Catalog 2017-2018 
    
    Mar 03, 2021  
Catalog 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Environmental Horticulture

  
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    HORT 111 Botany

    5 credits
    This course introduces how plants grow, how they are structured internally, and how their parts function. Emphasis is placed on the application of plant growth principles to our environment and plant diversity.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • List the components of a cell and its role
    • Describe how plant tissues and systems function
    • Apply the processes of photosynthesis and respiration
    • Chart the movement of water and nutrients throughout the plant
    • Identify above and below ground plant anatomy
    • Analyze plant responses to environmental stimuli 


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    HORT 112 Intro to Hand Tools

    1 credits
    Provides an overview of horticulture hand tools and equipment, focusing on identification and practical uses. Construction, care and safety are discussed.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify by name frequently used hand tools
    • Explain basic construction of quality hand tools
    • Explain safety procedures common to use of hand tools
    • Select various tools for selected jobs common to horticulture trades
    • Design and create a brochure about common hand tools


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10
  
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    HORT 113 Propagation

    5 credits
    Provides an introduction to sexual and asexual methods of reproducing plants. Students apply principles taught in class during laboratory.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Comprehend and demonstrate seed propagation from germination through transplant
    • Identify environmental conditions essential to seed germination and asexual propagation
    • Identify conditions associated with and control of diseases
    • Take different types of cuttings
    • Diagram the life cycle of a fern
    • Successfully layer plants
    • Explain plant patent laws
    • Work in teams to effectively determine the best propagation techniques and timing for specific plants


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    HORT 115 Plant ID Fall

    4 credits
    Consists of the identification of deciduous and evergreen trees, shrubs, vines and ground covers used in landscapes throughout the Pacific Northwest. Perennials are also covered. Key identification characteristics, culture, and landscape usage is emphasized.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will:

    • Identify plants common to Pacific Northwest landscapes
    • Name blooming time (within two months) and color for each plant
    • Describe the unique characteristics and points of interest of each plant studied
    • Given the situation, select proper landscape usage of plants
    • Note specific plant tendencies towards disease, insects, or their problems
    • Know how to prune plants to enhance natural habitat
    • Find and evaluate different online and print resources available to identify plants and information about their culture and use


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    HORT 116 Fall Horticulture Lab

    3 credits
    Provides hands-on application of principles and concepts taught in class. The focus is on practices commonly used in the horticulture industry in landscape management and greenhouse operations.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will:

    • Transplant, pinch, and propagate live material
    • Develop and implement strategies for landscape management, including weed management, soil management, and integrated pest management leading to strong plant health
    • Practice plant propagation and nursery production techniques, including greenhouse and nursery plant care, effective greenhouse operations, and effective cropping practices
    • Work effectively in small groups to achieve a common goal by communicating and coordinating tasks effectively


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    HORT 120 Landscape Design Using a CAD Program

    3 credits
    This class provides in-depth study and hands-on experience essential to landscape design graphics using the DynaSCAPE design program. Students will gain exposure to CAD based estimating techniques, databases, and plant selection programs.

    Prerequisites: Working knowledge of landscape plant material, drafting and design fundamentals, and basic computer skills.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create computer generated landscape plans, details, and diagrams that reflect landscape horticulture design concepts and solutions
    • Effectively communicate the details of a computer generated landscape plan


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    HORT 121 Soils

    4 credits
    Explores the physical and chemical properties of soil that affect a plant’s ability to survive, grow and thrive. Course surveys soil water and the roles of nutrients in maintaining healthy plant growth.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • List the important factors in soil formation
    • Distinguish between different soil physical properties and apply that knowledge to landscapes
    • Explain the principles of soil interface
    • Explain the chemical properties of soil
    • Explain the role of organic matter in soil science
    • Identify the elements essential for plant growth and their function
    • Recognize the signs of nutrient deficiency
    • Discuss fertilizers and their methods of application


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    HORT 122 Pruning

    2 credits
    Includes the most current theories and techniques of proper pruning. Students learn how pruning a plant affects its growth processes, flowering, fruiting, rejuvenation, and aesthetics. The focus is on plants of western Washington.

    Corequisites: HORT 127 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use the knowledge of plant anatomy and physiology to correctly prune
    • Apply current theories and techniques of proper pruning
    • Properly prune various trees (evergreen and deciduous), shrubs and ground covers
    • Explain the effect of various pruning techniques on different plants
    • Safely use and maintain various tools
    • Communicate multiple, complex pruning techniques both orally and in writing


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    HORT 123 Integrated Pest Management

    4 credits
    Develop an integrated pest management strategy for the nursery and landscape including the usage of cultural, biological, and chemical control options. This includes a survey of the biology of pests. This class focuses on the principles of plant health care using the landscape as an ecosystem.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use terminology associated with integrated pest management
    • Explain different insects and their life cycles
    • Chart pesticide groups, present and emerging
    • Explain pesticide formulations, toxicity, safety, and recordkeeping
    • Explain the principles of integrated pest management and plant healthcare
    • List common plant diseases, their mode of action, and control option
    • Diagnose and evaluate treatment strategies for typical landscape plants


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    HORT 125 Plant ID Winter

    4 credits
    Plant ID Winter/ HORT 125 consists of the identification of deciduous and evergreen trees, shrubs, vines and ground covers used in landscapes throughout the Pacific Northwest. Perennials are also covered. Key identification characteristics, culture, and landscape usage is emphasized.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify plants common to Pacific Northwest landscapes
    • Name blooming time (within two months) and color for each plant
    • Describe the unique characteristics and points of interest of each plant studied
    • Given the situation, select proper landscape usage of plants
    • Note specific plant tendencies towards disease, insects, or their problems
    • Prune plants to enhance natural habitat
    • Find and evaluate different online and print resources available to identify plants and information about their culture and use


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    HORT 127 Winter Horticulture Lab

    3 credits


    Winter Horticulture Lab/HORT 127 provides hands-on application of principles and concepts taught in class. The focus is on practices commonly used in the horticulture industry in landscape management and greenhouse operations.

    Corequisites: HORT 121 , HORT 122 , HORT 123 , HORT 125 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will:

    • Transplant, pinch, and propagate live material
    • Develop and implement strategies for landscape management, including weed management, soil management, and integrated pest management leading to strong plant health
    • Practice plant propagation and nursery production techniques, including greenhouse and nursery plant care, effective greenhouse operations, and effective cropping practices
    • Work effectively in small groups to achieve a common goal by communicating and coordinating tasks effectively


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    HORT 131 Landscape Design and Drafting

    6 credits
    Provides an overview of landscape design principles and design elements applied to practical situations. Students are provided with an understanding of the role of good design as applied to an actual residential landscape client.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Complete a site analysis on an actual property
    • Assess client design goals
    • Develop a goal statement synthesizing site analysis and client survey
    • Complete a design using aesthetic and functional values
    • Develop a working ongoing relationship with a client
    • Complete a professional, hand drawn, to-scale draft of a residential landscape


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 50 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    HORT 132 Survey of Landscape Materials

    2 credits
    Introduces students to the types and uses of hard goods in the creation of a successful landscape. Field trips will be a major component of this course as we meet professionals who use and create these hard goods.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify suppliers of different types of hard goods
    • List the advantages and disadvantages of using various landscape materials
    • Network with professionals in the landscape supply trade
    • Identify current trends in the landscape industry
    • Evaluate the use of different materials used in a landscape
    • Effectively identify and evaluate possible materials for use in specific hardscape application


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    HORT 134 Nursery Retailing

    1 credits
    Covers a wide range of business skills including costing and quality control. Topics include creating quality products, researching and finding niche markets, and producing a major retail event.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Practice quality control of a wide range of plants
    • Set up displays in a variety of areas for public sales
    • Determine price by identifying cost of producing crops
    • Research and produce accurate cultural information for specific crops
    • Effectively interact as a team member in a high volume retail situation


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    HORT 135 Plant ID Spring

    4 credits
    Consists of the identification of deciduous and evergreen trees, shrubs, vines and ground covers used in landscapes throughout the Pacific Northwest. Perennials are also covered. Key identification characteristics, culture, and landscape usage is emphasized.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will:

    • Identify plants common to Pacific Northwest landscapes
    • Name blooming time (within two months) and color for each plant
    • Describe the unique characteristics and points of interest of each plant studied
    • Given the situation, select proper landscape usage of plants
    • Note specific plant tendencies towards disease, insects, or their problems
    • Know how to prune plants to enhance natural habitat
    • Find and evaluate different online and print resources available to identify plants and information about their culture and use


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    HORT 137 Spring Horticulture Lab

    4 credits


    SPRING HORTICULTURE LAB / HORT 137 provides hands-on application of principles and concepts taught in class. The focus is on practices commonly used in the horticulture industry in landscape management and greenhouse operations.

    Corequisites: HORT 131 , HORT 132 , HORT 134 , HORT 135 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will:

    • Transplant, pinch, and propagate live material
    • Develop and implement strategies for landscape management, including weed management, soil management, and integrated pest management leading to strong plant health
    • Practice plant propagation and nursery production techniques, including greenhouse and nursery plant care, effective greenhouse operations, and effective cropping practices
    • Develop drafting skills essential to a landscape design plan
    • Work effectively in small groups to achieve a common goal by communicating and coordinating tasks effectively

     

    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60

  
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    HORT 138 Topics in Arboriculture

    3 credits
    Students will gain an understanding of topics and issues essential to working with trees in urban landscapes. Some topics covered include tree biology, nutrition, pruning, plant health care, and soils. The ISA Arborists Certification Study Guide will be the text. This class would be helpful for anyone taking the ISA exams. ISA continuing education credits available, CPH credit available.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Understand the basic concepts of tree biology and relate these concepts to tree management practices
    • Identify common landscape trees
    • Understand the effects of soil biology, soil chemistry, soil texture and structure, and soil management practices on the growth and health of trees
    • Understand water management practices used to enhance tree growth
    • Understand the science of tree nutrition and current fertilization practices
    • Use a systematic approach to select proper tree species/varieties for a given situation
    • Understand current techniques and procedures for installing and establishing trees
    • Understand and demonstrate current pruning concepts and practices
    • Understand current concepts and practices for cabling and bracing trees
    • Use a systematic approach to diagnosing common tree maladies and use reference materials to locate problem management strategies
    • Understand the various ways that trees can be weakened and injured by construction activities and how to preserve trees on construction sites
    • Understand basic tree climbing techniques and become familiar with basic tree climbing equipment
    • Become familiar with industry safety standards for tree care operations


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    HORT 211 Intro to Bidding and Estimating

    1 credits
    A continuation of HORT 131 Landscape Design and Drafting , this class teaches the basics of bidding and estimating a landscape design project. Concepts such as fixed cost, material markup and profit margin will be discussed, culminating in a landscape design bid package.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Develop a working, ongoing relationship with a client
    • Develop a cost estimate for installing a landscape design
    • Create phenology charts for landscape plans
    • Make final presentation to client
    • Compile resources to create a booklet containing supplemental data, costing and phenology charts for the landscape plan


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    HORT 212 Sustainable Lawn Care

    3 credits
    Covers the identification, care, and maintenance of cool season turfgrasses. Topics include soil preparation, nutrition, thatch, pest management, installation, and renovation. Special attention is given to weeds.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify four common grasses of Western Washington
    • Discuss soil preparation for installing a lawn
    • Explain the role of thatch and its relation to insects and disease
    • Identify sustainable practices used in the landscape
    • Describe mowing heights and its effect on turfgrass
    • Explain the role of nutrition in turfgrass health
    • Identify weeds common to Western Washington
    • Describe sustainable watering strategies for healthy turf
    • Describe insects and diseases common to turf grass in Western Washington
    • Research and identify weeds and present management options


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    HORT 215 Plant ID Summer

    4 credits
    Consists of the identification of deciduous and evergreen trees, shrubs, vines and ground covers used in landscapes throughout the Pacific Northwest. Perennials are also covered. Key identification characteristics, culture, and landscape usage is emphasized.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify plants common to Pacific Northwest landscapes
    • Name blooming time (within two months) and color for each plant
    • State uniqueness and points of interest
    • Given the situation, select proper landscape usage of plants
    • Note specific plant tendencies towards disease, insects, or their problems
    • Prune plants to enhance natural habitat


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    HORT 216 Introduction to Greenhouses

    3 credits
    Surveys the components of commercial greenhouses and growing structures. Efficient use of environmental controls and cropping will be discussed. Students will be exposed to several local commercial greenhouse operations through fieldtrips.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Analyze sites for greenhouse feasibility
    • Explain environmental controls used in a greenhouse
    • List and explain different structural options for a greenhouse
    • Explain the uses and practical applications of specialized greenhouse options
    • Discuss the use of specialized equipment in greenhouses today
    • Using a crop as the guide, make recommendations for selecting greenhouse types and options


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    HORT 217 Summer Horticulture Lab

    3 credits
    Provides hands-on application of principles and concepts taught in class. The summer work experience will be included in this class.

    Corequisites: HORT 211 , HORT 212 , HORT 225 , HORT 215 , HORT 216 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Transplant, pinch, and propagate live material
    • Develop and implement strategies for landscape management, including weed management, soil management, and integrated pest management leading to strong plant health
    • Practice plant propagation and nursery production techniques, including greenhouse and nursery plant care, effective greenhouse operations, and effective cropping practices
    • Work effectively in small groups to achieve a common goal by communicating and coordinating tasks effectively


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    HORT 225 Career Exploration

    3 credits
    Provides an introduction to the breadth of employment opportunities in the horticulture industry and the job search skills needed to successfully secure employment.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify career paths and options within the horticulture industry
    • Develop interviewing techniques and a list of questions to use in an informational interview
    • Interview an employer to gather information about a chosen career path
    • Produce a successful horticulture-specific resume or portfolio
    • Write a cover letter, work experience summaries, and thank you notes
    • Participate in industry work experiences


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

Human Resources

  
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    BUHR 210 HR’s Role in Organization & Program Overview

    1 credits
    This course explores the field of human resources (HR) and its role in organizations. An overview of the Lake Washington Institute of Technology HR programs is also covered.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the evolution of the HR field in the U.S. within the last 100 years up to its current role in modern capitalist societies
    • Explain HR’s role in developing human capital and its impact on an organization’s success
    • Recognize the partnership of managers and HR professionals
    • Describe the job(s) of an HR professional and the knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) required
    • Describe the major functional areas of HR
    • Determine if HR  is a career path they want to pursue
    • List the various HR certifications and what is required to achieve them
    • Describe the requirements for the LWTC HR programs


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10
  
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    BUHR 215 HR Ethics and Diversity

    4 credits
    This course covers the importance of ethics in human resources (HR) and an organization’s social responsibility. The role of diversity in HR and how a diverse workforce can drive business results are also covered.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the impact of ethics in HR and organizations
    • Identify and resolve HR-related ethical issues with employees and organizations in positive ways
    • Identify ethical issues and apply criteria to make correct decisions and avoid unethical behaviors
    • Make decisions that reflect a standard of professional behavior and values in dealing with others within an organizational setting
    • Create an inclusive work environment that fosters diversity in the workplace
    • Successfully recognize cultural differences that may affect behavior in the workplace
    • Develop successful workforce diversity strategies to enhance organizational talent and drive business results


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    BUHR 220 Employee Benefits and Risk Management

    4 credits
    This course covers the strategic considerations that should guide the design of benefit programs and the cost implications and strategies to control them. Also covered in this course are risk management and measures that create a safe and secure work environment.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define benefits and identify strategic benefit design considerations
    • Define and distinguish between mandated and voluntary benefits                                
    • Explain current trends in benefits, including employee assistance program (EAP), healthy workplace, retirement, and pension programs
    • Coordinate mandated and voluntary time-off benefits
    • Describe the major societal trends in benefits and workplace safety
    • Identify the federal and state laws and basic provisions relating to risk management:  occupational health, safety, and security
    • Explain measures that create a safe and secure work environment
    • Explain the importance of strategically managing both benefit and safety costs 


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    BUHR 230 Staffing: Recruitment, Selection, & Placement

    4 credits
    This course covers employment decisions concerning building a staff and maintaining a talented workforce. Various methods of locating qualified job candidates and assessment methods for identifying a candidate’s suitability for employment are covered.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe an effective staffing plan for an organization
    • Explain successful strategies for developing a diverse talent pool of qualified candidates 
    • Identify different candidate sourcing options
    • Identify techniques to successfully select the best candidate
    • Compare and contrast the value of different assessment methods for identifying a candidate’s suitability for employment
    • Describe the various factors that must be taken into account in designing a job, including job analysis and job descriptions
    • Explain the importance of familiarizing new employees with the organization and their jobs and work units
    • Describe the relationship of employee orientation to productivity, motivation, and success
    • Explain the implications associated with employment laws related to recruitment and selection


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    BUHR 235 Total Rewards (compensation)

    4 credits
    This course reviews the total rewards of organizations by exploring their total compensation strategies. Methods to properly pay employees in a cost-effective, competitive, equitable, and legal manner are also addressed.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the components of total compensation
    • Describe the objectives, principles, regulations, and terminology of compensation programs
    • Explain compensation philosophy, strategy, and current practices, including base pay, variable pay, and incentive pay
    • Identify the major provisions of the federal and state laws affecting compensation
    • Define the issues of equal pay for comparable work, pay compression, living wage laws, and executive pay
    • Analyze the extent of linkages between pay, employee performance, and organizational objectives


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    BUHR 240 Employee and Labor Relations

    3 credits
    This course examines how employee relations can create a positive organizational culture. Students also explore facets of the labor relations process: collective representation, union organization, bargaining, and negotiations.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the nature of management/employee relations and human resource’s role in that relationship
    • Distinguish between approaches to disciplinary actions and the various types of alternative dispute resolution procedures in a union or non-union setting
    • Identify the principal state and federal laws that provide the framework for employee and labor relations
    • Describe facets of the labor relations processes such as collective representation, union organization, bargaining, and negotiations
    • Explain how employee relations can create a positive organizational culture
    • Respond appropriately to information about employee and labor relations conveyed in verbal, non-verbal, written, and symbolic ways 


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    BUHR 245 Training, Workforce Planning, Perf & Talent Mgmt

    4 credits
    This course covers the principles of learning and how to facilitate training to link training objectives to organizational goals. Students also learn how to build an effective performance management program by understanding the advantages of integrating human resource (HR) and strategic planning.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define training, facilitation, and development in the context of organizations
    • Identify the principles of learning and describe how they facilitate training
    • Explain the components of training-needs assessment
    • Link training objectives to organizational goals
    • Explain the advantages and disadvantages of evaluation criteria
    • Explain the purpose, characteristics, methods, and communication techniques of an effective performance management program
    • Develop a clear line of sight between performance management and organizational goals
    • Identify the basic approaches to human resource planning and how they are related to corporate strategy
    • Describe important elements and stages of career development
    • Explain the advantages of integrating human resource planning and strategic planning
    • Work cooperatively in a team to create a successful training presentation


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    BUHR 250 HR Information Systems and Measuring HR Outcomes

    4 credits
    This course covers how to leverage technology in today’s environment to support human resource (HR) activities. Measurement strategies that link HR practices to achieving bottom-line business results are also covered.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the management of human resource information systems (HRIS) and how they can streamline transactional HR activities to allow HR professionals to focus on strategic activities
    • Navigate the basics of an HRIS program
    • Identify the criteria/issues in selecting and implementing an HRIS program
    • Leverage technology tools and the Internet to HR’s advantage
    • Explain how technology can provide decision support mechanisms that allow HR to make short- and long-term decisions
    • Define the importance of  measuring HR outcomes using metrics and the bottom line
    • Define and communicate appropriate measurement strategies that support organizational objectives
    • Effectively manage and retain  employee information
    • Identity an appropriate HRIS to gather, store, and analyze information


    Total Hours: 80 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    BUHR 255 Employment Law I

    4 credits
    This course covers employment laws and their effects on the first half of the employment life cycle. The creation and management of a diverse workforce are also included.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the effects of employment laws on human resource (HR )and organizations
    • Explain the concepts of employee rights and employer responsibilities
    • Explain HR’s role in risk management and compliance
    • Explain the U.S. court system as it relates to employment law
    • Explain the concepts of employment at will, equal employment, affirmative action, disparate treatment, adverse impact, and retaliation
    • Explain how to reasonably accommodate and address work-life conflicts
    • Explain the concept of creating a diverse workplace to enhance employee perceptions of fairness and equity throughout the organization
    • Describe the differences between state and federal employment laws
    • Analyze and draw conclusions about employment law cases


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    BUHR 260 Employment Law II

    4 credits
    This course covers employment laws and their effects on the second half of the employment life cycle, including benefits, compensation, performance, terms and conditions of employment, and termination.

    Prerequisites: BUHR 255  recommended (Note: Changed from required to recommended on 01/03/2018)

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the implications of employment laws on compensation, benefits, occupational safety and health, and conditions of employment
    • Explain best practices for managing performance and termination of employees
    • Identify the legal issues associated with downsizing and its effects on employees and the organization
    • Identify union and collective bargaining issues and prepare for compliance with employment laws
    • Effectively investigate and resolve internal complaints
    • Identify resources to keep up-to-date with changing legal requirements
    • Describe the differences between state and federal employment laws
    • Analyze and draw conclusions about employment law cases


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    BUHR 270 Global HR & Mergers & Acquisitions

    4 credits
    This course covers legal, political, cultural, and economic factors that affect global human resource (HR) management. HR’s crucial role in mergers and acquisitions is also included.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe HR management practices as a cultural variable
    • Describe the impact of a country’s culture on workforce practices and expectations
    • Find and apply  best global strategic HR practices across all HR disciplines
    • Effectively manage human capital across borders
    • Effectively assess the best business plan of action in the context of the culture in which the individual is working
    • Explain HR practices that support the success of corporate mergers and acquisitions


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    BUHR 275 Strategic HR Mgmt & Organizational Strategy

    4 credits
    This course covers business strategies and human resource (HR) best practices and their application to all HR disciplines. Effective human capital strategies and practices that give business a sustainable competitive advantage are emphasized. This is the capstone course for the HR Generalist Program and should be taken the student’s last quarter.

    Prerequisites: BUHR 260 , or Professional in Human Resources (PHR) or Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) with instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain how organizational strategies and culture contribute and are linked to HR management
    • Recognize organizational norms, values, and standards of the organization when making decisions that influence people and processes to achieve organizational goals
    • Examine issues surrounding HR outsourcing and management of outside consultants to better deliver HR services
    • Solve complex HR problems and issues involving the integration of one or more functional areas
    • Describe how strategic planning, budgeting, corporate social responsibility, corporate governance and ethics impact HR and the business


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40

Humanities

  
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    HUM 110 Introduction to Film

    5 credits
    This course educates the student to analyze and comprehend film as a storytelling medium and appreciate its value as literary and cinematic art. Approaches may include examination of cinematic technique, genre, historic context, narrative structure, archetypal sources, and/or other perspectives that enlighten the viewer and enhance insight on the medium.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the historical development of the medium
    • Relate films to their cultural heritage and historic context
    • Analyze and express a comprehension of how aesthetic elements, including mise-en-scene, genre, narrative structure, directing, editing, and cinematography, etc., contribute to creating film meaning
    • Write thought-provoking critical analyses about films using accurate and appropriate vocabulary of cinematic terms and acknowledging recognized approaches to film study


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    HUM 215 Diversity and Social Justice in America

    5 credits
    This course will engage students in an extended analysis of diversity and social justice in the United States with the aim of exploring current realities of race and social class and their relationship to power and privilege. Students will develop and strengthen awareness and understanding of how power, privilege, and inequity are reinforced and challenged at individual, institutional, and systemic levels.

    Prerequisites: ENGL& 101  (pre or corequisite).

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define and apply key terms and concepts of diversity and social justice
    • Discuss and analyze how categories of difference are created, maintained, and experienced through power, privilege, and inequity
    • Communicate one’s own intersecting identities of difference and how they position oneself in relation to power, privilege, and inequity
    • Identify how power, privilege, and inequity are reinforced and challenged at individual, institutional, and systemic levels
    • Engage in intentional communication with awareness of intent and impact
    • Recognize stereotypes in self and others and their relationship to micro aggressions
    • Explain different types of knowledge and how knowledge construction maintains power, privilege, and inequity
    • Identify specific ways of becoming an ally in order to disrupt power, privilege, and inequity


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

International

  
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    INTL 040 International Student Success

    2 credits
    New and returning international students will learn the necessary skills to be successful in an American academic environment. Course topics include maintaining immigration status, campus resources, academic success strategies, and cross-cultural understanding.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain how to use the Canvas platform
    • List campus resources and support services
    • Explain college academic policies
    • Communicate and collaborate with peers in an academic setting
    • Explain cultural communication specific to the US
    • Explain academic integrity and plagiarism
    • Identify and use credible research databases
    • Navigate health insurance website
    • Locate local resources (hospitals, libraries, banks, police station, etc)
    • Explain different employment options for international students
    • Explain how to maintain student visa status


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    INTL 059 Beginning Grammar

    4 credits
    This course, for non-native speakers of English who are international students, is designed to improve written and spoken English grammar at the beginner level. This course focuses on developing basic academic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: INTL 077 , INTL 078  or INTL 084 , INT079.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Write clear simple and complex sentences in English, showing some control of basic grammar with 75% accuracy
    • Identify and use the simple present, simple past, and future tenses
    • Identify and use subject-verb agreement with simple and compound subjects
    • Identify and use articles, prepositions, adjectives, and personal pronouns
    • Identify and use count nouns, non-count nouns, and quantifiers
    • Identify and use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions
    • Form and respond to questions
    • Utilize appropriate sentence punctuation 


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    INTL 061 Basic Academic Reading & Writing - A

    6 credits
    This course is for non-native speakers of English who are international students and emphasizes basic reading and writing skills for students with minimal previous English language studies. This course introduces students to the critical thinking process while fostering reading and writing skills.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on the IEP Placement test.

    Corequisites: INTL 060.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to, in English:

    • Analyze simple texts for main ideas and details
    • Use context clues to infer meaning of vocabulary
    • Express opinions and support them
    • Interpret graphs, pictures and illustrations
    • Infer information not explicit in texts
    • Brainstorm ideas for writing
    • Organize information in rudimentary outlines
    • Write short, simple narrative paragraphs on familiar topics with main ideas and supporting details 


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 60
  
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    INTL 074 Beginning Academic Listening & Speaking

    5 credits
    This course, for non-native speakers of English who are international students, builds on and reinforces the skills taught in INTL 062. Students practice simple listening and speaking skills necessary for the academic English classroom. Students work on inferring, evaluating, analyzing, and interpreting skills through a variety of activities.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test, or INTL 062, or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: INTL 075 .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to, in English:

    • Use context clues to infer the meanings of words in a simple context
    • Identify and share opinions using learned expressions
    • Relate listening excerpts on familiar topics to personal experiences
    • Organize and synthesize information from beginner -level listening excerpts
    • Negotiate with others to reach consensus on simple, familiar topics
    • Discuss costs and benefits and make suggestions using simple language
    • Prepare and give short and simple presentations


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 60
  
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    INTL 075 Beginning Academic Reading & Writing

    5 credits
    This course is for non-native speakers of English who are international students and emphasizes academic reading skills, including comparing and contrasting, hypothesizing, and evaluating information and texts at a basic level. Students review the basic academic paragraph structure and write simple explanatory and descriptive paragraphs.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test, or INTL 065, or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: INTL 074 .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to, in English:

    • Predict content of simple texts through skimming
    • Identify main ideas and details in beginning-level materials on familiar topics
    • Read simple texts critically to evaluate advantages and disadvantages or pros and cons of information presented
    • Express opinions and support them with specific information
    • Relate previous knowledge to reading
    • Write simple and compound sentences that show an understanding of basic grammar and punctuation
    • Use brainstorming, graphic organizers, and simple outlines to generate and organize information for writing
    • Write simple well-organized explanatory and descriptive paragraphs following the rules for academic writing
    • Write a business letter following appropriate format


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 60
  
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    INTL 077 Beginning Academic Writing

    4 credits
    This course, for non-native speakers of English who are international students, focuses on writing a properly structured paragraph. The use of simple graphic organizers, basic grammar, and critical thinking skills is emphasized in order to approach composition effectively.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test, or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: INTL 059 , INTL 078  or INTL 084 , and INTL 079 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to, in English:

    • Compose a variety of complete, correct sentences
    • Edit incorrect and/or incomplete sentences
    • Develop proper topic sentences
    • Brainstorm ideas and write outlines to serve as a basis for paragraph writing
    • Write effective paragraphs with topic sentences, appropriate support, and concluding sentences
    • Write the following types of paragraphs using a variety of simple, compound and compound-complex sentences: narrative, process, persuasive, compare/contrast and cause/effect 


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    INTL 078 Beginning Academic Listening and Speaking

    5 credits
    This course, for non-native speakers of English who are international students, emphasizes the listening and speaking skills necessary for inferring, evaluating, analyzing, and interpreting in English at the beginner level.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test, or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: INTL 059 , INTL 077 , and INTL 079 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to, in English:

    • Hypothesize and support positions with reasons using simple words, phrases, and learned expressions
    • Evaluate opinions
    • Express concern, as well as give and receive advice about health problems using basic vocabulary and phrasing
    • Discuss travel interests and preferences
    • Discuss language learning opinions, experiences, and personal strategies at a basic level
    • Infer speaker’s tone and attitude
    • Prepare and make short, simple presentations


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    INTL 079 Beginning Academic Reading

    5 credits
    This course, for non-native speakers of English who are international students, emphasizes reading skills, develops integrated critical thinking and language -learning strategies, and vocabulary building at the beginning level.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test, or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: INTL 077 , INTL 078  or INTL 084 , IINTL 059.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to, in English:

    • Differentiate between main ideas and supporting details in high-beginner level materials
    • Evaluate simple written texts for advantages and disadvantages/pros and cons
    • Express opinions and support them with specific information
    • Give advice and offer suggestions in an advice column format
    • Effectively use brainstorming, graphic organizers, and outlines to generate and organize information for writing
    • Write clear simple and complex sentences, showing some control of basic grammar (e.g. present and past tense) and punctuation
    • Write clear simple academic paragraphs with topic sentences, support and conclusions


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    INTL 081 Low-Intermediate Grammar

    4 credits
    This course, for non-native speakers of English who are international students, builds upon and reinforces grammatical concepts taught in INTL 059  while introducing and developing more complex academic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary skills.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test, or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: INTL 085 , INTL 086A , INTL 084  or INTL 088 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Write clear simple and complex sentences in English, showing some control of intermediate grammar with 75% accuracy
    • Identify and use the simple present, present progressive, simple past, past progressive, and future tenses
    • Identify and use the present perfect and past perfect tenses
    • Form and respond to information questions
    • Generate and respond to tag questions
    • Identify and generate comparative, equative, and superlative statements
    • Identify and use appropriate punctuation for simple and complex sentences


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    INTL 084 Low-Intermediate Listening and Speaking

    5 credits
    This course, for non-native speakers of English who are international students, builds upon and reinforces skills taught in INTL 078  with an emphasis on further developing academic listening and speaking skills and critical thinking skills at the low-intermediate level.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test, or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: INTL 077  or INTL086, INTL 075  or INTL 085 , INTL 059  or INTL 081 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to, in English:

    • Interpret tone, infer meaning, and hypothesize another’s point of view
    • Relate listening to personal experience, prior knowledge, and opinions
    • Predict content of low-intermediate texts, listen for main ideas, and draw conclusions
    • Express and defend opinions using a varied vocabulary and a variety of grammatical structures
    • Discuss pros and cons of a situation
    • Lead group discussions and manage group interactions
    • Prepare and perform simple and brief presentations
    • Utilize appropriate language to agree and disagree in a low-level discussion format
    • Use culturally appropriate language to offer advice and make suggestions 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    INTL 085 Low-Intermediate Academic Reading

    5 credits
    This course, for non-native speakers of English who are international students, builds on and reinforces reading skills taught in INTL 079  and further develops integrated critical thinking and language -learning strategies, and vocabulary building at the low-intermediate level.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test, or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: INTL 081 , INTL 086, INTL 084  or INTL 088 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to, in English:

    • Predict content, read low-intermediate level texts for main ideas and identify details
    • Relate readings to other readings and prior knowledge
    • Infer and draw conclusions
    • Support personal opinions through examples
    • Practice brainstorming techniques and organizing ideas through the use of graphic organizers and basic outlines
    • Develop proper topic sentences with appropriate support
    • Write a variety of sentences, including compound and compound-complex, although with grammatical errors
    • Write extended paragraphs with relevant topic sentences, appropriate support and conclusions
    • Edit and evaluate others’ writing in a peer-editing context
    • Write effective opinion, descriptive, and contrast paragraphs
    • Write a basic 5-paragraph essay following appropriate format


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    INTL 086A Low-Intermediate Academic Writing

    4 credits
    This course, for non-native speakers of English who are international students, builds on and reinforces skills taught in INTL 077  while introducing and developing more complex writing skills such as using graphic organizers and outlines to develop paragraphs.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test, or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: INTL 081 , INTL 085 , and INTL 084  or INTL 088 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    INTL 086B High-Intermediate Academic Writing

    4 credits
    This course, for non-native speakers of English who are international students, builds on and reinforces the academic writing skills taught in INTL 086A . Students study a variety of organizational patterns for writing more effective paragraphs and essays.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test, or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: INTL 087 , INTL 089 , and INTL 088 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    INTL 087 High-Intermediate Grammar

    4 credits
    This course, for non-native speakers of English who are international students, builds upon and reinforces grammatical concepts taught in INTL 081  while introducing and developing more complex academic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary skills.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test, or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: INTL 086B , INTL 088 , and INTL 089 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Write clear simple, complex, and compound-complex sentences in English, showing good control of intermediate grammar with 75% accuracy
    • Identify and use passive tenses
    • Identify and use participial adjectives
    • Identify and use modals
    • Identify and use adjective and noun clauses
    • Identify and use gerund and infinitive constructions
    • Identify and use noun and adjective preposition combinations
    • Identify and appropriately punctuate complex sentence constructions


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    INTL 088 High-Intermediate Academic Listening & Speaking

    5 credits
    This course, for non-native speakers of English who are international students, builds on and reinforces the skills taught in INTL 084  in preparation for college level classes requiring a higher level of communicative competence.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test, or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: INTL 086A  or INTL 086B , INTL 081  or INTL 087 , INTL 085  or INTL 089 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to, in English:

    • Interpret speaker’s tone and infer meaning and point of view
    • Relate listening to personal experience, prior knowledge, and opinions
    • Infer, synthesize, predict, and draw conclusions
    • Compare and contrast information from intermediate-level listening excerpts
    • Express and defend opinions using learned phrases as well as appropriate vocabulary from knowledge bank
    • Formulate and ask appropriate questions
    • Participate in group discussions using a variety of sentence structures and generally correct grammar
    • Effectively lead and manage group discussions
    • Utilize preparation strategies and speech-making techniques to make effective presentations 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    INTL 089 High-Intermediate Reading

    5 credits
    This course, for non-native speakers of English who are international students, builds on and reinforces the academic reading skills taught in INTL 085 . Students are exposed to a variety of authentic texts and study reading strategies to improve reading speed and comprehension.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test, or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: INTL 088 , INTL 086B , and INTL 087 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to, in English:

    • Read intermediate level texts and identify main ideas and details
    • Apply appropriate reading strategies to determine meanings of unfamiliar words
    • Relate readings to other readings and prior knowledge
    • Infer, synthesize, predict and draw conclusions
    • Interpret routine charts and tables
    • Write a variety of sentences using appropriate conjunctions, transitions, and punctuation most of the time
    • Utilize brainstorming techniques and organize ideas through the use of graphic organizers and detailed outlines
    • Write effective paragraphs and basic essays using the western academic English paragraph format
    • Develop proper thesis statements and topic sentences
    • Write essays with thesis statements, relevant topic sentences, appropriate support and concluding paragraphs
    • Write the following essays at an introductory level of competence:  narrative, persuasive, cause/effect, and compare/contrast 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    INTL 092 International Faculty Institute

    0 credits
    This course, for international English-language teachers, focuses on the theories and methodologies of language teaching and their application in the classroom. This course emphasizes the application of teaching practices to help teachers become more effective educators.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate score on IEP Placement test, or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Summer

    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10

Machining Technology

  
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    MACH 105 Introduction to Manual Machining

    4 credits
    Students will learn theoretical and practical knowledge of shop safety, machine processes, machine tools, speed and feeds, introduction to Proto Trak and conversational control, and basic shop math.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 106, MACH 111, MACH 141, and MACH 161

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Grind and sharpen lathe tools
    • Apply general shop safety procedures 
    • Use basic milling machine operations
    • Ream, tap, countersink, and counter bore
    • Use dial and test indicators
    • Demonstrate how to tram-in a mill head
    • Demonstrate how to dial in a lathe 4-jaw chuck
    • Use an engine lathe for basic turning and facing operations.
    • Demonstrate proper technique in measuring and precision layout


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    MACH 106 Material Removal - Manual and Conversational Control

    4 credits
    Students learn material removal processes common to the machine trades including turning, milling, drilling, and grinding while making several projects. Students are also introduced to the use of the conversational control using Proto Trak mills and lathes.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 105 , MACH 111, MACH 141, and MACH 161

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Select appropriate cutting tools for various processes
    • Demonstrate use of material removal techniques
    • Produce finished parts that meet industry and shop standards
    • Prepare rough material (stock) for machining
    • Operate machines effectively and safely


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    MACH 108 Fundamentals of Machining for Engineering

    4 credits
    Students will learn theoretical and practical knowledge of shop safety, machine tools, tool geometry, blueprints, speed and feeds, precision measuring, and basic shop math. This course is designed for engineering graphics majors.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087 , ABED 046 , or equivalent placement scores, or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use dial indicators
    • Read shop drawings and sketches
    • Grind and sharpen lathe tools
    • Perform precision measuring and layout
    • Use an engine lathe for basic turning and facing operations.
    • Apply general shop safety procedures
    • Use power and hand cutting tools
    • Select and sharpen drill bits
    • Accurately locate hole centers
    • Perform basic milling machine operations             
    • Ream, tap, countersink, and counter bore
    • Perform basic surface grinding 


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    MACH 111 Introduction to Measuring Applications

    3 credits
    This courses introduces the use of precision measuring tools such as micrometers, calipers, gage blocks, and indicators.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 105 , MACH 106 , MACH 141, and MACH 161

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate ability to read and interpret measurements within the degree of accuracy for those measuring tools or setup tools
    • Select appropriate formulas for speed and feed calculations
    • Demonstrate ability to setup machine tools to the shop standard
    • Apply correct parameters for speed and feed calculations
    • Differentiate between measuring tools
    • Select proper measuring tools for different situations


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    MACH 113 Inspection GD&T

    2 credits
    This course covers inspection of part features in order to contrast the measurements with the print Geometric Tolerancing specification. 

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 143, MACH 145, MACH 162, and MACH 175

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Review and discuss engineering drawings
    • Interpret feature control frames
    • Develop an inspection plan
    • Setup and inspect part features
    • Apply inspection measurements to geometric tolerances
    • Interpret inspection results


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    MACH 115 Introduction to CNC Machining

    4 credits
    This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of CNC machining through the creation of projects. The student will learn to hand write G and M code, safely set-up and operate a CNC mill, and complete machined parts to the shop standard.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 116, MACH 131, and MACH 133

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the different types of machine tools
    • Identify the different axis of motion in a cnc machine
    • Demonstrate proper setup and operation of machine tools
    • Modify G and M code at the machine control
    • Analyze and correct any error messages
    • Create G and M code that will safely and efficiently create parts
    • Predict the next movement of the machine by reading the code
    • Memorize G and M codes


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    MACH 116 Material Removal - CNC Lathe and Mill

    6 credits
    This course covers materials removal processes common to CNC machine tools.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 115 , MACH 131 , and MACH 133  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Select appropriate cutting tools for various processes
    • Demonstrate use of material removal techniques
    • Produce finished parts that meet industry and shop standards
    • Prepare rough material (stock) for machining
    • Operate machines effectively and safely
    • Demonstrate safe setup and operation of CNC machines


    Total Hours: 120 Lab or Clinical Hours: 120
  
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    MACH 125 CNC Projects and Practice

    4 credits
    Students will improve their machining skills and speed on CNC machines. Students will take skills that they have learned in past classes and combine them with new skills in areas like can cycles, new materials, tighter tolerances, and probing.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 126, MACH 127, and MACH 135

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Produce the same part multiple times, improving the time to complete the part each time
    • Associate training given on can cycles in the past with use of new can cycles
    • Machine parts from a variety of materials
    • Complete parts using past skills combined with new skills (e.g., thread milling)
    • Apply trigonometry to solve problems to complete setups and make parts


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    MACH 126 Advanced Material Removal

    6 credits
    Students learn advanced material removal processes common to manual and CNC machine tools. 

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 125 , MACH 127, and MACH 135

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Select appropriate cutting tools for various processes
    • Demonstrate use of material removal techniques
    • Produce finished parts that meet industry and shop standards
    • Prepare rough material (stock) for machining
    • Operate machines effectively and safely
    • Demonstrate safe setup and operation of CNC machines


    Total Hours: 110 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 100
  
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    MACH 127 Machining Processes

    4 credits
    The course covers the series of actions or steps taken in order to achieve a successful machining process. Students will analyze and develop effective processes for producing given parts.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 125 , MACH 126 , and MACH 135

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Compare efficiency of different processes for the same part
    • Distinguish the steps that make up a machining process
    • Illustrate a repeatable plan to machine a part
    • Predict what may cause problems in a plan for machining a part
    • Propose problems that an operator could have in running production
    • Recommend remedies to a machine process


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    MACH 131 Introduction to CNC Programming

    2 credits
    This course introduces students to the programming of a CNC machines. Given the CNC programming codes and explanations, students will produce CNC programs to control the operation of a CNC machine in an accurate and safe manner. Students will develop a foundation to write simple programs and to read more complex programs.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 115 , MACH 116, and MACH 133

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe axis coordinates XYZ ABC
    • Apply proper calculations of speeds and feeds
    • Match G, M, CNC programming code to the machine operation
    • Give examples of canned cycles and modal/non-modal commands
    • Illustrate programming format and programming syntax
    • Explain cutter compensation
    • Find errors to help crash avoidance
    • Compile lathe code versus mill code


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    MACH 133 Introduction to CNC Operations

    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to the setup and operation of CNC machines.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 115 , MACH 116, and MACH 131  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate understanding of CNC axes destination movement
    • Identify position of program reference zero
    • Demonstrate ability to safely initialize and shut down a CNC machine
    • Respond correctly to a CNC malfunction
    • Load programs onto the CNC machine
    • Navigate controller modes and functions
    • Demonstrate ability to safely start a CNC program to the shop standard
    • Perform a safe setup and first run of a part, a teardown, and a clean up to shop standard
    • Utilize CNC work-holding devices
    • Demonstrate proper use and selection of tools and tool holders
    • Discuss components and mechanics of a CNC machine
    • Manipulate and edit programs on a CNC machine
    • Demonstrate proper preventative maintenance on a CNC machine
    • Maintain proper coolant levels and proper coolant mix
    • Develop job planning skills
    • Demonstrate ability to set machine offsets and adjust cutter compensation


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    MACH 135 Production Environments

    2 credits
    Students will learn to set up a production run on a CNC machine working with written instructions that meet industry standards and determine if the production process meets both engineering print specifications and job planning requirements.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 125 , MACH 126 , and MACH 127  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate proper use of job planning sheets through a CNC setup and run
    • Maintain part feature dimensions during production
    • Demonstrate understanding of statistical process control
    • Complete operator tie-in sheets
    • Properly inspect a first article and complete proper documentation
    • Demonstrate ability to plan for production


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  
  •  

    MACH 141 Tool Geometry and Grinding

    3 credits
    In this course students will gain a basic understanding of the grinding wheel numbering system, the different types of abrasives, and some preliminary level applications. Students will be introduced to tool geometry for a variety of cutting tools and applications.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 105 , MACH 106 , MACH 111 , and MACH 161

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the meaning of each category in the grinding wheel numbering system
    • Choose different abrasives for a variety of grinding processes
    • Select proper abrasives for different materials
    • Distinguish between face mill geometry, drill geometry, endmill geometry, and single point geometry
    • Demonstrate the ability to sharpen a variety of cutting tool geometries
    • Use various cutting tool geometries for lathe and mill
    • Experience different combinations of grinding wheels with a variety of applications


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    MACH 143 Practical Shop Trigonometry

    3 credits
    This course instructs students on the implementation of trigonometric principles to solve a variety of practical machining problems. Students will also apply their new trigonometric skills in the lab, completing assignments that have a trigonometric element. 

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 113 , MACH 145, MACH 162, and MACH 175 

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Solve trigonometric equations
    • Apply trigonometry to machining solutions
    • Select the triangle that needs to be solved in machining problems
    • Relate mathematical rules to solving complex machining problems 


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    MACH 145 Materials for Machining

    2 credits
    This course covers materials study, including the identification and use of different varieties of materials and of the effects of the different alloying elements within the materials. Also included is instruction on the heat treatment of steel.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 113 , MACH 143 , MACH 162, and MACH 175

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify metals and other machinable materials
    • Demonstrate the harding of high carbon steels
    • Paraphrase some of the theoretical processes of heat treatment
    • Name some of the SAE identify number for steel and aluminum


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    MACH 161 Introduction to Drawing and Documentation

    2 credits
    Students will develop the basic foundation to interpret beginning-level engineering drawings and specifications.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 105 , MACH 106 , MACH 111 , and MACH 141  

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe basic components of a print
    • Identify various print lines and symbols
    • Identify various drawing views and projections
    • Interpret dimensions related to print tolerances
    • Interpret information in the title block and notes of a print
    • Infer information from print related to threads
    • Demonstrate proper use of inspection documents
    • Demonstrate proper use of production documents


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    MACH 162 Introduction to GD&T

    2 credits
    Students will identify and apply Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing symbols and language to engineering drawings to the standards set by the program.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 113 , MACH 143 , MACH 145 , and MACH 175

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss geometric symbols and terminology
    • Locate and use feature control frames
    • Explain rules 1, 2, and 3
    • Describe virtual condition
    • Manipulate information concerning bonus tolerance
    • Calculate coordinate and geometric tolerances
    • Use Datums, tolerances of form, orientation, profile, location, and runout


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    MACH 175 CNC Processes

    7 credits
    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) or instructor permission

    Corequisites: MACH 113 , MACH 143 , MACH 145 , and MACH 162  

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Total Hours: 120 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 100
  
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    MACH 195 Capstone Project Part I

    7 credits


    This capstone project allows students to demonstrate their accumulated knowledge and abilities in precision machining by creating a complicated assembly. The project may be chosen from a provided list, or it may be one of the students’ choosing, as long as it meets the minimum requirements and receives instructors’ approval.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) and ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    MACH 125 , MACH 126 , MACH 127 , and MACH 135  

    MACH 113 , MACH 143 , MACH 145 , MACH 162 , and MACH 175  

    Corequisites: MACH 196

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Heat treat steel
    • Complete turn table operations
    • Setup broaching
    • Accomplish precision assembly processes
    • Design and build fixtures
    • Choose fasteners
    • Turn parts to close tolerances
    • Identify and solve new problems
    • Interface with CNC machine controls
    • Successfully transfer files from computer to CNC control


    Total Hours: 120 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 100

  
  •  

    MACH 196 Capstone Project Part II

    7 credits


    This is part two of a two part class. This capstone project allows the student to demonstrate their accumulated knowledge and abilities in precision machining by creating a complicated assembly. The project may be chosen from a provided list, or it may be one of the student’s choosing, as long as it meets the minimum requirements and receives instructors’ approval.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) and ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    MACH 125 , MACH 126 , MACH 127 , and MACH 135  

    MACH 113 , MACH 143 , MACH 145 , MACH 162 , and MACH 175  

    Corequisites: MACH 195  

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Produce a part per advanced blueprint specifications
    • Solve problems using online resources
    • Calculate required information from drawing
    • Setup required inspection procedures
    • Research technical specifications using online technical manuals
    • Plan a process which uses time efficiently to create a part
    • Index parts
    • Mill parts to close tolerances
    • Slot parts
    • Key cut ways


    Total Hours: 120 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 100

  
  •  

    MACH 241 CNC Machining I: CAD/CAM Geometry and Toolpaths

    7 credits
    Students will learn to create geometry and toolpaths utilizing CAD/CAM software. The will utilize the Computer Aided Design (CAD) part of the software to develop geometry for manufacturing, such as wireframe and solid models. Students will utilize the Computer Aided Manufacturing  (CAM) part of the software to create 2.5D toolpaths used in CNC machining to produce the geometry and models developed in CAD.

    Prerequisites: Completion fo the Machine Technology program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize the CAD/CAM’s built in Help/Contents capability
    • Create, modify, and manage basic 2D wireframe and 3D solid model geometry
    • Create, modify, and manage Work Coordinates (WCS)
    • Utilize different Construction Planes and Graphics Views
    • Select the machine type and define the material type, material size, and various tool settings
    • Organize multiple machining operations and their various toolpaths
    • Create basic 2.5D toolpath while selecting the correct cutting tool and holder
    • Determine tool cutter compensation and calculate the cutter speeds and feeds
    • Verify 2.5D toolpath while checking for errors and crashes
    • Generate the CNC code and Setup Information for manufacturing
    • Create a program that includes the operations of: Slotting, Pocketing, Facing, Spotting, Chamfering, Drilling, Reaming, and Tapping
    • Pass the CNC Machining test


    Total Hours: 120 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 100
  
  •  

    MACH 242 CNC Machining II: CNC Machine Processes and Work Holding

    7 credits
    Students will continue to build their knowledge and skills of the CAD/CAM software by designing work holding through the use of CAD and learning new CNC processes, such as the 3D surface contouring toolpaths and advanced roughing cycles. Students may be requested to periodically mentor other students of earlier courses as part of their participation in this course. This class will include team-based learning and projects.

    Prerequisites: MACH 241  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create, modify and manage work holding models
    • Identify various types of work holding and work holding materials
    • Select the correct cutting tool and holder for 3D toolpaths and roughing cycles
    • Determine depths of cut and radial engagement for various toolpaths
    • Determine speeds and feeds for 3D toolpaths and advanced roughing cycles
    • Verify advanced 3D toolpaths and roughing cycles while checking for errors and crashes
    • Setup and run programs that the student has created
    • Troubleshoot toolpath or process errors during machining
    • Create a program that includes 3D surfacing and roughing toolpaths
    • Produce a product that encompasses MACH 241 and MACH 242 skills and knowledge


    Total Hours: 120 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 100
  
  •  

    MACH 243 CNC Machining III: Programming and Process Improvement

    7 credits
    Students will produce parts from the programs and work holding that they have created. While participating in a team environment, they will analyze everything from work holding, tool and tool holder selection, to the processes and their CAM toolpath parameters to see if they can better their results. Students will then create projects for production training in other machining courses. Students will periodically mentor other students of earlier courses as demonstration of their learned skills and knowledge of this and previous courses.

    Prerequisites: MACH 242  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create a production program and its associated documentation
    • Troubleshoot CNC programs
    • Improve CNC machining processes
    • Produce a product utilizing MACH 241 and MACH 242 knowledge and skills
    • Select and utilize basic work holding designs for various machining scenarios
    • Demonstrate skills and knowledge through mentoring students of earlier courses


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60

Mathematics

  
  •  

    MATH 081 Technical Mathematics I

    5 credits
    Technical Mathematics I is the first of three courses in applied mathematics. By utilizing the foundations of measurements, problem solving and equations, students learn how to apply their mathematical knowledge to applied problems.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply basic algebraic operations to applied topics
    • Apply and calculate percentages as applied to discounts and mechanical systems
    • Utilize a standard approach and mathematical logic to solve problems
    • Utilize geometry to solve application problems
    • Use functions and graphs to interpret and solve basic equations
    • Check, utilize, and apply conversions to applications
    • Use the mathematical critical thinking skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems using basic algebraic operations


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 087 Quantitative Literacy

    5 credits
    This course develops student skills in interpreting, understanding, and using quantitative information. It integrates numeracy and proportional, statistical, and algebraic reasoning with an emphasis on critical thinking and problem solving. College success strategies are integrated with mathematical concepts.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087 )

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to: 

    • Demonstrate quantitative reasoning to analyze problems, critique arguments, and draw and justify conclusions
    • Accurately perform arithmetic operations involving fractions, decimals, percents, and signed numbers
    • Recall and apply the standard order of operations
    • Use proportional reasoning in solving applied problems
    • Use statistical and probabilistic reasoning in solving applied problems
    • Explain how quantities change, including multiplicative vs. additive and relative vs. absolute
    • Use estimation skills to solve problems, detect errors, and check accuracy
    • Interpret and use scientific notation
    • Make comparisons of relative magnitudes and work with various representations of quantitative information: ratios, rates, percentages, conversions, indices, scales, etc.
    • Organize and summarize data using a variety of representations, such as tables, graphs, and formulas
    • Use variables to represent quantities
    • Solve simple algebraic equations
    • Read and interpret quantitative information from a variety of real-world sources
    • Analyze and use quantitative information to support an argument
    • Recognize, make, and evaluate quantitative assumptions
    • Communicate quantitative results both in writing and orally using appropriate language, symbolism, data, and graphs
    • Use technology appropriately as a tool for calculations and to gather, research, and analyze quantitative information
    • Apply logical and time-effective study skills to mathematics


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 090 Introduction to Algebra for STEM

    5 credits
    This course covers basic algebraic concepts and operations that will prepare STEM students for MATH 099 . The course emphasizes solving and graphing first degree equations, inequalities, and systems of equations. Additional topics include exponents, polynomials, and function notation, as well as a brief introduction to second degree equations and factoring.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  or placement into MATH 090

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply properties of the real number system to both numeric and algebraic problems
    • Apply the rules of exponents
    • Add, subtract, multiply, and divide polynomials
    • Solve first degree equations algebraically
    • Identify key characteristics of linear functions
    • Create linear equation models and apply those equations to making predictions
    • Compare and contrast methods to solve and graph equations with methods needed to solve and graph inequalities
    • Solve formulas for a specified variable
    • Describe linear functions in multiple forms including: tables, graphs, and equations
    • Solve systems of equations with two variables
    • Use factoring to solve second degree equations
    • Use the mathematical critical thinking skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems involving basic algebra


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 091 Technical Mathematics II

    5 credits
    Technical Mathematics II is the second of three courses in applied mathematics. This course covers technical and commercial mathematical applications, problem solving, and describing solutions and problems in a graphical format.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  or MATH 081 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize volume and conversion formulas for measurements
    • Demonstrate an understanding and knowledge of applying physics formulas for applications
    • Read and calculate data for electrical and mechanical systems
    • Compute data and program set calculators (computer program simulations)
    • Calculate and apply sine wave applications
    • Analyze and work with displacement
    • Utilize compression ratios for understanding mechanical designs
    • Represent and utilize a graphical design for mechanical systems
    • Demonstrate how to calculate physics concepts in terms of physical systems of horse power and torque
    • Use the mathematical critical thinking skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 093 Applied Math and Computing Fundamentals

    1-5 credits
    This course teaches the fundamentals of math in preparation for the Applied Math and Computing sequence which begins with Math 131. Content includes arithmetic, algebra, geometry, mathematical modeling with linear, quadratic and exponential functions, and algorithmic thinking.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Corequisites: MATH 131

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Compute with fractions, decimals, ratios, proportions, and percents
    • Read and interpret graphs of linear, quadratic, and exponential functions
    • Use scientific notation during computation
    • Distinguish between exact and approximate solutions
    • Solve both symbolic and word problems involving linear and quadratic equations
    • Add and multiply polynomial expressions
    • Solve and graph problems involving inequalities
    • Simplify and solve equations involving radicals and complex numbers
    • Describe the algorithmic steps in solving simple algebraic problems
    • Use a symbolic computing program to solve algebraic problems
    • Apply the mathematical skills of computational problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, discrete modeling, and formal logic to solve problems requiring reasoning, critical thinking, and computation 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 098 Essentials of Intermediate Algebra

    5 credits
    This course focuses on the intermediate algebra skills needed for students planning to take MATH& 107 , MATH& 146 , or MATH 147 . Emphasis is on data analysis, mathematical modeling, quantitative reasoning, and working with linear and exponential functions. Applications with quadratic, rational, and radical functions are also covered.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  or equivalent placement score for MATH 098

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Use dimensional analysis to make calculations
    • Interpret and move flexibly between multiple formats, including graphs, tables, equations, and words
    • Solve applied problems involving linear, quadratic, exponential, rational, and radical equations
    • Calculate the slope of linear data and interpret slope within the context of the problem
    • Distinguish between linear and exponential growth models
    • Apply exponent rules to simplify expressions with exponents
    • Solve formulas for a specified variable
    • Use geometric concepts of area and volume in solving applied problems
    • Create and use models (tables, words, graphs, equations) of real-world situations
    • Analyze and use quantitative information to support an argument
    • Communicate quantitative results both in writing and orally using appropriate language, symbolism, data, and graphs
    • Demonstrate quantitative reasoning to analyze problems, critique arguments, and draw and justify conclusions
    • Use technology appropriately as a tool for calculations and to gather, research, and analyze quantitative information


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 099 Intermediate Algebra for STEM

    5 credits
    This course covers the intermediate algebra skills and content needed for students going into STEM fields. The course emphasizes quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions; rational and radical expressions and equations; roots and exponents; complex numbers; functions; and graphing.

    Prerequisites: MATH 090  or placement in MATH 099

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and apply the rules of algebra to solve algebraic problems
    • Demonstrate the use of rational, irrational, and complex numbers in problem solving
    • Solve problems involving linear, quadratic, logarithmic,  and exponential equations and functions
    • Differentiate among linear, quadratic, and exponential functions by emphasizing key characteristics and graphs
    • Simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations, using factoring when necessary
    • Identify functions and use functional notation and terminology
    • Solve problems involving inequalities
    • Simplify radical expressions and solve radical equations
    • Apply technology appropriately as a tool for calculations
    • Research and analyze quantitative information using technology
    • Use the mathematical critical thinking skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems involving intermediate algebra


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 099X Accelerated Intermediate Algebra for STEM

    5 credits
    This course is a single-quarter refresher of both Elementary and Intermediate Algebra skills to prepare for STEM courses. Topics include solving and graphing linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, rational and radical functions; roots and exponents; complex numbers; inequalities; and systems of equations.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  or placement into MATH 099X

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the use of integers, rational, irrational, and complex numbers in problem solving
    • Solve problems involving linear, quadratic, logarithmic, and exponential equations and functions
    • Differentiate between linear, quadratic, and exponential functions by emphasizing key characteristics and graphs
    • Apply the rules of exponents
    • Add, subtract, multiply, and divide polynomials
    • Use factoring to solve second degree equations
    • Simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations, using factoring when necessary
    • Identify functions and use functional notation and terminology
    • Simplify radical expressions and solve radical equations
    • Compare and contrast methods to solve and graph equations with methods needed to solve and graph inequalities
    • Solve formulas for a specified variable
    • Solve systems of equations with two variables
    • Create linear and quadratic equation models and apply those equations to making predictions
    • Apply technology appropriately as a tool for calculations
    • Research and analyze quantitative information using technology
    • Use the mathematical critical thinking skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems involving basic and intermediate algebra


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 102 Quantitative Reasoning

    5 credits
    Quantitative Reasoning covers trigonometry, set theory and logic, and exponential and logarithmic functions. General and commercial applications are emphasized. Problem solving and class exercises focus on team projects.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use trigonometric functions to solve right triangle problems and applications
    • Use inverse trigonometric functions to solve right triangle problems and applications
    • Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to solve right triangle problems
    • Use the techniques of sets and Venn diagrams to solve applied problems
    • Understand the meaning of connectives in logic
    • Represent data in graphic, verbal, symbolic, and tabular forms
    • Distinguish between exponential and linear growth
    • Solve application problems using exponential and logarithmic techniques
    • Demonstrate how mathematical concepts relate to their field of study
    • Work within a small group to complete a mathematical project and/or presentation
    • Use the mathematical critical thinking skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems involving trigonometry, logic, and exponential functions


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 103 Technical Mathematics III

    5 credits
    Technical Mathematics III is the last course in a three course series in applied mathematics. Technical applications are: Computer Logic, Computer Algebra, Venn Diagrams, Mathematical Design and Modeling, Calculus (3-D Graphs) and others.

    Prerequisites: MATH 090  or MATH 091 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize mechanical physics for fluid and Pascal’s principle
    • Calculate and distinguish volume, pressure, force, and the use of hydraulics
    • Utilize computer algebra for computer conversions and mechanical design
    • Apply advanced algebra in electronics applications (circuits and complex fractions)
    • Apply trigonometric functions in electronics
    • Develop and evaluate logic gates for electronics applications
    • Represent, create, and apply 3-D calculus graphics
    • Apply basic concepts in statistics, exponential functions, and vectors
    • Use the mathematical critical thinking skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems involving advanced algebra, trigonometry, and computer logic


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 111 College Algebra with Applications

    5 credits
    This course provides a comprehensive review of algebra, graphs, and functions, and includes an in-depth study of linear, quadratic, and trigonometric functions. Problem-solving using geometry and vector analysis is also covered. Practical applications are emphasized.

    Prerequisites: MATH 099  or MATH 099X  (or placement into MATH 111)

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Solve, graph, and interpret linear and quadratic equations, functions, and inequalities
    • Graph, transform, and compose functions
    • Solve systems of equations in two and three variables
    • Use trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions to solve problems
    • Use vector analysis to solve problems in physics
    • Use quantitative modeling to solve problems involving functions, linear algebra, geometry, and  trigonometry


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 145 Finite Mathematics for Business

    5 credits
    Finite Math covers the computational knowledge, skills, and techniques necessary for success in modern business. Content includes functions and their graphs, linear programming, matrices, combinatorics, logic, statistics, and the applications of math to finance and economics.

    Prerequisites: MATH 099  (A grade of 2.5 or higher is highly recommended).

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Compute simple and compound interest
    • Determine the present and future values of annuities
    • Solve small systems of equalities using matrix methods
    • Solve small systems of inequalities using geometric and simplex methods
    • Explain set and logical notation
    • Determine if conclusions logically follow from premises
    • Determine conditional and independent probabilities of joint events
    • Apply counting techniques to solve problems in combinatorics and probability
    • Apply the mathematical skills of computational problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution following structural rules, discrete modeling, and formal logic to solve problems requiring reasoning, critical thinking, and computation


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 147 Digital Mathematics

    5 credits
    Digital Mathematics covers the finite mathematical knowledge, skills and techniques necessary for success in computer-based technologies. Content includes counting, number systems, logic, relations, recursion, graphs and trees, algorithms, data structures, digital circuits, software languages, and programming.

    Prerequisites: MATH 098  (recommended) or MATH 099 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply counting techniques to solve simple problems in probability
    • Explain the integer system expressed in various bases
    • Identify logical elements in artificial languages
    • Determine tautological, contradictory, and contingent logical forms
    • Differentiate between functions and relations
    • Appreciate the inductive structure of mathematics
    • Solve simple problems using recursion
    • Explain the fundamental rules of graph and tree data structures
    • Construct simple algorithms for computation
    • Express problems using a variety of different data structures
    • Write simple computer programs in very high-level software languages
    • Describe the use of logic and recursion in semiconductor circuitry
    • Apply the mathematical skills of computational problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, discrete modeling, and formal logic to solve problems requiring reasoning, critical thinking, and computation


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 220 Linear Algebra

    5 credits
    Linear algebra serves as an introduction to matrix theory. Topics include matrix operations, determinants, solving systems of equations, n-dimensional vector spaces, subspaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and their applications.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 142  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform matrix operations, calculate determinants, find inverses for matrices (where possible), and find the transpose of a matrix
    • Use elementary row operations to solve systems of linear equations using Gaussian Elimination and Gauss-Jordan reduction methods
    • Identify a system of linear equations as independent, inconsistent, or dependent
    • Perform vector operations, use properties of vector operations, and determine vector subspaces, spanning sets, and bases of vector spaces
    • Show that a set of vectors forms the basis for a set, and find the dimension of a subspace
    • Find inner products and find a basis for a given inner product space
    • Use matrices to perform transformations between vector spaces and to identify isomorphisms
    • Find the kernel, range, rank, and nullity of a linear transformation
    • Find the standard matrix for a given linear transformation and use this matrix to find the image of a given vector
    • Find real eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a square matrix
    • Diagonalize symmetric matrices
    • Use the mathematical critical thinking skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems requiring reasoning, critical thinking, and computation


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 230 Matrix Algebra with Applications

    5 credits
    This course serves as an introduction to matrix theory and linear algebra. Topics covered include: systems of equations, Gaussian elimination, LU decomposition, Euclidean vector spaces and subpaces, linear transformations, basis sets and dimensions, span of a vector space, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization, least squares methods, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Applications are emphasized.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 163  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform matrix operations, calculate determinants, find inverses for matrices (where possible), and find the transpose of a matrix
    • Use elementary row operations to solve systems of linear equations using Gaussian Elimination and Gauss-Jordan reduction methods
    • Apply LU decomposition methods to factorize a matrix
    • Identify a system of linear equations as independent, inconsistent, or dependent
    • Identify properties of Euclidean vector spaces and the effects of linear transformations
    • Perform vector operations; use properties of vector operations; and determine vector subspaces, spanning sets, and bases of vector spaces
    • Show that a set of vectors forms the basis for a set, and find the dimension of a subspace
    • Find inner products and find a basis for a given inner product space
    • Use matrices to perform transformations between vector spaces and to identify isomorphisms
    • Find the kernel, range, rank, and nullity of a linear transformation
    • Find the standard matrix for a given linear transformation and use this matrix to find the image of a given vector
    • Use Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization to find orthonormal vectors
    • Apply QR decomposition methods to factorize a matrix
    • Find real eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a square matrix
    • Diagonalize symmetric matrices
    • Apply matrix algebra to data fitting and least squares analysis
    • Use the mathematical critical thinking skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems requiring reasoning, critical thinking, and computation


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 238 Differential Equations

    5 credits
    This course involves studies of first and second order differential equations. Topics covered include techniques for solving differential equations, series solutions, Laplace transforms, numerical approaches, and matrix methods to solve systems of linear differential equations. Real life modeling, applications, and data visualization using appropriate technology are emphasized. 

    Prerequisites: MATH& 152  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe differential equations using appropriate mathematical notation, symbols, and graphs
    • Classify differential equations by order, linearity, and homogeneity
    • Solve first and second order linear differential equations
    • Solve linear equations with constant coefficients
    • Use separation of variables, method of undermined coefficients, and variation of parameters to solve differential equations
    • Use power series methods to solve differential equations
    • Determine whether a system of functions is linearly independent using the Wronksian
    • Use Laplace transforms and their inverses to solve differential equations
    • Solve systems of linear differential equations using matrix techniques and eigenvalues
    • Use numerical methods to solve differential equations
    • Model real-life applications using differential equations
    • Use technology for finding solutions and data visualization
    • Use the mathematical critical thinking skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems requiring reasoning, critical thinking, and computation


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 246 Business Statistics

    5 credits
    The course is designed to teach business managers to interpret statistical analyses and apply statistical methods in a business context. Topics include data description, data presentation, statistical analysis, statistical interpretation, and statistical inference. Statistical results will be used as a foundation in answering business-related questions and making evidence-based decisions.

    Prerequisites: Admission to BASTLM program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and implement statistically valid business data collection methods, and perform detailed statistical analysis using Excel and/or PASW
    • Present analytics for business applications using descriptive statistics and visualization
    • Apply linear regression to business data using Excel and/or PASW, and express how multiple regression can be utilized to improve upon linear regression
    • Apply probability distributions and statistical tools used for analysis and decision making in a business management context
    • Calculate and interpret measures of statistical inference, and apply these measures to  decision-making in a business management context
    • Interpret the results of hypothesis tests and Chi-square analyses using business related examples
    • Define the Central Limit Theorem, and apply its principles to Control Charts


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 335 Computational Design

    5 credits
    Computational Design studies the use of computational technology in the design process. The course focuses on algorithmic thinking and the use of modern software tools to generate, explore, iterate, refine, and solve specific design problems. Specific skills include parametric design, programming concepts and environments, computational grammars and L-systems, and genetic algorithms.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 107  or any college-level math course with intermediate algebra as a prerequisite

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH 351 Biostatistics

    5 credits
    Introduction to statistical analysis of biological data. Topics include experimental design and hypothesis testing, descriptive statistics, probability, validity, reliability, chi-square distribution, confidence intervals, power, sample size, and introduction to various parametric and non-parametric tests.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH& 107 Math in Society

    5 credits
    Math in Society is a survey course in practical mathematics. Core topics of the course include proportional reasoning, probability, descriptive statistics, growth and decay models (linear and exponential), and the mathematics of personal finance. Other topics that might be addressed include, but are not limited to: modern geometry, trigonometry, sets and logic, discrete math topics (such as graph theory, scheduling, voting theory, game theory, or fair division), and math in the arts.

    Prerequisites: MATH 098  (recommended), or MATH 099 , or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use proportions and ratios to interpret quantities and estimate the relative size of quantities
    • Apply proportionality to solve and analyze a variety of multi-step contextual problems
    • Use formulas and perform relevant calculations pertaining to personal finance to solve context-based scenarios
    • Analyze and critique claims related to personal finance (i.e. loans, mortgages, annuities, etc.) to make informed decisions
    • Calculate and interpret probabilities, including conditional probabilities, and use those calculations to make informed decisions
    • Analyze and critique statements about probability and risk that appear in the media (i.e. advertisements, odds, medical test results, etc.)
    • Recognize and categorize methods for obtaining data, discuss possible sources of bias, and use this information to make an informed decision given a scenario
    • Use appropriate tools and strategies to describe and display authentic data (including boxplots, histograms, pie charts, and other graph types)
    • Calculate, interpret, analyze, and critique numerical summaries of data (including measures of center and spread), and use these values to compare and contrast two or more samples or populations
    • Analyze data and/or scenarios to determine if they describe linear or exponential growth
    • Create linear and exponential models for an authentic situation
    • Use, interpret, and analyze linear and exponential models to make predictions, discussing appropriateness and limitations of the model
    • Read a complex problem requiring quantitative and/or symbolic analysis, use flexibility in selecting a solution strategy, and impose an appropriate mathematical structure or mathematical procedure in solving the problem
    • Determine the reasonableness and implications of mathematical solutions, recognize the limitations of the methods used in context, and then apply those methods to making personal and societal choices


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    MATH& 141 Pre-Calculus I

    5 credits
    Precalculus I includes the study of linear, absolute value, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions.

    Prerequisites: MATH 099  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply the principles of basic algebra and coordinate geometry to solve math problems
    • Analyze and solve equations verbally, algebraically, graphically, and numerically
    • Use mathematical modeling to solve application problems and interpret the solution in the context of the problem
    • Simplify and evaluate combined functions and composite functions
    • Describe how transformations of functions affect their graphs
    • Determine key features of functions, such as domain, range, asymptotes, and intercepts
    • Graph linear, absolute value, piecewise, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Find an equation of a function from its graph
    • Find the inverse of a one-to-one function
    • Apply the properties and laws of logarithms
    • Interpret and analyze linear and non-linear data to develop appropriate models


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
 

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