        • Long buccal
        • Infiltration
        • Infra orbital
    • Discuss the pharmacology of nitrous oxide and nitrous oxide sedation procedures and techniques
      • Discuss the pharmacology of nitrous oxide
      • Understand nitrous oxide armamentarium and its preparation, including safety features
      • Understand evaluating the patient/client prior to using nitrous oxide
      • Understand the complications and emergencies that can occur with nitrous oxide sedation
      • Understand and demonstrate to proficiency the techniques for induction and filtration, monitoring patients, and conclusion of nitrous oxide use


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 241 Restorative Expanded Duties

    4 credits
    This course is designed to fulfill the requirements of instruction in Restorative Dentistry for the Dental Hygienist set forth by the Washington Revised Code 18.29. In this course, the students will learn/review dental anatomy, occlusion, dental materials for restorative dentistry, isolation techniques, and sealant application. Additionally, the student will be instructed in amalgam placing, carving and finishing, and composite placing and finishing.

    Prerequisites: Graduate from an accredited Dental Hygiene School, successful completion of the National Board for Dental Hygienists.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe crown and root morphology, and features of occlusion
      • Discuss the arrangement of the teeth
      • Describe features of the teeth
      • Describe contact areas of the teeth
      • Discuss specific crown and root characteristics of permanent teeth
      • Describe deciduous teeth
      • Discuss features of tooth morphology that may affect the dental hygiene care
      • Define occlusal classifications
      • Describe occlusal classifications
      • Describe tooth relationships during static and functional occlusion
    • Discuss classes of dental materials in dentistry
      • List classes of dental materials, their general uses in dentistry, and examples of common materials in each class
      • Discuss the purpose of studying dental bio-materials
      • Briefly discuss the history of materials used in dentistry
      • Discuss demands the oral environment places on dental materials
      • Discuss characteristics of an ideal dental material
    • Understand the purpose and usefulness of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for all products in this course
      • Discuss quality assurance programs that control the use of dental materials in the USA
      • Discuss the history of MSDS and the rationale for their development
      • Understand the categories of information available on MSDS
      • Understand the uses of MSDS in the dental hygiene program and in private practice
    • Discuss general properties and characteristics of dental materials
      • Discuss physical properties and characteristics of dental materials
      • Discuss mechanical properties and characteristics of dental materials
      • Discuss biological characteristics of dental materials and the bio-compatibility of common materials used in dentistry
    • Discuss the properties, characteristics, and uses of dental materials used in this course and principles of manipulation
      • Discuss cavity-cleansing agents
      • Discuss varnish
      • Discuss liners, bases, and cements
      • Discuss amalgam, including issues and controversies associated with its use
      • Discuss etchants and bonding agents
      • Discuss composite resins and sealants
    • Manipulate the dental materials used in this course according to manufacturers’ directions and safety precautions
      • Manipulate the following materials:
        • cavity cleansing agents
        • varnish
        • liners
        • bases
        • cements
        • amalgam
        • acid etch
        • bonding agents
        • composite resins
        • sealants
      • Understand the principles of selected restorative dentistry skills and techniques, including self-evaluation criteria for all classes of amalgam, composite, and temporary restorations and sealants
      • Discuss and demonstrate patient/operator/assistant positioning for restorative dentistry and zones of activity
      • Discuss and demonstrate four-handed dentistry and principles of instrument transfer
      • Discuss operating field maintenance requirements for restorative dentistry and principles of retraction and high volume evacuation
      • Discuss the prevention of potential emergencies related to the skills and procedures introduced this semester
    • Perform selected restorative dentistry procedures
      • Position team members and a mannequin (eventually a patient), for restorative dentistry
      • Transfer instruments using acceptable technique and following safety precautions
      • Maintain operating field using high volume evacuation and retraction
      • Discuss and demonstrate sealant application on a mannequin (eventually a patient)
    • Discuss principles of cavity design and cavity preparation
      • Discuss cavity classifications
      • Discuss cavity nomenclature
      • Discuss principles for the preparation of each cavity classification
    • Discuss hand and rotary instruments, and equipment used in restorative dentistry
      • Describe types of restorative hand instruments and their uses
      • Describe the identification of specific hand instruments used for amalgam, composite and temporary restorations
      • Describe rotary instruments used with high and low speed hand-pieces during restorative dentistry
      • Discuss the sterilization and maintenance of hand and rotary instruments and hand-pieces
      • Discuss the use and maintenance of equipment used in restorative procedures
    • Perform the requested restorative dentistry procedures to proficiency level 3 by course end
      • Assist for restorative procedures including:
        • preparing operatory and equipment
        • assembling armamentarium
        • positioning mannequin/patient
        • assisting with rubber dam
        • maintaining operator field
        • assisting during amalgam, composite, and temporary restorative procedures
        • manipulating required materials
        • maintaining operatory and equipment following infection control requirements
      • Perform and demonstrate competence in restorative dentistry procedures including:
        • providing a comfortable, safe environment
        • administering local anesthesia and nitrous oxide
        • placing and removing the rubber dam
        • assembling, placing and removing matrices and wedges
        • recognizing the need for cavity medicament
        • placing liners, bases, varnish and other selected medicaments
        • placing, condensing, carving and polishing Class I, II, and V amalgam restorations
        • placing and finishing Class I, II, III, IV and V composite restorations, including the use of acid-etch and bonding agents
        • placing and finishing temporary restorations
        • complete chart entries
        • recontouring, finishing and polishing previously placed restorations
        • placing and finishing sealants
      • Answer, verbally, questions relating to the theory and foundation for all restorative dentistry procedures and techniques, including dental materials, MSDS, and safety precautions


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    DHYG 242 Healthcare Foundations

    3 credits
    This course introduces students to the foundational theory, laws, and regulations required of all Washington healthcare employees. It includes prevention and management of medical emergencies and infection control for the dental hygiene professional. Students explore the personal, professional, and community issues related to HIV disease.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Hygiene program

    Corequisites: DHYG 243 , DHYG 246 , DHYG 247 , and DHYG 256  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate CPR/first aid for the healthcare provider
    • Complete the dental hygiene program orientation
    • Identify and comply with all aspects of OSHA, WISHA, and DOSH regulations for patient and operator safety
    • Identify and discuss issues related to HIV disease
    • Identify established protocol for operation and maintenance of equipment
    • Complete a medical history review to identify risks for medical emergencies
    • Demonstrate accurate vital sign measurements
    • Apply the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classifications to determine medical risks in dental treatment
    • Describe protocol for managing potential emergency situations
    • Identify and administer appropriate drugs to handle emergency situations
    • Identify and respond to specific medical emergencies that may arise in the dental office
    • Identify and demonstrate establlished protocol for accident and injury prevention in the dental clinic


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 243 Introduction to the Profession of Dental Hygiene

    2 credits
    This course introduces the student to the profession of dental hygiene.  Current concepts of dental hygiene practice are examined with emphasis on the problem-solving process and the responsibilities of the dental hygienist to the profession.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Hygiene program

    Corequisites: DHYG 242 , DHYG 246 , DHYG 247 , and DHYG 256  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the practice of dental hygiene as a profession
    • Demonstrate responsibility and accountability of professional obligations
    • Identify the basic principles and concepts of teaching and learning as they relate to dental hygiene practice
    • Explain the principles of self-directed learning as they relate to continuing dental hygiene education and practice
    • Identify the basic components of the problem-solving process (i.e., assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation)
    • Describe how the problem-solving process is used as a model for the practice of dental hygiene
    • Apply basic interpersonal skills in interactions with dental patients, colleagues, and staff
    • Explain the purpose and components of the American Dental Hygiene Association (ADHA) Code of Ethics
    • Explain the professional role and responsibilities of the dental hygienist related to the community, dental profession, dental team, and client
    • Demonstrate professional attitudes and behaviors as they relate to the practice of dental hygiene


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 246 Periodontology I

    2 credits
    In this course students are introduced to the basic dental science of Periodontics and the structures of the oral cavity. The course focuses on the healthy, normal end of the health/disease continuum and the origin of periodontal pathologies. The course provides a foundation for further dental science study as well as for clinical dental practice.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Hygiene program

    Corequisites: DHYG 242 , DHYG 243 , DHYG 247 , and DHYG 256  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the basic characteristics of the gingiva
    • Describe the components and function of the peridonal ligament
    • Describe the components and function of alveolar bone
    • Describe the charactistics of plaque and the plaque biofilm
    • List and describe the characteristics and function of cementum
    • Explain basic concepts and priniciples of periodontal pathology
    • Describe specific microorganisms related to the development of periodontal pathologies


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 247 Tooth Morphology

    2 credits
    In this course, students are introduced to the science of dental morphology, tooth identification systems, exfoliation/eruption patterns, and basic occlusion of the permanent and primary dentition. This course focuses on the healthy, normal end of the health/disease continuum and provides a foundation for further dental science study as well as for clinical dental hygiene practice.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Hygiene program

    Corequisites: DHYG 242 , DHYG 243 , DHYG 246 , and DHYG 256  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define anatomical terminology of the dentition
    • Describe the arrangement of teeth
    • Describe the general features of teeth
    • Identify and describe the contact areas of the teeth
    • Describe specific crown and root characteristics
    • Describe the characteristics of deciduous teeth
    • Define occlusion terminology, ideal occlusion, open bite, overbite, and overjet
    • Identify and describe specific teeth
    • Describe occlusal classifications


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 248 Dental Hygiene Research I

    2 credits
    This introductory course familiarizes students with the basic foundation of research, research methodologies, research design, and evidence-based decision making. Principles of research are examined as a basis for the analysis and critique of professional literature. Students are introduced to concepts of research-based dental hygiene practice.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 242 , DHYG 243 , DHYG 246 , DHYG 247 , and DHYG 256  

    Corequisites: DHYG 252 , DHYG 253 , DHYG 254 , and DHYG 258  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Conduct a computerized search to identify current research on oral disease and treatment modalities 
    • Analyze research articles for validity and reliability, including research methodologies
    • Explain the relationship of research to health oriented dental hygiene practice
    • Identify research publications that are pertinent to dental hygiene and related disciplines
    • Describe research methodologies employed in dental hygiene and related disciplines
    • Identify and research a current topic and relate the information to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Identify reliable resources for information on topics pertaining to the discipline of dental hygiene
    • Apply and correlate ethically conducted research


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 252 Dental Hygiene Theory and Practice I

    6 credits
    Basic concepts of dental hygiene practice are presented. The emphasis is on preparation and assessment procedures with an introduction to dental hygiene diagnosis and planning. Students learn selected implementation, evaluation, and practice management procedures.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 242 , DHYG 243 , DHYG 246 , DHYG 247 , and DHYG 256  

    Corequisites: DHYG 248 , DHYG 253 , DHYG 254 , and DHYG 258  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe concepts and perform procedures related to aspects of preparation, assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation, and practice management in the dental hygiene profession
    • Apply the critical thinking process to complete the dental hygiene diagnosis form
    • Apply basic principles of learning when providing dental hygiene care to clients
    • Communicate effectively with patients and colleagues in a dental clinic
    • Identify pertinent information needed to determine appropriate dental hygiene treatment
    • Collaborate with the dental team when providing dental hygiene care
    • Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for their own actions
    • Apply basic knowledge, values, and skills related to self-evaluation to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Demonstrate professional behavior when providing dental hygiene care
    • Integrate basic behavioral, biological, dental sciences, and professional courses with clinical knowledge, skills, and values into the practice of dental hygiene


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    DHYG 253 Restorative Dentristry I

    3 credits
    Students are introduced to selected dental materials and to basic restorative dentistry procedures and techniques. The course is designed to give students a working knowledge of skills required for restorative dentistry.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 242 , DHYG 246 , DHYG 247 , and DHYG 256  

    Corequisites: DHYG 248 , DHYG 252 , DHYG 254 , and DHYG 258  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe classes of dental materials used in dentistry
    • List the purpose and usefulness of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for all products introduced in this course
    • Define the general properties and characteristics of dental materials
    • Descibe the properties, characteristics and uses of dental materials introduced this quarter, and principles for manipulation
    • Manipulate and apply the dental materials introduced this quarter, following manufacturers’ directions, and safety precautions
    • Demonstrate the principles of selected restorative dentistry skills and procedures, including self-evaluation criteria


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 254 Head and Neck Anatomy

    2 credits
    In this course students are introduced to structures of the head and neck and the oral cavity. The course focuses on the healthy, normal end of the health/disease continuum and provides a foundation for further dental science study.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 242 , DHYG 243 , DHYG 246 , DHYG 247 , and DHYG 256  

    Corequisites: DHYG 248 , DHYG 252 , DHYG 253 , and DHYG 258  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define anatomical terms related to the planes of the human body
    • Describe the blood vessels that supply the head and neck
    • List the action, origin, and insertion of muscles of the head and neck
    • Describe the nerves of the head and neck
    • Describe lymphatic drainage of the head and neck
    • Describe the anatomy and function of the oral mucosa, salivary glands, and nasal cavity
    • Explain breath odor, including biochemical concepts
    • List the bones of the head and neck
    • Describe intra-oral soft tissue structures


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 256 Dental Imaging

    3 credits
    This course introduces radiology as a diagnostic aid, and includes the concepts and principles of x-radiation, x-ray generation, and radiation protection.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Hygiene program

    Corequisites: DHYG 242 , DHYG 243 , DHYG 246 , and DHYG 247  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • List the basic principles of radiation biology and the uses of x-radiation in dentistry
    • Describe the concepts of x-radiation generation and radiation protection
    • Apply radiographic imaging and imaging techniques for periapical and bitewing radiographs
    • Apply principles of processing, and processing and mounting technique
    • Describe the characteristics and landmarks of periapical and bitewing radiographs


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 258 Oral Disease Prevention

    2 credits
    Students are introduced to basic principles of dental diseases and conditions of the oral cavity. Students will learn concepts of preventive oral health, patient oral self-care, and ergonomics for the dental practitioner.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 242 , DHYG 243 , DHYG 246 , DHYG 247 , and DHYG 256  

    Corequisites: DHYG 248 , DHYG 252 , DHYG 253 , and DHYG 254  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the dental caries process and its treatment and prevention strategies
    • Describe the three types of fluorides, their applications, and their relation to the caries process
    • List and explain anti-microbial medicaments in the treatment of dental disease
    • Describe the process of dentinal hypersensitivity and its treatment options
    • Explain the importance of dental sealants and their application procedure for the prevention of dental caries
    • Describe the processes, uses, and potential side effects of tooth whitening and coronal polish
    • Identify the various intraoral stains, their etiology, and methods of removal
    • Describe the basic principles of occlusion and their relationship to temporomandibular dysfunction
    • Assess the patient’s individual needs and make appropriate recommendations for post-operative care for healing of the periodontal tissues
    • Identify the requirements of special needs patients in the use of dental self- care aids
    • Describe, properly utilize, and list the limitations of oral hygiene aids, such as tooth brush and floss
    • Make appropriate recommendations to the dental patient regarding oral hygiene aids and medicaments after identifying the  patient’s oral conditions
    • Explain the importance of ergonomics for the dental practitioner and use the neutral position to aid in attaining career longevity


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 321 Electronic Health Records

    1 credit
    This introductory course prepares students to utilize electronic records in a dental practice. Students will receive hands-on training using dental practice management software. Topics will include legal document compliance and system protocols and policies.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 248 , DHYG 253 , DHYG 254 , and DHYG 258  

    Corequisites: DHYG 322 , DHYG 323 , DHYG 324 , DHYG 325 , DHYG 326 , and DHYG 329  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the role of electronic health records in dentistry
    • Demonstrate the use of dental practice management software to manage a patient’s chart notes, images, and other assessment findings
    • Create a comprehensive dental treatment plan in the system
    • Obtain patient informed consent


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 322 Dental Hygiene Theory and Practice II

    6 credits
    This lecture and clinical course is a continuation of DHYG 252 Dental Hygiene Theory and Practice I . This course covers preparation, assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation, and practice management in the dental hygiene profession. The concepts of teaching, learning, and problem solving (critical thinking) are integrated into clinical practice. New skills and procedures are practiced on mannequins and classmates.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 248 , DHYG 252 , DHYG 253 , DHYG 254 , and DHYG 258  

    Corequisites: DHYG 321 , DHYG 323 , DHYG 324 , DHYG 325 , DHYG 326 , and DHYG 329  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe concepts related to aspects of preparation, assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation, and practice management in the dental hygiene profession
    • Apply the problem-solving process to formulate a dental hygiene diagnosis
    • Apply basic principles of teaching and learning when providing dental hygiene care to clients
    • Communicate effectively with patients and colleagues in a dental clinic
    • Document pertinent information needed to determine appropriate dental hygiene treatment
    • Collaborate with the dental team when providing dental hygiene care
    • Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for their own actions
    • Apply basic knowledge, values, and skills related to self-evaluation
    • Demonstrate professional behavior when providing dental hygiene care
    • Integrate basic behavioral, biological, dental sciences, and professional courses with clinical knowledge, skills, and values into the practice of dental hygiene


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
  •  

    DHYG 323 Restorative Dentristry II

    1 credit
    This course is a continuation of DHYG 253 Restorative Dentristry I  and builds on previously introduced principles of restorative dentistry and corresponding armamentarium. Students learn additional dental hygiene skills related to the placement of amalgam, composite, and temporary restorations.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 248 , DHYG 252 , DHYG 253 , DHYG 254 , and DHYG 258  

    Corequisites: DHYG 321 , DHYG 322 , DHYG 324 , DHYG 325 , DHYG 326 , and DHYG 329  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform alginate impressions
    • Develop alginate impressions with plaster and rough model trimming
    • Place and remove rubber dam  
    • Assemble, place, and remove Tofflemire matrix and wedge system
    • Place liners, bases, varnish, and other selected cavity medicaments
    • Place, condense, and carve Class I, II, and V amalgam restorations   
    • Place and finish Class I, III, and V composite restorations 
    • Place temporary restorations
    • Recontour, finish, and polish previously placed amalgam restorations


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 324 Ethics and Jurisprudence

    2 credits
    Students are introduced to dental hygiene professional ethics, principles and values, laws, scope of practice, and regulation.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 248 , DHYG 252 , DHYG 253 , DHYG 254 , and DHYG 258  

    Corequisites: DHYG 321 , DHYG 323 , DHYG 325 , DHYG 326 , and DHYG 329  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and demonstrate ethical decision making in dental hygiene practice
    • Demonstrate the professional role, principles, values, and responsibilities of the dental hygienist related to the community, dental profession, dental team, and client
    • Identify and manage ethical issues in the practice of dental hygiene
    • Identify the components of the American Dental Hygiene Association (ADHA) Code of Ethics
    • Compare and discuss the Revised Code of Washington (RCW) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) of dental hygiene
    • Identify and describe the role of the dental hygiene regulatory agency
    • Outline the dental hygiene scope of practice
    • Identify the scope of practice for other dental professionals


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 325 Histology and Embryology

    2 credits
    In this course students broaden their focus of the health-disease continuum through the study of histology and embryology. Students study human development from conception to birth, with emphasis on structures of the head and neck.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 248 , DHYG 252 , DHYG 253 , DHYG 254 , and DHYG 256  

    Corequisites: DHYG 321 , DHYG 322 , DHYG 323 , DHYG 324 , DHYG 326 , and DHYG 329  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the stages in prenatal development of the face, neck, and orofacial structures
    • Explain the processes of tooth development and eruption
    • Describe the components of the cell and tissues
    • Identify components of the oral mucosa and gingival and dentogingival tissues
    • Describe the stages in the development of enamel, dentin, pulp, and the periodontium


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 326 Radiographic Interpretation

    2 credits
    This course builds on the scientific foundation established in DHYG 256. The focus along the health-disease continuum shifts toward basic concepts of disease at the cellular and clinical level. Students take radiographs on clinical clients and study the interpretation of radiographs to assist with formulation of the dental hygiene diagnosis.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 248 , DHYG 252 , DHYG 253 , DHYG 254 , and DHYG 258  

    Corequisites: DHYG 321 , DHYG 322 , DHYG 323 , DHYG 324 , DHYG 325 , and DHYG 329  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain advanced concepts and techniques of intraoral radiographic imaging
    • Identify radiographic images and interpret the findings
    • Complete intraoral and panoramic radiographs
    • Explain advanced concepts and techniques of panoramic radiography
    • Identify problems with panoramic techniques and images
    • Identify normal intraoral radiographic anatomy and landmarks
    • Identify and diagnose periodontal disease and bone loss based on radiographic appearance
    • Explain the localization radiographic technique used to locate foreign objects in the oral cavity


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 329 General Pathology

    2 credits
    This course builds on the scientific foundation established in DHYG 246 and 325.  The focus along the health-disease continuum shifts toward basic concepts of disease. Students identify the general mechanisms of disease and health problems in each of the body systems. Basic concepts of immunity, infection, and inflammation as they affect total body wellness or illness are discussed. Terminology is explained as it pertains to body systems and to diseases and health problems. Students learn the definition and description of the basic features of a disease, the etiology, the predisposing factors that may influence the development process, and the signs and symptoms of various diseases. Greater emphasis is placed on specific disease entities as related to the settings and practices of dental hygiene.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 248 , DHYG 252 , DHYG 253 , DHYG 254 , and DHYG 258  

    Corequisites: DHYG 321 , DHYG 322 , DHYG 323 , DHYG 324 , DHYG 325 , and DHYG 326  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain pathological processes that underlie diseases that affect the human body, including the process of inflammation, infection, immunity and tissue repair and healing
    • Identify etiologies and other characteristics of systemic diseases which are encountered by dental hygienists and which may affect the care and treatment of the dental patient
    • Explain pathological processes in the body that may affect the dental hygienists’ ability to provide dental care and treatment to the patient and/or that may necessitate possible adjustment in the treatment planning and execution of care due to the patient’s specific medical history
    • Explain specific characteristic signs and symptoms and the possible etiology or causative factors in the development of diseases
    • Identify various methods of diagnosing and treating diseases
    •  Explain the prognosis of various disease entities and the factors to prevent disease from occurring
    • Apply terminology relating to the disease process and abnormal disease entities


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 331 Dental Hygiene Research II

    2 credits
    This course builds on DHYG 248 Dental Hygiene Research I . Students will apply the basic principles of research and develop analytical skills for evaluation of professional research.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 321 , DHYG 323 , DHYG 324 , DHYG 325 , DHYG 326 , and DHYG 329  

    Corequisites: DHYG 332 , DHYG 333 , DHYG 335 , DHYG 336 , and DHYG 338  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the relationship between theory and research
    • Discuss the role of evidence-based decision making in healthcare
    • Apply ethical guidelines in evaluating the collection, storage, and use of data from human subjects
    • Research current, relevant topics and trends impacting oral health
    • Identify program design, data collection strategies, and evaluation activities
    • Critically analyze research articles for validity and reliability, including research methodologies, for use in reports and application of dental hygiene care
    • Access reliable resources for information on topics pertaining to the discipline of dental hygiene
    • Conduct research using resources to study pathologic diseases impacting the oral cavity
    • Formulate research questions
    • Distinguish between observations, interviews, and surveys for collecting research data


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    DHYG 332 Dental Hygiene Theory and Practice III

    7 credits
    This lecture and lab course is a continuation of DHYG 322 Dental Hygiene Theory and Practice II . Students expand their focus to include unhealthy and abnormal oral conditions and special needs of patients in today’s diverse communities.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 321 , DHYG 322 , DHYG 323 , DHYG 324 , DHYG 325 , DHYG 326 , and DHYG 329  

    Corequisites: DHYG 331 DHYG 333 , DHYG 335 , DHYG 336 , and DHYG 338  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe concepts and perform procedures related to aspects of preparation, assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation, and practice management in the dental hygiene profession
    • Apply the problem-solving process to complete a dental hygiene diagnosis
    • Apply basic principles of learning and teaching when providing dental hygiene care to clients
    • Communicate effectively with patients and colleagues in a dental clinic
    • Gather pertinent information needed to determine appropriate dental hygiene treatment
    • Collaborate effectively with the dental team when providing dental hygiene care
    • Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for their own actions
    • Apply basic knowledge, values, and skills related to self-evaluation
    • Demonstrate professional behavior when providing dental hygiene care
    • Integrate basic behavioral, biological, dental sciences, and professional courses with clinical knowledge, skills, and values into the practice of dental hygiene


    Total Hours: 120 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 100
  
  •  

    DHYG 333 Restorative Dentristry III

    1 credit
    This laboratory course builds on the skills introduced in DHYG 323 Restorative Dentistry II. Students continue to develop restorative dentistry skills on dentoform mannequins in preparation for client clinics and the WREB Restorative Exam. Students continue to study anatomy through amalgam carvings to determine hypothetical anesthetic and rubber dam selection for all restorative procedures completed in lab.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 321 , DHYG 322 , DHYG 323 , DHYG 324 , DHYG 325 , DHYG 326 , and DHYG 329  

    Corequisites: DHYG 331 , DHYG 332 , DHYG 335 , DHYG 336 , and DHYG 338  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Complete alginate impressions
    • Pour alginate impressions with plaster and rough model trimming
    • Demonstrate rubber dam placement
    • Demonstrate correct placement and use of Tofflemire matrix and wedge system
    • Place liners, bases, varnish, and other selected cavity medicaments
    • Demonstrate placement of Class I, II, and V amalgam restorations  
    • Demonstrate placement and finish Class I, II, III, IV, and V composite restorations
    • Remove overhangs on amalgam and composite restorations
    • Place temporary restorations
    • Demonstrate placement of sealants
    • Re-contour, finish, and polish previously placed amalgam restorations


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 335 Community Dental Health I

    2 credits
    Students study the health-disease continuum from the viewpoint of the community, the basic concepts of community dental health, and the community dental health Process of Care model. Students examine multicultural issues and attitudes regarding dental care.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 321 , DHYG 322 , DHYG 323 , DHYG 324 , DHYG 325 , DHYG 326 , and DHYG 329  

    Corequisites: DHYG 331 , DHYG 332 , DHYG 333 , DHYG 336 , and DHYG 338  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe a health promotion community project
    • Describe basic concepts of community dental health
    • Explain the role of dental hygienists in oral and general health and wellness promotion in the community
    • Explain the assessment, diagnosis, planning, and implementation phases of community health promotion programming
    • Describe the Process of Care model for healthy communities 
    • Explain issues regarding access to dental health services in the United States
    • Identify individual and community issues related to cultural diversity in dentistry
    • Explain the role of the dental hygienist as an agent for change


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    DHYG 336 Dental Pharmacology


    Students explore general principles of pharmacology including drug action and uses, physiological and therapeutic effects, classifications, interactions, side effects, and systemic and oral manifestations, with application to the specific systemic and oral conditions that they affect. Drugs commonly encountered and prescribed in the dental office are emphasized.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 321 , DHYG 323 , DHYG 324 , DHYG 325 , DHYG 326 , and DHYG 329  

    Corequisites: DHYG 331 , DHYG 332 , DHYG 333 , DHYG 335 , and DHYG 338  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Explain the role of pharmacology in dental hygiene care
    • Identify reliable sources for drug information
    • Explain the process of new drug approval, drug regulation, and drug safety
    • Describe the process of prescription writing
    • Describe drug abuse, including patterns of abuse, and implications for dental care
    • Explain the basic principles of drug action and how drugs are handled by the body
    • List and describe drugs used in dental practice and by dental patients
    • Explain the relationship of different drugs to the conditions that they treat
    • Identify potential adverse effects and interactions of prescription and over-the-counter drugs


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    DHYG 338 Pain Control

    2 credits
    Students study topics pertinent to pain control in a dental office setting. General concepts of pain perception, pharmacology of pain control drugs, and nitrous oxide sedation are presented and discussed. Students evaluate each client for appropriate pain control drug choices and/or techniques.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 321 , DHYG 323 , DHYG 324 , DHYG 325 , DHYG 326 , and DHYG 329  

    Corequisites: DHYG 331 , DHYG 332 , DHYG 333 , DHYG 335 , and DHYG 336  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the pharmacology of local and topical anesthetics
    • Explain local anesthetic procedures and techniques
    • Prepare and use local anesthetic armamentarium
    • Evaluate the medical history of the client prior to using a local anesthetic
    • Identify complications and emergencies that could occur after administering an anesthetic to a patient
    • Perform specific injections for maxillary and mandibular anesthesia, such as infiltrations, field blocks, nerve blocks, and aspirations
    • Choose proper needle size for intraoral injections
    • Determine insertion site, depth of penetration, and amount of anesthetic solution to be deposited
    • Explain the pharmacology of nitrous oxide
    • Perform nitrous oxide sedation procedures on clinical patients


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    DHYG 341 Professional Practicum


    This course introduces essential skills required to pursue alternative career paths and includes preparation of a professional development plan and introduction of a capstone project and professional portfolio.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 331 , DHYG 332 , DHYG 333 , DHYG 335 , DHYG 336 , and DHYG 338  

    Corequisites: DHYG 342 , DHYG 343 , DHYG 345 , DHYG 346 , and DHYG 349  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Compare and contrast traditional or historical roles with current/modern roles of the professional dental hygienist
    • Identify alternative professional roles a dental hygienist may pursue outside of clinical dental hygiene
    • Research professional roles available to the dental hygiene professional
    • Develop a comprehensive professional plan
    • Identify and describe the capstone project criteria
    • Select a patient suitable for the outlined capstone criteria
    • Identify and describe the professional portfolio criteria
    • Create goals and objectives for completing the professional protfolio


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 342 Dental Hygiene Theory and Practice IV

    7 credits
    This course is a continuation of the Dental Hygiene Theory and Practice clinical and didactic courses. Students participate in a weekly seminar integrating values, knowledge, and skills learned from other courses. The ability to plan and implement individualized, comprehensive dental hygiene care is further developed as patients with more complex needs are treated. Emphasis is also given to the prevention of oral problems through the identification of risk factors and through the planning of clinical, educational, and motivational interventions. Students continue to provide care to clients from diverse communities and incorporate knowledge from traditional dental hygiene, restorative dentistry, and community dental health into dental hygiene practice.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 331 , DHYG 332 , DHYG 333 , DHYG 335 , DHYG 336 , and DHYG 338  

    Corequisites: DHYG 341 , DHYG 343 , DHYG 345 , DHYG 346 , and DHYG 349  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform selected preparation, assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation, and practice management procedures, with minimal or no guidance, ensuring client comfort and safety
    • Discuss concepts and principles related to selected aspects of preparation, assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation, and practice management
    • Apply the problem solving process using critical thinking skills, with some guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Apply the principles of teaching and learning, with some guidance, when providing dental hygiene care to clients
    • Apply basic principles of interpersonal communication, with some guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Apply basic research skills, with guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Collaborate with the dental team, with some guidance, when providing dental hygiene care
    • Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for own actions, with minimal guidance
    • Apply basic knowledge, values, and skills related to self- evaluation, with some guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Demonstrate professional behavior, with minimal guidance, when providing dental hygiene care
    • Integrate basic behavioral, biological, dental science, and professional courses with clinical knowledge, skills, and values, with some guidance, into the practice of dental hygiene


    Total Hours: 130 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 120
  
  •  

    DHYG 343 Restorative Dentristry IV

    1 credit
    This laboratory course builds on the skills introduced in DHYG 333 Restorative Dentristry III . Students continue to develop restorative dentistry skills on dentoform mannequins in preparation for client clinics. These skills include rubber dam placement, composite restorations, amalgam restorations, and amalgam polishing/margination and use of the high and slow speed handpiece. Students use critical thinking skills to determine hypothetical anesthetic and rubber dam selection for all restorative procedures done in lab.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 331 , DHYG 332 , DHYG 333 , DHYG 335 , DHYG 336 , and DHYG 338  

    Corequisites: DHYG 341 , DHYG 342 , DHYG 345 , DHYG 346 , and DHYG 349  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform alginate impressions
    • Pour alginate impressions with plaster and rough model trimming
    • Place and remove rubber dam  
    • Assemble, place, and remove Tofflemire matrix and wedge system
    • Place liners, bases, varnish, and other selected cavity medicaments
    • Place, condense, and carve Class I, II, and V amalgam restorations   
    • Place and finish Class I, II, III, IV, and V composite restorations
    • Remove overhangs on amalgam and composite restorations
    • Place temporary restorations
    • Place sealants
    • Re-contour, finish, and polish previously placed amalgam restorations


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 345 Community Dental Health II

    1 credit
    This course is a continuation of DHYG 335 Community Dental Health I , consisting of both clinical extern assignments and project assignments. In this course students concentrate on the implementation phase of their community health projects. Students will also begin their clinical procedures at extern rotations.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 331 , DHYG 332 , DHYG 333 , DHYG 335 , DHYG 336 , and DHYG 338  

    Corequisites: DHYG 341 , DHYG 342 , DHYG 343 , DHYG 346 , and DHYG 349  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform clinical dental hygiene services at assigned community extern sites
    • Identify the implementation phase of the community dental health project


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 346 Periodontology II

    2 credits
    This course builds on DHYG 246 Periodontology I . The focus along the health/disease continuum shifts toward basic concepts of disease at the cellular level. The study of periodontics is broadened to include common periodontal pathologies and their microbiological basis.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 331 , DHYG 332 , DHYG 333 , DHYG 335 , DHYG 336 , and DHYG 338  

    Corequisites: DHYG 341 , DHYG 342 , DHYG 343 , DHYG 345 , and DHYG 349  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain basic concepts and principles of periodontal pathology and list the major bacteria associated with periodontitis
    • Explain the major components of the immune system and the differences between innate immunity and adaptive immunity
    • Describe the periodontium and classify periodontitis
    • Describe normal flora of the mouth versus dental plaque versus bacteria associated with disease
    • Describe the different antimicrobial/antibiotic agents used to treat periodontitis
    • Explain substantivity as it relates to antimicrobial agents
    • Explain the differences between first-generation agents and second-generation agents
    • Explain the need for periodontal maintenance therapy


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 349 Special Populations

    2 credits
    This course focuses on concepts of wellness and research-based dental hygiene practice. The student is introduced to the special needs of patients, to dental specialties, and to the concept of multi-disciplinary health care consultations and referrals.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 331 , DHYG 332 , DHYG 333 , DHYG 335 , DHYG 336 , and DHYG 338  

    Corequisites: DHYG 341 , DHYG 342 , DHYG 343 , DHYG 345 , and DHYG 346  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Refer patients to different dental specialties depending on their needs
    • Explain dental hygiene referral relationships with general and specialty dental practices
    • Explain a multidisciplinary team approach to client care
    • Use appropriate terminology to facilitate communication with members of allied professions and the public relating to the special needs of clients
    • Collaborate with clients with special needs and their care givers for dental hygiene care
    • Apply current research relating to the special needs of clients and how to properly care for their dental needs


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 412 Dental Hygiene Theory and Practice V

    10 credits
    This combined lecture and clinical course continues from the first year Dental Hygiene Theory and Practice courses. The scope of practice increases to include patients with a higher degree of difficulty and periodontal involvement. Advanced instrumentation techniques are incorporated into clinical care, and an increased level of independence and sophistication is demonstrated. Students interpret and synthesize information gathered from dental hygiene exams and risk assessments to plan and prioritize patient centered, comprehensive care. Restorative procedures are integrated into clinic and performed side-by-side with dental assisting students. The weekly lecture seminar includes didactic theory applicable to a more advanced level of clinical practice and provides an opportunity for clinical questions and class discussions.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 341 , DHYG 342 , DHYG 343 , DHYG 345 , DHYG 346 , and DHYG 349  

    Corequisites: DHYG 413 , DHYG 415 , and DHYG 416  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform selected preparation, assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation, and practice management procedures, with minimal or no guidance, ensuring client’s comfort and safety
    • Discuss concepts and principles related to selected aspects of preparation, assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation, and practice management
    • Apply the problem solving process using critical thinking skills, with some guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Apply the principles of teaching and learning, with some guidance, when providing dental hygiene care to clients
    • Apply basic principles of interpersonal communication, with some guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Apply basic research skills, with guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Collaborate with the dental team, with some guidance, when providing dental hygiene care
    • Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for own actions, with minimal guidance
    • Apply basic knowledge, values, and skills related to self- evaluation, with some guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Demonstrate professional behavior, with minimal guidance, when providing dental hygiene care
    • Integrate basic behavioral, biological, dental science, and professional courses with clinical knowledge, skills, and values, with some guidance, into the practice of dental hygiene


    Total Hours: 170 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 140
  
  •  

    DHYG 413 Restorative Dentistry V

    3 credits
    This course is a continuation of DHYG 343 Restorative Dentristry IV  and builds on previously introduced principles of restorative dentistry and corresponding armamentarium.  Students learn additional dental hygiene skills related to the placement of amalgam, composite, and sealants.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 341 , DHYG 342 , DHYG 343 , DHYG 345 , DHYG 346 , and DHYG 349  

    Corequisites: DHYG 412 , DHYG 415 , and DHYG 416  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Complete one set of study models
    • Place and remove rubber dam on patient
    • Assemble, place, and remove Tofflemire matrix and wedge system on patient
    • Place liners, bases, varnish, and other selected cavity medicaments on patient
    • Place, condense, and carve Class I, II, and V amalgam restorations  
    • Place and finish Class I, II, III, IV and V composite restorations
    • Remove overhangs on amalgam and composite restorations
    • Place temporary restorations
    • Place sealants on a child or adolescent
    • Re-contour, finish, and polish previously placed amalgam restorations


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    DHYG 415 Community Dental Health III

    3 credits
    In this course, students continue the implementation phase of their clinical/health promotion community externship projects. During class time, they are introduced to concepts of epidemiological trends, community health research, and marketing strategies for community dental health education and promotion. In addition, students further study multi-cultural issues, attitudes, and beliefs.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 341 , DHYG 342 , DHYG 343 , DHYG 345 , DHYG 346 , and DHYG 349  

    Corequisites: DHYG 412 , DHYG 413 , and DHYG 416  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss National Dental Hygiene Month
    • Describe epidemiological concepts and trends as they relate to oral health
    • Describe research methodologies related to oral health
    • Define and discuss the concept of English as a second language (ESL)
    • Define the cultural diversity of our communities and personal and community issues related to cultural diversity


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 416 Oral Pathology I

    2 credits
    This course builds on the first year Dental Science courses and continues to focus on aspects of the health/disease continuum. Topics covered include oral and periodontal pathologies.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 341 , DHYG 342 , DHYG 343 , DHYG 345 , DHYG 346 , and DHYG 349  

    Corequisites: DHYG 412 , DHYG 413 , and DHYG 415  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain specific soft and hard tissue pathologies of the orofacial region
    • Perform extra oral and intra oral exams to detect hard and soft tissue pathologies
    • Recognize pathologies of the teeth
    • Classify specific periodontal pathologies


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 422 Dental Hygiene Theory and Practive VI

    11 credits
    This lecture and clinical course is a continuation from DHYG 412 Dental Hygiene Theory and Practice V . Students demonstrate competence in various procedures as they build on existing knowledge and their clinical skills continue to progress. The focus is expanded to include increasingly advanced periodontal cases. Risk factors related to oral health are assessed and considered in the treatment plan as the dental hygiene process of care continues to be centered on evidence-based modalities with a preventive focus. Restorative procedures are performed side-by-side with dental assisting students and are integrated into the clinical course. Concurrently, the students participate in a weekly lecture seminar integrating clinical theory, values, and ethics.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 412 , DHYG 413 , DHYG 415 , and DHYG 416  

    Corequisites: DHYG 423 , DHYG 425 , and DHYG 426  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform selected preparation, assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation, and practice management procedures, with minimal or no guidance, ensuring client comfort and safety
    • Discuss concepts and principles related to selected aspects of preparation, assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation, and practice management
    • Apply the problem solving process using critical thinking skills, with minimal guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Apply the principles of teaching and learning, with minimal guidance, when providing dental hygiene care to clients
    • Apply basic principles of interpersonal communication, with minimal guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Apply basic research skills, with minimal guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Collaborate with the dental team, with minimal guidance, when providing dental hygiene care
    • Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for own actions, with no guidance
    • Apply basic knowledge, values, and skills related to self- evaluation, with minimal guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Demonstrate professional behavior, with minimal guidance, when providing dental hygiene care
    • Integrate basic behavioral, biological, dental science, and professional courses with clinical knowledge, skills, and values, with guidance, into the practice of dental hygiene


    Total Hours: 190 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 160
  
  •  

    DHYG 423 Restorative Dentistry VI

    3 credits
    This course is a continuation of DHYG 413 Restorative Dentistry V  and builds on previously introduced principles of restorative dentistry and corresponding armamentarium. Students learn additional dental hygiene skills related to the placement of amalgam, composite, and sealants.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 412 , DHYG 413 , DHYG 415 , and DHYG 416  

    Corequisites: DHYG 422 , DHYG 425 , and DHYG 426  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform alginate impressions
    • Pour alginate impressions with plaster and rough model trimming
    • Place and remove rubber dam 
    • Assemble, place, and remove Tofflemire matrix and wedge system
    • Place liners, bases, varnish, and other selected cavity medicaments
    • Place, condense, and carve Class I, II, and V amalgam restorations  
    • Place and finish Class I, II, III, IV, and V composite restorations
    • Remove overhangs on amalgam and composite restorations
    • Place temporary restorations
    • Place sealants
    • Re-contour, finish, and polish previously placed amalgam restorations


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    DHYG 425 Community Dental Health IV

    2 credits
    This course is a continuation of the previous community dental health courses. Students study global multi-cultural issues and concerns, and continue their clinical/health promotion community externship project.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 412 , DHYG 413 , DHYG 415 , and DHYG 416  

    Corequisites: DHYG 422 , DHYG 423 , and DHYG 426  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define the concept of community health partnerships
    • Explain partnerships between special population groups and health professionals that contribute to building healthy communities
    • Define the evaluation phase of  community health programming
    • Explain all phases of the clinic/health promotion community project, including recommendations for further programming


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 426 Oral Pathology II

    2 credits
    This course builds on DHYG 416 Oral Pathology I . Disease aspects of the health/disease continuum are further explored. Advanced concepts of immunology are presented. Case studies facilitate preparation of student presentations of clinical cases. Oral pathological concepts as they relate to the continued study of periodontal pathologies are discussed.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 412 , DHYG 413 , DHYG 415 , and DHYG 416  

    Corequisites: DHYG 422 , DHYG 423 , and DHYG 425  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define specific soft and hard tissue pathologies of the orofacial region
    • Explain methods for detecting and recording hard tissue pathological observations
    • Describe pathologies of the teeth and periodontium
    • Demonstrate specific periodontal therapies, including their techniques, applications, and limitations
    • Complete a pathology/periodontal research project


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DHYG 432 Dental Hygiene Theory and Practice VII

    10 credits
    This is the final lecture seminar and clinical course in the Dental Hygiene Theory and Practice series. Knowledge, values, and skills are synthesized to provide comprehensive dental hygiene care at an exit level of program competence. The weekly lecture seminar integrates all other courses (i.e. Dental Sciences, Restorative Dentistry, Community Dental Health, and Principles and Issues in Dental Hygiene) into the practice of dental hygiene and emphasizes practical application and preparation for entry into the practice of dental hygiene.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 422 , DHYG 423 , DHYG 425 , and DHYG 426  

    Corequisites: DHYG 433 , DHYG 434 , DHYG 435 , and DHYG 438  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss concepts and principles related to selected aspects of preparation, assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation, and practice management
    • Perform selected preparation, assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation, and practice management procedures, with minimal or no guidance, ensuring client comfort and safety
    • Apply the problem-solving process, with minimal or no guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Apply basic principles of teaching and learning, with minimal or no guidance, when providing dental hygiene care to clients
    • Apply basic principles of interpersonal communication, with minimal or no guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    •  Apply basic research skills, with minimal or no guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Collaborate with the dental team, with minimal or no guidance, when providing dental hygiene care
    • Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for actions, with minimal or no guidance, as they relate to private practice
    • Apply basic knowledge, values, and skills related to self-evaluation, with minimal or no guidance, to the practice of dental hygiene
    • Demonstrate professional behavior, with minimal or no guidance, when providing dental hygiene care          
    • Integrate basic behavioral, biological, dental sciences, and professional courses with clinical knowledge, skills, and values, with minimal or no guidance, into the practice of dental hygiene


    Total Hours: 180 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 160
  
  •  

    DHYG 433 Restorative Dentistry VII

    2 credits
    This course is a continuation of DHYG 423 Restorative Dentistry VI  and builds on previously introduced principles of restorative dentistry and corresponding armamentarium.  Students learn additional dental hygiene skills related to the placement of amalgam, composite, and sealants.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 422 , DHYG 423 , DHYG 425 , and DHYG 426  

    Corequisites: DHYG 432 , DHYG 434 , DHYG 435 , and DHYG 438  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Complete alginate impressions at an exit level of competency
    • Pour alginate impressions with plaster and rough model trimming
    • Place and remove rubber dam with minimal guidance
    • Assemble, place, and remove Tofflemire matrix and wedge system
    • Place liners, bases, varnish, and other selected cavity medicaments
    • Place, condense, and carve Class I, II, and V amalgam restorations  
    • Place and finish Class I, II, III, IV, and V composite restorations
    • Remove overhangs on amalgam and composite restorations
    • Place temporary restorations
    • Place sealants
    • Re-contour, finish, and polish previously placed amalgam restorations


    Total Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    DHYG 434 Principles and Issues

    3 credits
    This course prepares students for career, educational, and employment opportunities, completion of licensure, and understanding of continuing education requirements in Washington as well as other states.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 422 , DHYG 423 , DHYG 425 , and DHYG 426  

    Corequisites: DHYG 432 , DHYG 433 , DHYG 435 , and DHYG 438  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe career opportunities for dental hygienists and emerging professional roles
    • Discuss and apply the employment process
    • Define the licensure process for dental hygiene practice
    • Compare and contrast out-of-state licensure and scope-of-practice with the State of Washington and portability of qualifications
    • Evaluate business aspects of dental hygiene practice
    • Justify the dental hygienist as a change agent for various employment settings
    • Identify locations for independent practice of dental hygienists
    • Define trends in oral health care as predictors of future dental hygiene practice education and requirements


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    DHYG 435 Community Dental Health V

    1 credit
    Students continue providing clinical services to special populations at various extern sites using knowledge and skills developed in previous community dental health courses. This course enables the student to synthesize their knowledge about community health partnership programs through creating community project notebooks of their two-year clinical/health promotion community projects.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 422 , DHYG 423 , DHYG 425 , and DHYG 426  

    Corequisites: DHYG 432 , DHYG 433 , DHYG 434 , and DHYG 438  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss all phases of the clinical/health promotion community project
    • Provide assistance to community groups and individuals seeking access to public dental services
    • Demonstrate the ability to interpret, interact with, and respond to the differences and commonalities among people
    • Demonstrate the ability to work cooperatively in a group to advance a common goal
    • Complete patient care at the clinical extern site


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    DHYG 438 Senior Capstone and Portfolio

    2 credits
    This course incorporates major learning themes of the student’s dental hygiene education resulting in a student-generated capstone and portfolio. The capstone and portfolio will encompass the highlights of the student’s research and major projects. Demonstration of the dental hygiene program learning outcomes is achieved through experiential learning, self-analysis, and strategies for completion and presentation of a capstone project and portfolio.

    Prerequisites: DHYG 422 , DHYG 423 , DHYG 425 , and DHYG 426  

    Corequisites: DHYG 432 , DHYG 433 , DHYG 434 , and DHYG 435  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Plan and produce a written summary and self-analysis of the assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation, and documentation of the capstone project
    • Integrate evidence-based research relevant to the treatment and outcomes for the capstone
    • Design, develop, organize, and incorporate program coursework highlights into a portfolio
    • Construct a portfolio
    • Generate a presentation of the capstone project


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20

Design

  
  •  

    DSGN 100 College Success in Design

    2 credits
    This first-quarter course introduces students to the industries of digital design and digital gaming and surveys the resources available through the college and on campus. Topics discussed will include the degrees and certificates offered, skills needed in current creative industries, future employment pathways, and surveys of industry standard software commonly used. Students will gain the resources needed to make well-informed decisions about education and creative career goals and develop the personal and academic tools to help make those goals a reality.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the different degree and certificate options and course formats offered within the design program
    • Make well-informed choices while pursuing design degrees and areas of specialization
    • Utilize an academic planning sheet to set and achieve short-term and long-term college goals
    • Describe the importance of advising day and meeting regularly with an advisor
    • Participate in a range of Canvas (LMS) features, activities, and tasks
    • Identify strategies to maximize personal learning styles, build good time management and project management skills, and manage stress and health during college
    • Navigate campus resources using the college website and web tools
    • Describe the types of job opportunities in a range of creative fields
    • Identify the types of industry standard software, hardware, web and cloud-based tools, process work, and portfolio formats commonly utilized throughout a variety of creative disciplines
    • Uphold professional standards, ethics, and copyright/fair use for creative media careers
    • Observe best practices in file naming and file management


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    DSGN 101 Digital Foundations

    5 credits
    This hands-on foundation course introduces first quarter students to the broad range of software, hardware, technical skills, and best practices necessary to excel in different areas of the multimedia industry. Students will gain a basic understanding of the processes and programs involved in designing for print, web, and mobile devices, producing videos, photos, and animated imagery. Additional emphasis will be given in best practices of file management and copyright.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the different programs offered within the MMDP department and make informed choices for their future areas of specialization
    • Gain hands-on experience with industry standard software and hardware in a variety of disciplines
    • Follow professional standards, ethics, and copyright laws as related to industry
    • Properly name and manage files in a manner suited for industry
    • Understand the difference between destructive and non-destructive editing
    • Use a learning management system
    • Differentiate between raster and vector graphics and identify specific software programs that create these graphics


  
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    DSGN 117 Typography

    4 credits


    This course covers typographic fundamentals, type history, and design considerations when working with type for print and screen based devices. Topics include type categories, kerning and spacing, type anatomy, hierarchy and grids, concordant, conflicting and contrasting type styles, type identification strategies, type rules, and font purchasing. Major historical and contemporary figures, written resources and trends of typographic design will be discussed.

    Prerequisites: ART 102  

    DSGN 126  recommended

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of basic type principles and type history
    • Analyze type considerations for print publications and screen-based devices, including legibility and readability
    • Identify basic typeface categories
    • Demonstrate knowledge of professional type practices through projects and exercises
    • Define the differences of concordant, conflicting and contrasting type and demonstrate best practices when selecting and using these combinations
    • Respectfully present, defend, and critique design choices in a group setting


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    DSGN 121 Vector Illustration 1 with Illustrator

    4 credits
    This course covers basic and intermediate illustration tools and techniques available in Adobe Illustrator. Students will learn skills to produce vector-based artwork for web, multimedia, and print graphics. Emphasis is placed on proficiency with Illustrator’s pen tool.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Navigate the Illustrator environment and use appropriate  tools and palettes for a given task
    • Create basic and complex shapes using the pen tool
    • Apply color using strokes, fills, and painting tools
    • Use brushes and symbols
    • Organize artwork efficiently using layers and object stacking
    • Modify drawn objects by transforming and applying effects to them
    • Transfer scanned artwork or digital image to a vector-based illustration
    • Identify appropriate deliverable file formats for various media (web, print, handheld devices)


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    DSGN 122 Image Editing 1 with Photoshop

    4 credits
    This course covers basic image editing tools and techniques available in Adobe Photoshop. Students will learn skills to produce raster-based images for web, multimedia, and print.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Navigate the Photoshop environment and use appropriate  tools and palettes for a given task
    • Perform basic image correction on images from scans and digital cameras, including color, exposure, and sharpening
    • Explain the appropriate use of RGB and CMYK color spaces
    • Explain the implications of resolution & image size
    • Select and modify areas of images using a variety of tools and methods, including color selection tools, masks, channels, lasso and pen tools
    • Organize artwork using layers, layer sets/comps, and adjustment layers
    • Identify and optimize files for appropriate deliverable file formats for various media (web, print, handheld devices)


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    DSGN 126 Page Layout 1 with InDesign

    4 credits
    This course covers page layout design and production using Adobe InDesign. Simple to moderately complex page design will be completed using tutorials and projects. Students will improve knowledge of layout, typography, and production methods.

    Prerequisites: DSGN 121  or DSGN 122  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Navigate the InDesign environment and use appropriate tools and panels for a given task
    • Use layout tools such as rulers, grids, and frames
    • Effectively use type in printed and digital publications
    • Demonstrate knowledge of design elements and principles in projects
    • Identify properties of vector and raster graphics, choose the optimal file format and resolution for given needs, and manage graphic links
    • Distinguish appropriate color modes and swatch types for a variety of InDesign print and screen workflows including CMYK, spot color and RGB
    • Manipulate layers and object stacking
    • Use special effects appropriately
    • Demonstrate basic knowledge of InDesign interactive features through tutorials and projects
    • Respectfully present, defend, and critique design choices in a group setting


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    DSGN 128 Digital Photography

    4 credits
    This course covers a basic exploration of photography using digital cameras to shoot and edit original photo content. Understanding and applying manual camera controls, creative and technical shooting strategies, composition theory, lighting, and workflow will be addressed using industry standard Adobe software, including Photoshop, Lightroom, and Camera RAW. Access to a digital camera with manual settings is required.

    Prerequisites: DSGN 122  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Proficiently operate digital cameras, including the use of manual exposure, bracketing, depth of field, and motion-blur or stop-motion using aperture and shutter speed settings
    • Make appropriate in-camera decisions, settings and exposures to produce the best quality photographic image prior to image processing
    • Work with a variety of digital file formats including RAW, DNG, PSD, TIF and JPG, and use the appropriate file formats and resolutions for different photography applications
    • Apply best practices in digital photography workflow from capture to output
    • Describe the importance of photography as both a fine art and design medium
    • Effectively apply photographic lighting techniques and strategies using both natural light and studio lighting equipment
    • Produce portfolio-worthy digital photography projects that demonstrate strong photography techniques and concept development
    • Present and defend design choices for digital photography projects and exercises in a group setting, and effectively and respectfully critique others’ work


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    DSGN 153 Introduction to Web and Mobile Design

    5 credits
    This course teaches the fundamentals of designing websites, mobile content, and graphics for screen-based devices. Topics include navigation, user interaction and user experience, image production and digital color theory, layout techniques, accessibility, contracts and copyright law, and managing project assets. Client relationships, audience identification, and search engine optimization are also explored.

    Prerequisites: DSGN 121  or DSGN 122  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe how the principles of site architecture, navigation, and interaction affect user experience of a device or website
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of interactivity through projects and exercises
    • Describe the significance of search engine optimization when designing websites
    • Optimize images for online use, including correct use of file formats
    • Organize project content from site conception to final
    • Create a detailed site proposal
    • Develop a project in a team setting
    • Respectfully present, defend, and critique design choices in a group setting


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    DSGN 155 Introduction to User-Centered Design

    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to the processes, research, and design decisions used in creating a user-experience based design solution. Focus is exploring best practices of the UX workflow/process and gaining an understanding of the various type of deliverables involved in the UX workflow/process. Students will be introduced to research methods, rapid prototyping, and collaborative design. Emphasis is placed on introducing the concept of user-experience to students.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe user experience
    • Identify the benefits of user experience in relation to the design process
    • Describe the user-experience process, industry-driven techniques, best practices, tools, and deliverables
    • Evaluate and utilize research methods based on design problems and project constraints
    • Create effective solutions to design challenges based on user data


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    DSGN 156 Usability Studies and Research

    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to user research and will focus on user behaviors, needs, and motivations, guided through feedback methodologies. Interviews, surveys, research groups, heuristic reviews, content analysis, usability tests, and other methods will be explored. Selection of appropriate research tools,conducting ethical user research, and transferring the collected data into design requirements will be studied.

    Prerequisites: DSGN 155  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of usability studies and research
    • Analyze and select appropriate research methods for individual and group projects
    • Evaluate data from usability tests to understand user’s needs
    • Apply research driven data and knowledge to design solutions


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DSGN 157 User Interface Design

    4 credits
    This course covers fundamentals of designing interfaces between humans and machines, including kiosks, game tools, household tools, mobile phones, and keyboards. Students will engage in critical dialogue addressing the psychology of human interaction. Concepts including learnability, discoverability, and understandability will be included, and students will create design solutions based on these principles.

    Prerequisites: ART 102  and DSGN 155  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify design problems and challenges in interactive devices, system,s and services
    • Respond to design challenges by applying observation techniques to understand interactions in context
    • Build interactive systems to solve problems using the user-centered design system
    • Develop conceptual models and depictions (scenarios, mock-ups and prototypes) to research prospective users
    • Design effective solutions using a participatory design process
    • Effectively present and defend individual design solutions in terms of user experience and technical design choices


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DSGN 170 Motion Graphics With After Effects

    4 credits
    Students will learn the fundamentals of creating timeline-based graphics and animation using industry-standard motion graphics and animation software.

    Prerequisites: DSGN 122  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Set up and edit layers in motion graphics software
    • Use key frames to perform animations
    • Apply and combine effects to create unique and artistic content
    • Create basic 3D animations, and combine them with other motion graphics
    • Perform automated animation using expressions in After Effects


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    DSGN 191 Portfolio Foundations

    4 credits


    This portfolio preparation course is designed to assist students in preparing for the Portfolio/Job Search class and future industry employment. Students will critically examine current and previous multimedia works with faculty from the program to determine strengths and areas of improvement to focus on for the remainder of the degree.

    Topics and activities will include public speaking practice, research-based assignments, portfolio presentation, revisions, and industry guest speakers. Faculty coaching and recommendations will be provided as to the best steps for success in the design and digital gaming and interactive media industries based on the quality and content of the student work in this course.

    This class should be taken halfway through the AAS-T degree program for Design and for Digital Gaming and Interactive Media.

    Prerequisites: ART 102  and DSGN 122  

    Corequisites: DSGN 216  recommended

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the caliber of portfolio work expected in entry-level portfolios in the student’s chosen area of the multimedia industry
    • Describe current strengths and areas that need improvement in portfolio work
    • Analyze and identify the different types of portfolios used for various industries
    • Demonstrate ability to accept constructive criticism in order to improve portfolio work
    • Demonstrate knowledge of specific areas of career interest within the multimedia field
    • Articulate the importance of refining and customizing the portfolio and other job materials to a specific target audience


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    DSGN 216 Business for Creative Professionals

    4 credits


    This course provides an overview of the decisions and tasks involved in setting up and working in the creative industry. Students will gain an understanding of the pros and cons of entrepreneurship, employment, and business opportunities. The course will address different business structures, licensing, taxes, contracts, proposals, business plans, marketing plans, social media, networking, pro-bono work, and portfolios. Students should take this course in their first year.

    Prerequisites: DSGN 100  

    Students who completed MMDP 101 or DSGN 101 meet the prerequisite.

    Corequisites: DSGN 191  recommended

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the differences between a freelance creative professional, a small partnership, a full-time employee, or a contractor
    • Describe the steps and legal requirements involved with starting a new creative business, as well as the pros and cons of entrepreneurship and different business structures
    • Create and evaluate business contracts, project proposals, and business and marketing plans
    • Identify common business support services such as legal, financial, accounting, and insurance
    • Analyze market trends to identify where opportunities have historically existed, and where new opportunities may be found
    • Leverage social media to create contacts, and pursue the next steps in building a professional industry network 


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    DSGN 233 Web Authoring with Dreamweaver

    4 credits
    Students will learn to create traditional and mobile device-friendly websites with Dreamweaver. Skills in layout and interactivity will be honed as students combine Dreamweaver with contemporary web building tools such as scripts, libraries and plug-ins to produce functional web content across a variety of devices.

    Prerequisites: CSD 112  and DSGN 122  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create and edit responsive web sites for computers and mobile devices using Dreamweaver
    • Demonstrate the ability to add and modify web graphics within the Dreamweaver interface
    • Create and style forms
    • Demonstrate understanding of local and remote site management
    • Utilize industry standard scripts, libraries and plug-ins with Dreamweaver to leverage web design functionality and flexibility across devices


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    DSGN 241 Vector Illustration 2 with Illustrator

    4 credits
    This course covers intermediate and advanced illustration tools and techniques available in Adobe Illustrator. Students will learn skills to produce moderately complex vector-based artwork for web, multimedia, and print graphics. Interoperability with other industry standard graphic software will be examined.

    Prerequisites: DSGN 121  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify multiple visual solutions to client illustration needs
    • Create artwork in various styles using Illustrator tools
    • Show mastery of the pen tool
    • Demonstrate best practices such as managing colors and layers, minimizing file size, converting raster to vector
    • Correctly prepare artwork for multiple forms of distribution (print, web, digital devices)
    • Combine Illustrator artwork with other graphics applications


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    DSGN 242 Image Editing 2 with Photoshop

    4 credits
    This course covers intermediate to advanced application of Photoshop skills, including photo retouching, seamless compositing, layer and channel manipulation, and image size/resolution optimization.

    Prerequisites: DSGN 122  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Correct a photo efficiently to fix flaws, remove color casts and apply sharpening
    • Describe the difference between global and local image editing
    • Demonstrate effective use of channels to create and manipulate colors, effects, selections, and masks
    • Use a nondestructive workflow in raster image editing projects by use of Adjustment Layers, Smart Objects, Masks, Filters, Blending Modes, and Effects
    • Combine several images into a seamless composite using appropriate tools
    • Use a scanner as part of a project workflow, and effectively adjust scanner settings for different types of scanned images
    • Demonstrate best practices for image resolution and optimization for web, screen, and print
    • Create and apply textures, patterns, and painterly effects using a variety of Photoshop tools
    • Use Photoshop export/optimization functions in a web design workflow
    • Create effective solutions to design problems using the elements and principles of design
    • Respectfully present, defend, and critique design choices in a group setting


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    DSGN 246 Digital Publishing and Complex Layouts

    4 credits


    This course covers intermediate to advanced page-layout design and interactive digital publishing techniques using Adobe InDesign and other industry standard software. Students will refine design and production skills specific to publishing for print, tablet, or screen. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of layout formats and deliverables suitable for print and electronic publishing formats.

    Prerequisites: DSGN 126  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
     

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate mastery of tools, panels, interactive features, and color workflows
    • Expertly use typography in print and screen-based publications
    • Produce high-quality graphics in a variety of page-layout settings
    • Demonstrate appropriate use of filters, blend modes, and effects for a given task
    • Create effective solutions to design challenges using the elements and principles of design including the use of grids, the golden rectangle, and other compositional strategies
    • Deliver appropriate file formats for commercially printed and digital interactive materials
    • Produce a range of different types of interactive tablet publications using InDesign panels and features
    • Create and apply character, paragraph, and other styles effectively through projects and exercises
    • Respectfully present, defend, and critique design choices in a group setting


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    DSGN 248 Professional Design Workflow

    4 credits
    In this course students will be guided through best practices in a professional design workflow as they focus on a quarter-long, multifaceted project. Students will analyze and leverage appropriate tools and techniques of various graphic and layout programs to achieve optimal results for the project deliverables. Market research, sketching, process work, and presentation skills will be examined as components to a successful design workflow. Interoperability of graphic programs such as Photoshop and Illustrator, and how these programs feed into larger layout projects, will be examined in the class.

    Prerequisites: DSGN 126 DSGN 241 , and DSGN 242  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Conceptualize, build, and present a multifaceted design project using Illustrator, Photoshop, and a variety of industry-standard layout tools and programs
    • Describe the importance of market research, concept sketches, and documentation of process work in the professional design workflow
    • Demonstrate a solid understanding of interoperability between industry standard graphic software programs, including best practices in managing colors and layers, minimizing file size, converting raster to vector, and incorporating graphics into greater layout projects
    • Demonstrate knowledge of basic elements and principles of design by identifying and integrating these visual strategies into a range of simple to complex project pieces
    • Provide a client with efficient design solutions while dealing with deadlines and budget constraints
    • Professionally present and critique design choices in a group setting


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    DSGN 258 Prepress

    4 credits
    An introduction to the processes used to produce digital publications and high-quality commercially printed documents. Focus is on developing best practices in project workflow and an understanding of final deliverables suitable for tablet publications or commercial printing. Students should take this course near the end of their studies.

    Prerequisites: DSGN 126  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe workflows and file preparation processes for ePublications, interactive documents, and commercially printed documents
    • Assess appropriate use of color (CMYK, RGB, or spot) for various types of digital publishing jobs, including cost factors
    • Differentiate how font selection, color modes, and graphic files are handled when working in print or screen workflows
    • Preflight and package print files correctly with necessary fonts, graphics, and separation capabilities
    • Respectfully present, defend, and critique design choices in a group setting


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    DSGN 268 Introduction to Content Management Systems

    4 credits
    This course introduces students to common Content Management System (CMS) platforms. Topics include how to develop CMS-based websites; install, modify, and create new templates; add and edit content; and use modules and plug-ins.

    Prerequisites: DSGN 233  and CSD 112  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Select an appropriate CMS system given specific criteria
    • Install, develop, and maintain a CMS based website
    • Install, create, and modify templates to be used on CMS based websites
    • Install  modules and plug-ins on web hosting servers
    • Use critical thinking and CMS best practices to meet industry standards related to cross browser compatibility and web accessibility
    • Describe file hierarchy and workflow best practices in a CMS environment
    • Use Adobe Dreamweaver CMS integration features


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    DSGN 282 Brand Communication and Marketing

    5 credits
    This course provides a survey of the field of brand communication design and marketing from historical, cultural, and industry practice perspectives. Students will study the principles of brand communication and contemporary marketing theory.

    Prerequisites: ART 102  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the basic process of brand development and value alignment
    • Apply contemporary marketing principles
    • Identify effective marketing and communication strategies for a business
    • Describe the historical relevance and evolution of marketing communication
    • Produce a graphic identity project


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    DSGN 285 Introduction to Environmental Graphic Design

    5 credits
    This course provides a survey of the field of environmental graphic design from historical, cultural, and industry practice perspectives. Students will study the principles and practices of way finding, entertainment retail, exhibit design, and infographics.

    Prerequisites: ART 102  and DSGN 117  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the basic components of way finding and signage systems
    • Demonstrate familiarity with contemporary exhibit design and entertainment retail principles and practices
    • Describe the implications of technology and global influence on interactive communication and the visualization of information
    • Describe the historical relevance and evolution of entertainment retail
    • Produce a comprehensive way finding or exhibit design project


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    DSGN 290 Portfolio/Job Search

    5 credits


    This course covers the elements of portfolio preparation and the job search process for employment in the multimedia field. Best practices for portfolio creation and delivery will be examined, including critical decision-making about which pieces to include based on target audiences or desired careers.

    Prerequisites: ART 102 , DSGN 122 , and DSGN 191 

    Students who completed MMDP 122 and MMDP 191 meet the prerequisite.

    Corequisites: DSGN 296  

    Students should enroll in DSGN 290 in their last quarter of the Design or Digital Gaming and Interactive Media programs.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create a variety of quality portfolio projects within their chosen fields of specialty
    • Present themselves to a potential employer in a confident, professional manner
    • Critically examine prior work to determine how to improve it
    • Deliver a portfolio in multiple digital formats
    • Identify job opportunities in their chosen area
    • Customize resumes and cover letters to specific opportunities or target audiences
    • Showcase design skills via portfolio presentation


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
  •  

    DSGN 296 Capstone Team Project

    4 credits
    Students in this course will work as a team to develop and complete a multidisciplinary portfolio project. Under the guidance of a multimedia faculty instructor, students collaboratively set and implement learning objectives, timelines, in-progress critique methods, and deliverable goals. The team project will consider and document all steps in the design process from research and concept to final deliverables and presentation, showcasing the abilities of a student to successfully work as part of a team to produce a relevant industry project.

    Prerequisites: One of the following: DSGN 241 , DSGN 242 , DSGN 246 , DSGN 268 , GAME 182 , GAME 215 , or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Self-assess strengths and weaknesses in working with a team, such as interpersonal skills, communication skills, and roles within an organizational structure
    • Clarify personal strengths in style, technique and conceptual development
    • Self-assess for skill gaps in technical abilities
    • Utilize constructive criticism as an opportunity to improve project work or skills
    • Demonstrate proficiency in working across software applications and technologies as necessary to meet an end project goal
    • Employ creative and critical thinking to enhance problem solving
    • Produce a comprehensive and portfolio-ready project including discovery, concept development, iteration and design, and final deliverable
    • Accurately describe personal contributions to a team project


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    DSGN 297 Multimedia Internship

    1-4 credits


    Multimedia internship designed to expand student learning in the workplace. Students work with a faculty member and internship site supervisor to formalize the academic component of the experience through development of learning objectives, professional resume, timesheets, work samples and written reviews.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
     

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply techniques, concepts and best practices from the classroom to real-world circumstances
    • Clarify personal career goals, and identify skills that need improving to achieve these goals
    • Self-assess strengths and weaknesses in workplace competencies, such as interpersonal skills, communication skills, and roles within an organizational structure
    • Self-assess for skill gaps in technical abilities as they apply in the workplace
    • Use constructive criticism as an opportunity to improve technical and conceptual abilities in a work environment


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 90


Diesel and Heavy Equipment Technician

  
  •  

    DHET 122 Welding Applications

    4 credits
    A study of welding procedures with a focus on developing skills needed for fabrication and repair of heavy equipment and trucks.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125 .

    Corequisites: DHET 123 , DHET 124 , DHET 125 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while welding
    • Fabricate accessory devices for heavy equipment
    • Repair accessory devices for heavy equipment
    • Cut, grind, bend, weld as needed for heavy equipment repair


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    DHET 123 Heavy Duty Electrical Systems

    4 credits
    The study of heavy duty electrical systems and sub-systems with a focus on design, repair, inspection, removal and installation. Hands-on troubleshooting and test equipment usage.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125 .

    Corequisites: DHET 122 , DHET 124 , DHET 125 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow safety practices involving heavy duty electrical systems
    • Diagnose, test, and repair starting systems
    • Diagnose, test, and repair lighting systems
    • Diagnose, test, and repair accessory systems


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    DHET 124 Electronic Applications

    4 credits
    The study of electronic systems and sub-systems used with a focus on design, repair, inspection, removal and installation. Hands-on troubleshooting and test equipment usage. This course teaches to the global outcome of communication.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125 .

    Corequisites: DHET 122 , DHET 123 , DHET 125 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while working on electronic systems
    • Troubleshoot electronic components used in Heavy Duty systems
    • Use test equipment to determine needed electronic  system repairs
    • Locate, remove and replace jor repair major electronic components as per OEM standards
    • Effectively repair or replace wiring harness components connecting electronic subsystems
    • Interpret  and explain the meaning of symbols used in  electronic system schematics to co-workers


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    DHET 125 Basic Maintenance

    3 credits
    The study of maintenance requirements and recommended procedures related to heavy equipment and trucks. Hands-on guided practice on customer equipment and program training aids.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safety practices while performing basic maintenance tasks
    • Perform preventative maintenance tasks using industry provided schedules
    • Locate specifications and capacities using OEM data sheets and electronic online sources
    • Successfully complete a proficiency exam that meets industry standards


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    DHET 131 Engine Principles/Components

    3 credits
    The study of internal combustion engine operating principles for both two cycle and four cycle application. Includes major component identification and function as well as OEM terminology.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while working on engines
    • Explain internal combustion engine operating principles
    • Identify an engines major components and describe the function of each
    • Describe the difference between two cycle and four cycle engine operation
    • Successfully complete a proficiency exam that meets industry standards


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
 

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