Catalog 2017-2018 
    
    Mar 03, 2021  
Catalog 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Electronics

  
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    LASR 201 Fundamentals of Light and Lasers

    6 credits
    This course will provide students with a basic understanding of light and its integration into opto-electronic devices (e.g. lasers). Safety standards and procedures will be emphasized throughout the course to thoroughly familiarize the student with the proper photonics work environment. This course is built upon a comprehensive laboratory program that develops a practical intuition to complement conceptual understanding. Application of optical principles to the analysis and characterization of laser systems is emphasized.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 110 , ELEC 120 , and MATH 098  or MATH 099  (or placement scores for any MATH& course), or instructor permission

    Corequisites: PHYS& 114  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define the wide variety of employment opportunities available to Opto-electronic Technicians
    • Define these properties of light: wavelength, frequency, speed, amplitude, energy, phase, coherence, and polarization
    • Describe the electromagnetic spectrum and diagram the main optical regions
    • Describe safety procedures to be followed when working with lasers and optics
    • Demonstrate how to set up optical systems involving optical components, optical benches, and optical diagnostic equipment
    • Demonstrate how to handle, store, clean, and characterize optical components
    • Distinguish between laser and non-laser types of light sources and identify their characteristics
    • Describe the following basic laser classifications based on the appropriate hazards: Class 1, 2, 3a, 3b, and 4
    • Practice and communicate laser safety and describe eye damage related to wavelength (different wavelength regimes for Cornea, Lens and Retinal damage) and exposure times
    • Describe optical systems in terms of fundamental physical optics: waves, rays, reflection, refraction, dispersion, critical angle, thin and thick lenses, F-number, and numerical aperture
    • Describe optical phenomena and systems in terms of fundamental physical optics: Huygen’s principle, constructive & destructive interference, diffraction patterns, Brewsters angle, and polarizers
    • Describe waveguide TIR Principles and their importance in current technologies 
    • Describe and characterize the output of laser light in terms of wavelength, optical waist, power, irradiance, Rayleigh range, and divergence


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    LASR 210 Laser and Optical Systems and Applications

    5 credits
    This course will provide students with a fundamental overview and understanding of the most common types of laser and optical sources and their associated applications. Laser assembly, alignment, and diagnostics will form the foundation of this course. The student will develop a working knowledge of He-Ne, CO2, diode, Nd:YAG, Ar+, and fiber laser systems. LED lighting and Photodiode detection systems will also be covered. Laboratory and hands on learning are emphasized. Safety standards and procedures will be emphasized throughout the course to thoroughly familiarize the student with the proper photonics work environment. 

    Prerequisites: LASR 201  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Determine focused beam spot size and location
    • Measure laser power output (peak and average)
    • Measure and calculate power density
    • Use an IR alignment scope
    • Assemble and characterize CW, pulsed, and Q-switched laser sources
    • Generate 2nd  harmonic (e.g. use KTP) for different laser formats demonstrating peak-power benefits
    • Describe basic optical harmonic conversion and Energy and Momentum Conservation
    • Evaluate the use and appropriateness of lasers for common engineering metrology applications
    • Calculate optical beam propagation through free space and fibers
    • Describe safety procedures to be followed when working with lasers and optics
    • Describe and demonstrate fiber coupling and operation and apply the principles to optimize fiber coupling efficiency
    • Specify the proper laser sources for common applications 
    • Describe the safety precautions and lab protective gear for laser systems: Class 1, 2, 3a, 3b, and 4
    • Set up and align Michelson interferometers and define optical interference and its basic uses in industry
    • Describe, measure, and apply correctly radiometric and luminous flux definitions and measurments
    • Describe and characterize the output of laser light in terms of wavelength, optical waist, power, irradiance, Rayleigh range, and divergence


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    LASR 220 Communication, Imaging, and Remote Sensing

    6 credits
    This course will provide the student with a fundamental overview and understanding of common Photonics applications. Students will develop an in-depth understanding of fiber optic communication and non-contact measurement photonic systems and acquire skills that have broad based industry relevance. Industry standard documentation and work place performance will be covered thoroughly. This course is built upon a comprehensive laboratory program that develops a practical intuition to complement conceptual understanding. Safety standards and procedures will be emphasized throughout the course to thoroughly familiarize the student with the proper photonics work environment.

    Prerequisites: LASR 201  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Measure and calculate coupler split ratio
    • Measure power and compare with power budget to assess performance of given fiber-optic systems
    • Determine dispersion characteristics of optical fibers
    • Use erbium-doped fiber amplifiers for signal regeneration
    • Install and use electro-optic (EO) and acousto-optic (AO) devices (e.g. Q-switching)
    • Use mechanical splices to join fibers
    • Interpret and implement general imaging requirements
    • Set up and align Mach-Zehnder interferometers
    • Perform setup and calibration of imaging systems
    • Measure wavefront aberrations
    • Perform digital image processing
    • Design and test photodetector circuits
    • Setup and describe basic focal plane array system (e.g. CCD’s)
    • Analyze and evaluate interferometric fringe patterns


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60

Engineering

  
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    ENGR 100 College Success in Engineering

    3 credits


    The primary goal of this course is to provide students with the resources needed to make an informed decision about future education and career goals and to make those goals reality. This course provides an orientation to the educational options and professional opportunities in engineering. Students will develop academic and personal skills and attitudes that promote success in college study.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Students should enroll in ENGR 100 in their first quarter of the Computer and Electrical Pre-Engineering, Associate in Science Transfer  or Mechanical, Civil, Aeronautical, Industrial, Materials Science Pre-Engineering, Associate in Science Transfer .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Develop goals for college study and identify strategies (including financial, time, stress and health management) to achieve them
    • Distinguish among different fields of engineering and engineering technology
    • Prepare an academic plan leading to an Associate degree and successful transfer in engineering
    • Outline the specific job opportunities and educational requirements in at least one field of engineering
    • Demonstrate attitudes and learning strategies that promote success in STEM study
    • Successfully navigate campus resources and services including the college website, learning management system, student financial services, and various student support services
    • Define, explore, and discuss the importance of diversity in today’s classroom and community


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
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    ENGR 110 Introduction to Engineering I: Modeling and Analysis

    5 credits
    A project-based introduction to engineering analysis, problem solving, and mathematical modeling. Working in teams, students will complete a series of hands-on projects designed to emphasize a systematic, analytical problem solving approach and explore the engineering disciplines at a technical level. Topics include: introductory engineering concepts; engineering for sustainability; teamwork skills; the application of mathematics, physics, and chemistry in engineering; unit systems; and an introduction to spreadsheet applications.

    Prerequisites: ENGR 100 MATH& 151 , and PHYS& 221  

    Corequisites: MATH& 152  and PHYS& 222  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use estimation to make order of magnitude calculations in the absence of data
    • Properly apply the rules for handling significant figures in arithmetic
    • Perform dimensional and unit analysis
    • Manipulate formulas to perform sensitivity analysis of systems in one or more variables
    • Prepare and interpret graphs following accepted standards in engineering and science
    • Perform introductory spreadsheet calculations such as cell-reference equations, descriptive statistics, and graphing
    • Demonstrate application of engineering problem solving processes
    • Describe elements of the engineering design process
    • Participate in developing functional project teams
    • Communicate technical information in a clear, concise, and accurate fashion through both written and oral presentation
    • Produce effective visual aids for oral presentations


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGR& 204 Electrical Circuits

    5 credits
    This course is an introduction to electrical engineering. Topics covered include basic circuit and systems concepts and resistors, sources, capacitors, inductors, and operational amplifiers. Students will solve first- and second-order linear differential equations associated with basic circuit forms.

    Prerequisites: PHYS& 222  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Solve electric circuits using node and mesh analysis
    • Apply Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems to circuit analysis
    • Articulate the basic laws of capacitors and inductors
    • Demonstrate the use of differential equations in the analysis of resistance-inductance-capacitance (RLC) circuits
    • Describe an ideal operational amplifier (op amp) and use it in circuits
    • Differentiate between applications using linear and nonlinear resistors and diodes
    • Solve first-order and second-order switched circuits
    • Analyze single-phase and three-phase sinusoidal steady state circuits


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ENGR& 214 Statics

    5 credits
    This course emphasizes the proper utilization of vector algebra and free body diagrams to solve problems in engineering statics through the use of Newton’s Laws.  Vectors are used to describe the action of forces and moments acting on particles and rigid bodies, which are fixed in space or undergoing uniform motion.  The six major areas of study are: vector algebra of forces and moments, free body diagrams and equilibria of particles and rigid bodies, centroids and centers of gravity, internal forces of trusses and frames, friction and applications to machines, and moments of inertia.

    Prerequisites: PHYS& 221  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Draw complete free body diagrams (FBD) and write appropriate equilibrium equations for the FBD, including support reactions
    • Solve equilibrium problems through the use of Newton’s Laws
    • Apply the concepts of equilibrium to various structures
    • Calculate moments, centers of mass, and forces for particular structures
    • Apply vector algebra principles to solving statics problems
    • Analyze and solve problems in statics through the logical application of the basic principles of classical mechanics


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ENGR& 215 Dynamics

    5 credits
    This course covers a vector treatment of kinematics and kinetics of particles in rectilinear and curvilinear motion followed by the study of rigid bodies in general plane motion. Newton’s Second Law along with the principles of work and energy, impulse and momentum, and conservation of energy will be applied to a large selection of problems dealing with the interactions of bodies and force systems.

    Prerequisites: ENGR& 214  and MATH 238  

    Corequisites: CHEM& 161  and MATH 220  

  
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    ENGR& 225 Mechanics of Materials

    5 credits
    This combined lecture-lab course provides engineering students with the fundamental principles and basic concepts used in the study of the engineering behavior of structures and mechanical members subjected to slowly applied or steady state loading conditions. The course will cover the basic relationships between axial, torsion, bending and shear loading acting on solid elements such as rods, shafts, columns and beams and their allowable stresses, strains and deformations. It will also cover Mohr’s circle of stresses and strains.

    Prerequisites: CHEM& 161 ENGR& 215 , and MATH 220  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply the knowledge of statics, properties of materials, and basic mathematics to analyze the stress-strain behavior of structural members subjected to slowly applied or steady state loads
    • Differentiate between various static loading conditions of simple structures and formulate progressive solutions to quantify their stress-strain behavior
    • Work individually and function as part of a team to
      • Analyze the stress-strain behavior of simple structural elements under combined loading conditions
      • Design simple beams to meet specific design needs
      • Effectively communicate the results of this work in coherent and legible calculations


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

English

  
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    ENGL 065 Spelling Improvement

    1-2 credits
    In this course students will work with an instructor to complete an independent self-study program designed to improve spelling proficiency. This course will help students sound out new words by applying basic phonic principles, provide practice in applying four basic spelling rules, and introduce techniques for memorizing words that are not spelled entirely by sound. Individual instruction and testing will be given on all the major rules and concepts in this course.

    Prerequisites: ASC instructor permission.

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use basic phonics rules and concepts
    • Understand and use visualization
    • Be familiar with basic spelling rules and conventions
    • Utilize a dictionary, spell-checker or computer to proofread work


    Total Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ENGL 067 Vocabulary Development

    1-3 credits
    In this course students will work with an instructor to complete an independent self-study program designed to increase their vocabulary. This course will help students learn new words through the application of basic learning principles, context cues, association, and inference. Vocabulary Development carefully leads the student from easier to harder words, exercises and quizzes. Individual instruction and testing will be provided throughout the course.

    Prerequisites: ASC instructor permission.

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon the successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use the dictionary to determine spelling, pronunciation, and definition of unknown words
    • Use basic learning principles to aid in their acquisition of new words
    • Be familiar with basic prefixes and roots and use this knowledge to determine meaning of words
    • Define words from context
    • Incorporate their new words into their speech and writing


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    ENGL 093 Beginning English

    5 credits
    Instruction in basic sentence grammar and the essentials of writing sentences and paragraphs; an introduction to essays. Review of study skills necessary for college success also provided.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and use fundamental grammar principles
    • Identify and use fundamental sentence structure principles
    • Identify and use fundamental punctuation principles
    • Develop proofreading skills
    • Develop paragraph-writing skills
    • Write brief messages, memos, and letters
    • Write brief summaries of material


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ENGL 095 Language Mechanics

    1 credits
    Covers language mechanics, including capitalization, grammar and usage, punctuation, and spelling.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score.

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Recognize correct subject-verb agreement
    • Recognize and properly use subjects, objects, pronouns, and pronoun agreement
    • Use periods, commas, apostrophes, colons, and semi-colons
    • Spell plural nouns and suffixes
    • Use silent letters
    • Capitalize letters, sentences, titles, and geographical locations


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ENGL 096 The Grammar of Writing

    1 credits
    Covers more advanced grammar and writing skills, including a review of language mechanics, plus proper language usage, sentence structure, and an introduction to clear writing and paragraphs.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 095  or equivalent placement score.

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use proper capitalization, punctuation, and spelling
    • Use all parts of speech and identify errors in their usage
    • Use proper sentence structure, and identify fragments, run-on sentences, and compound and complex sentences
    • Identify misplaced modifiers, wordiness, topic sentences, and transitions


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ENGL 097 Reading Comprehension

    1 credits
    Covers reading skills, including vocabulary building, word knowledge, and reading comprehension.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 095 , ENGL 096 , or equivalent placement score.

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify compound words, the roots of words, and Greek and Latin roots
    • Use words with multiple meanings, homonyms, synonyms, antonyms, and idioms
    • Identify main ideas, author bias, and techniques of persuasion in short passages


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ENGL 098 Textbook Reading

    2 credits
    This course is designed for students who want to improve their ability to follow directions and understand the materials they read for both technical and academic work at a college level. Students currently taking ENGL 099  or ENGL& 101  will find additional support for their reading improvement in this course.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 092 , and ENGL 093A  or ENGL 093B ; or equivalent placement score.

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use a variety of strategies to comprehend unfamiliar vocabulary
    • Identify the elements of a textbook or manual
    • Read and follow directions for tests, textbook activities, and technical procedures
    • Locate essential information in technical manuals and reports
    • Recognize main ideas and supporting details in passages
    • Summarize essential information
    • Relate supporting details to main idea
    • Formulate and ask questions related to text
    • Make predictions and hypotheses about text
    • Interpret information charts, graphs and instruments pertaining to discipline/program


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ENGL 099 Intro to Essay Writing

    5 credits
    This course presents grammar and paragraph review and instruction in writing thesis-driven essays. Students will write a minimum of 3500 words of finished composition during the quarter.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 092 , or ENGL 093A  or ENGL 093B , or ENGL 093 , or equivalent placement scores.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ENGL 335 Technical Writing for Designers

    5 credits


    Students will learn to convey written technical information in appropriate formats for various audiences. They will learn how to gather information, document sources, edit and format writing, and collaborate in order to produce effective technical communications. An emphasis will be placed on refining research skills.

    Prerequisites: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission.

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Analyze writing at the sentence and paragraph level in order to choose effective revision strategies
    • Produce writing that is correct, clear, professional, and stylistically effective
    • Use formatting and graphics to enhance the clarity of communication
    • Employ a wide range of editing skills to take writing through stages of revision
    • Produce writing appropriate to various technical situations, including online help, user manuals, technical manuals, training materials, business papers and reports
    • Research, integrate, and document information required for various technical projects
    • Produce writing that adheres to academic and professional ethical standards
    • Produce writing that communicates effectively to diverse, multicultural audiences
    • Work collaboratively to produce effective technical communication
    • Complete a technical writing project related to the student’s particular professional interests


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

  
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    ENGL& 101 English Composition I

    5 credits
    Advanced expository writing, reading and evaluating essays, and critical thinking are covered in this course that fulfills the written communication requirement for an AAS degree. Students will write a minimum of 5000 words of finished composition during the quarter.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 099  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Consistently apply the stages of the writing process to create finished compositions
    • Consistently exercise critical thinking skills to analyze and express ideas in writing
    • Analyze and evaluate the structural components of written texts
    • Draft and edit effectively structured essays to suit audience and purpose
    • Employ basic research and library skills to locate and evaluate information
    • Synthesize and cite sources using accepted documentation styles


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ENGL& 102 English Composition II

    5 credits


    Students learn to write fully documented research papers using critical thinking and reading skills. The class will emphasize logical argumentation from evidence and research skills necessary to collect relevant information. Students will write a minimum of 5000 words of finished composition during the quarter.

    Prerequisites: ENGL& 101 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Consistently demonstrate strong critical thinking skills in both reading and writing
    • Write college level compositions to suit audience and purpose
    • Apply the strategies of effective argument
    • Employ a range of research and library skills to locate and evaluate information
    • Write effective research documents that synthesize and cite sources using accepted documentation styles

     

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

  
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    ENGL& 111 Intro to Literature

    5 credits
    This course presents an overview of three important genres of literature: fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will learn and use critical skills to analyze and write about selected works in these genres.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 099  or equivalent placement score.

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • List the structural elements of the genres: poetry, drama, fiction
    • Apply a range of terms specific to the study of literature to works of fiction, poetry, or drama
    • Demonstrate critical-thinking skills when evaluating and analyzing a literary work
    • Apply one or more critical strategies in the interpretation of literary works
    • Explain the interrelationship between cultural and historical factors and literature
    • Employ synthesis to compare and contrast literary works and to incorporate research into writing
    • Apply the writing process when analyzing literature
    • List a range of significant past and current authors


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ENGL& 235 Technical Writing

    5 credits
    Students will learn to design, format, and produce documents common in business and industry. Emphasis will be placed on efficiently developing accurate, clear, concise, and visually accessible technical communication. Research techniques for technical writing will be introduced.

    Prerequisites: ENGL& 101  

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon the successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate critical thinking and clear, organized expression in documents and researched reports
    • Produce clear, concise, accurate and visually accessible documents for specified audiences
    • Apply research skills specific to industry-related information sources
    • Demonstrate professional standards in writing ethics, punctuality, and work production
    • Effectively address in written documents audiences diverse in culture and industrial specialties, as well as in professional interests and responsibilities


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

English as a Second Language

  
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    EASL 010 ESL Orientation

    1 credits


    This course is for students who took the ESL placement test and plan to enroll in the English as a Second Language program at Lake Washington Institute of Technology.

    Prerequisites: CASAS ESL appraisal and instructor’s permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain ESL placement  and class sequence and familiarize with the notion of certificates and degrees
    • Interpret and use vocabulary on LWIT forms such as registration, tuition waiver, release of information, etc.
    • Locate and use campus resources such as the Academic Skills Center, Library, bookstore, registration, financial aid, etc.
    • Identify community medical, legal, and other resources available to immigrants and refugees
    • Select realistic educational and professional goals
    • Complete the ESL transition electronic survey
    • Navigate the LWIT website and register on-line for ESL classes

     

    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10

  
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    EASL 015 Beginning ESL Literacy

    1-12 credits


    This course is for students beginning to study English as a second language. It teaches survival English, with a focus on speaking and listening.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     

    • Listening:
      • Understand the relationship between letters and sounds
      • Respond appropriately to simple questions, statements, and high frequency commands as part of simplified conversations
      • Master a few simple formulas to convey understanding and ask for repetition or clarification

     

    • Speaking:
      • Apply simple sentences and appropriate nonverbal behavior to express needs
      • Learn basic survival vocabulary to describe objects or report an activity
      • Use a limited set of learned words and phrases related to basic personal information and a limited number of activities in familiar and predictable communication tasks

     

    • Reading:
      • Demonstrate familiarity with concepts of letter names and sounds (individual consonants and vowels), and common vocabulary
      • Read and understand dates and time in general
      • Recognize everyday words or word groups in short, simple text and on personal information forms applying basic phonics rules

     

    • Writing:
      • Write upper/lower case letters legibly and appropriately using simple, everyday, highly familiar words (personal names, signatures, addresses)
      • Write numbers (dates, phones #s, prices) and simple phrases to convey information
      • Write simple sentences using the Simple Present and Present Continuous 


    Total Hours: 120 Lecture Hours: 120

  
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    EASL 016 Low Beginning ESL

    1-12 credits


    This course continues teaching basic functional English but has an increasing emphasis on beginning reading and writing.

    Prerequisites: EASL 015  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     

    • Listening:
      • Understand and respond to simple requests and to ask for repetition and clarification
      • Differentiate statements from questions based on grammar and intonation
      • Use sentences and appropriate non-verbal and visual clues to express needs
    • Speaking:
      • Use basic vocabulary and simple sentence structure to describe people or objects
      • Use a limited set of learned words, phrases, and short sentences related to basic personal information
      • Initiate and maintain simple conversations by applying such strategies as gestures, eye contact, and simple, repeated requests
    • Reading:
      • Read and understand schedules, calendars, and other data sources
      • Use context clues to decode and recognize familiar words in short, simple text by breaking words into parts
      • Read and understand U.S. measurement for weight, volume, distance, and temperature
      • Read short passages and identify the main idea and some details
    • Writing:
      • Fill out personal information and other forms accurately and neatly
      • Use everyday vocabulary to write a few related sentences on a single topic
      • Make simple edits of grammar, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation based on review and feedback from others


    Total Hours: 120 Lecture Hours: 120

  
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    EASL 024 Workplace Communications I

    1-8 credits
    This course is designed to improve workplace communication for beginning level ESL and ABE students. Topics will include beginning phonics and pronunciation, helpful reading techniques for the workplace, interpretation of safety procedures, general work procedures.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate placement test score.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Ask for, give, follow and clarify directions
    • Interpret and apply general work-related vocabulary
    • Interpret product label directions, warnings, danger signs, and symbols
    • Use content tables, indices, dictionaries
    • Identify safe work procedures


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 80
  
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    EASL 025 Workplace Communications II

    1-8 credits
    This course is designed to improve workplace communication for intermediate ESL and ABE students. Topics will include the interpretation of work-related vocabulary, safety procedures, handbooks, charts, performance reviews and benefits.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate placement test score.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Ask for, give, follow and clarify directions
    • Interpret general work-related vocabulary
    • Recognize and use occupational signs, charts, forms, and written directions
    • Interpret job responsibilities and performance reviews
    • Interpret employee handbooks, work safety manuals, and related publications
    • Identify safe work procedures
    • Interpret wages, deductions, and benefits
    • Participate in meetings


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 80
  
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    EASL 030 High Beginning ESL

    1-15 credits


    In this course students will practice and improve communication skills with an equal emphasis on listening, speaking, reading and writing.

    Prerequisites: EASL 016  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     

    • Listening
      • Distinguish voice patterns for questions, statements and imperatives
      • Understand and respond to conversations, instructions, and narratives in the form of basic connected discourse on familiar topics related to personal background/needs and everyday tasks
      • Apply background knowledge to understand the intent of the speaker
    • Speaking
      • Use vocabulary related to common/everyday topics or personal experience  and basic sentence structure in familiar/predictable communication tasks
      • Use simple strategies (such as making and responding requests for feedback repetition, and rephrasing) to meet the speaking purpose
    • Reading
      • Demonstrate familiarity with simple, everyday knowledge and vocabulary
      • Read simple stories and understand main messages
      • Use various strategies such as restating and rephrasing text, and use a simplified dictionary
    • Writing
      • Complete information on forms
      • Use familiar vocabulary and simple sentence structure to produce several sentences on a topic
      • Make simple edits of grammar, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation


    Total Hours: 150 Lecture Hours: 150

  
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    EASL 040 Low Intermediate ESL

    1-15 credits


    Students continue improving their communication skills with an emphasis on reading and writing to enhance their participation in the community and on the job.

    Prerequisites: EASL 030  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     

    • Reading
      • Locate important information in short to medium-length texts; skim and scan for main ideas and details
      • Infer meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary by drawing on content knowledge and using contextual clues
      • Read and interpret charts, graphs, or maps
    • Writing
      • Write simple and compound sentences with appropriate punctuation and capitalization.
      • Use familiar vocabulary and basic text structure to write a single paragraph to convey an idea with supporting details and/or examples.
      • Make edits of grammar (simple verb tenses), spelling, and sentence structure
    • Speaking
      • Discuss and exchange opinions
      • Discuss personal/employment background
      • Use high-frequency vocabulary, knowledge of basic grammar, and sentence structure in familiar communicative tasks and short presentations
    • Listening
      • Understand and respond to conversations, explanations, instructions, and short narratives of a somewhat complex nature but related to familiar tasks and situations
      • Apply linguistic and background knowledge and strategies  (by taking notes and summarizing main points to understand the main intent and details communicated by speaker)


    Total Hours: 150 Lecture Hours: 150

  
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    EASL 042 ESL Writing Fundamentals

    1-9 credits
    Teaches organization/other aspects of the writing process integrated with grammar, reading, and critical thinking skills.

    Prerequisites: EASL 030  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify paragraph parts and organize paragraphs effectively
    • Write extended paragraphs with the following methods of development: narration, description, process, cause/effect, contrast, and persuasion
    • Use pre-writing techniques and understand the basics of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, editing, and revising
    • Demonstrate familiarity with the most common spelling rules
    • Understand common prefixes, roots, and suffixes and use this knowledge to create new words and infer meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary
    • Identify and use correctly the main grammatical structures taught in EASL 030 and 040.
    • Skim, scan, predict, and understand patterns of organization within a text
    • Read timed readings and answer comprehension questions and/or summarize


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 90
  
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    EASL 050 High Intermediate ESL

    1-15 credits


    Students will practice and improve communication skills to function effectively in various life situations and to explore program opportunities.

    Prerequisites: EASL 040  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     

    • Reading
      • Recognize unfamiliar and some specialized words by breaking words into parts and using contextual clues           
      • Monitor and enhance comprehension by recognizing key words and posing and answering questions 
      • Organize information using some strategies, such as recall, restatement, simple sequencing and simple categorization
    • Writing
      • Write a simple narrative, informative, or expressive paragraph
      • Use strategies to identify, brainstorm and organize ideas to support a single purpose such as to convey personal experience, meet a specific need or respond to recent learning
      • Make edits of grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage and text structure
    • Listening
      • Understand and respond appropriately to extended explanations and narratives, detailed instructions and complex conversations
      • Use a wide range of strategies effectively to repair gaps in understanding and give feedback
      • Apply linguistic, socio-cultural, and other background knowledge and strategies to understand the intent of the speaker
    • Speaking
      • Use basic grammar and a variety of sentence types in a range of somewhat unfamiliar or unpredictable communication tasks
      • Elaborate with some detail and examples and select the most important information to relay
      • Recall and use sufficient oral vocabulary related to personal experience and everyday activities, some idioms


    Total Hours: 150 Lecture Hours: 150

  
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    EASL 053 Healthcare Bridge I

    6 credits


    This course is designed to assist ESL students in their transition into Allied Health Programs, by offering language instruction in the context of Health/ Healthcare.

    Prerequisites: Completion of level 4 or equivalent placement scores and interest in one of the Allied Health Programs at LWTech.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate familiarity with key A&P concepts (body makeup and systems, etc) and master basic vocabulary (in terms of spelling, pronunciation and word use) related to Health/Healthcare
    • Apply basic reading comprehension skills (skimming, scanning, and breaking down larger phrases) to authentic reading selections used in Allied Health Programs; read timed readings and answer comprehension questions and/or summarize
    • Identify the three basic component parts of a word and apply word building rules to infer meaning of basic health/medical terminology
    • Differentiate among verb tenses, use Passive Voice (basics tenses) correctly, form the plural of medical nouns, and use adjectives to compare
    • Write an extended paragraph with the following methods of development: narration, description, cause/effect, and process analysis
    • Use simple sentence combining techniques to write paragraphs/case studies
    • Set realistic goals, keep a reading log, and keep track of wpm, and improve test-taking skills
    • Identify class sequence and campus contact for desired program
    • Plan a visit of at least one hour to a relevant college class, interview the instructor and/or a student in the class, and prepare a report based on the interview and observation
    • Plan a project with a classmate to present to the class on topics of intercultural issues in healthcare (involves contact with native speakers)
    • Use a CD and a floppy disk, create and save a document, and use bars, buttons, and icons; become familiar with basic word-processing skills and improve typing speed; access relevant web pages

     

    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 60

  
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    EASL 057 ESL Writing High/Intermediate

    3 credits
    This online class improves reading and writing skills through learning and practicing new grammar and writing topics. Assignments are based on online reading texts.

    Prerequisites: EASL 040  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the form, meaning, and use of different verb tenses, the passive voice, modal verbs, and gerunds and infinitives
    • Write clear sentences in paragraphs missing topic sentences, supporting sentences, and concluding sentences
    • Understand the meaning and use of different transitional words and phrases
    • Apply the new grammar knowledge in writing sentences and paragraphs correctly
    • Develop ideas into final paragraphs based on online readings


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    EASL 060 Connect With English

    1 credits
    In this independent-study course, students will practice listening and writing skills, and some basic grammatical structures to complement or prepare for regular ESL classes.

    Prerequisites: EASL 030  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Total Hours: 22 Lab or Clinical Hours: 22
  
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    EASL 062 Writing Improvement

    1 credits
    This independent-study class is intended for intermediate ESL learners. Students will work on their writing at the sentence level and then at the paragraph level, while reviewing and practicing grammatical structures and relationships.

    Prerequisites: EASL 030  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Total Hours: 22 Lab or Clinical Hours: 22
  
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    EASL 064 ESL Workskills

    1 credits
    This is an independent-study course designed to improve the language skills necessary to function well in an American workplace setting.

    Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in EASL 030  or EASL 040  or current employment.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    EASL 065 Advanced ESL

    1-15 credits


    In this course, students will continue improving communication skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing to prepare them for transitioning into college programs.

    Prerequisites: EASL 050  or equivalent placement.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     

    • Reading
      • Locate important information, read identified sections for detail and determine missing information
      • Monitor and enhance comprehension using skimming and scanning and question formation techniques
      • Organize and analyze information and reflect upon its meaning using classification, categorization and comparison/contrast
    • Writing
      • Write compound and complex sentences in one-two paragraph texts with few errors
      • Make revisions for clarity and organization and edits for grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and language usage
      • Use familiar and specialized vocabulary including abstract nouns and idioms
    • Listening
      • Understand main ideas in conversations, short lectures, and extended explanations
      • Ask questions for further understanding and to give feedback appropriate to the situation
      • Apply linguistic, socio-cultural, and other background knowledge and strategies to fully understand the intent of the speaker
    • Speaking
      • Use a variety of complex sentence structures in a range of unfamiliar, unpredictable and uncomfortable interactions
      • Employ appropriate strategies to select, organize and relay information
      • Recall and use vocabulary related to daily activities, school, work and social situations


    Total Hours: 150 Lecture Hours: 150


Environmental Science

  
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    ENVS 321 Environmental Health

    5 credits
    This course investigates the role of the environment in personal, community, and global health. This course investigates current environmental public health issues and topics in environmental health sciences as well as global health threats such as climate change, pollution, food supply issues, etc. This course includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Analyze the role that environmental policy and regulation has on mitigating health risks
    • Investigate major sources and types of environmental agents and the role they play in health outcomes
    • Identify and define the steps in the risk-assessment and risk-management processes
    • Define toxicology and identify issues surrounding human exposure to chemical toxicants
    • Examine the role of water and air in human health issues and outcomes
    • Identify the role of food safety and food quality on human health outcomes
    • Identify current issues and topics in environmental health
    • Compare peer-reviewed research with popular accounts of environmental health issues and concerns


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ENVS& 101 Introduction to Environmental Science

    5 credits
    Discusses the effects of human activity on changing ecosystems, energy flow, sustainability, pollution, and natural cycles. Content also deals with water and wastewater treatments, air pollution, and solid waste treatment and disposal technologies. Includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093 , MATH 090  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss the natural cycles of an ecosystem
    • Explain the natural flow of energy and associated ecosystems and their sustainability
    • Discuss changes to ecosystems due to human activity 
    • Identify common constituents of surface water, groundwater, and domestic wastewater
    • Apply concepts and principles of sustainable development as it relates to wastewater treatment, dissolved oxygen, and landfill space
    • Identify environmental issues that relate to different cultures and countries


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    STEC 351 Principles of Sustainability

    5 credits
    Introduces the influence of human activities on environmental processes. Topics include ecological concepts, population growth, natural resources, and current environmental problems from scientific, social, political, and economic perspectives. Students demonstrate an understanding of environmental interrelationships and contemporary global environmental issues as related to sustainable design practices.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BTAD Program and any college-level lab science

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Identify environmental issues in different cultures and countries
    • Analyze the impact of air and water pollution on the climate and on human beings, and evaluate measures to reduce pollution
    • Measure factors that affect environmental sustainability such as air and water quality
    • Interpret labels, MSDS and symbols common to hazardous materials/waste
    • Analyze the characteristics of populations, and assess environmental impacts of human population growth, including urbanization worldwide
    • Evaluate modern agricultural techniques, pesticide use, and their impact on food and water supply, and discuss water conservation methods
    • Analyze the impact of air and water pollution on the climate and human beings, and evaluate the role of sustainable design practices in mitigation
    • Explain the importance of energy consumption and the use of fossil fuels and waste management methods, and analyze their environmental impact
    • Examine the importance of local, national, and international policies that aim to protect the environment
    • Investigate current green practices implemented in graphic, industrial, and architectural design projects across the globe
    • Create a design project that integrates components of sustainability and environmental impact


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

First Aid/CPR

  
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    IFAD 156 8-Hour First Aid/CPR

    0.5 credits
    Designed for people in office settings (e.g. banking, retail sales and computer operators) within 4-6 minutes of emergency health services. First Aid and CPR certification valid for two years. Text required, review prior to start. Course covers basic first aid and CPR instruction.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply skills of CPR/AED and First Aid
    • Course completion cards in CPR and FA meet Washington State Labor and Industries workplace safety requirement for 2 years
    • Prepare participants to respond correctly in emergency situations


  
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    IFAD 158 CPR For the Healthcare Provider

    0.5 credits
    CPR certification meets AHA guidelines for healthcare providers. Course specifically designed for individuals in the medical or dental fields, and students in the college pre-professional programs. Text required, review prior to start of course.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • American Heart Association Provider CPR class completion cards are recognized by Washington State Labor and Industries in the work place for two years
    • Understand and apply skills of CPR
    • Prepare participants to respond correctly in emergency situations


    Total Hours: 4 Lecture Hours: 4
  
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    IFAD 161 12-Hour First Aid/CPR/Daycare and Foster Care

    1 credits
    Meets Washington State Department of Social and Health Services requirements for day or foster care licensing; also recommended for adults who participate in activities involving children. Program includes accident safety and prevention, infant and child care, obstructed airway management and first aid. First aid certification valid for two years; CPR certification valid for two years. Review text prior to the start of class.

    Total Hours: 12 Lecture Hours: 12
  
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    IFAD 162 First Aid/CPR for Health Care Providers

    1 credits
    Includes adult, child and infant skills in airway management and CPR; Bag Valve Mask Resuscitation practical exercises, AED awareness and familiarization, and first aid. First aid certification valid for two years; CPR certification meets AHA guidelines for healthcare providers; recommended renewal is one year. Course is designed for students in allied health programs. Review text prior to the start of class.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR and First Aid class completion cards are recognized by Washington State Labor and Industries in the workplace for 2 yrs
    • Prepare participants to respond correctly in emergency situations
    • Apply skills of CPR and First Aid


  
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    IFAD 216 HIV/AIDS Training

    1 credits
    Overview of AIDS including concepts of immunity and related diseases. Meets Washington state seven-hour minimum requirement for healthcare workers. Participants will be given a certificate of training upon completion of course requirements.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • State the cause of AIDS
    • Describe the functioning of the normal immune system
    • State the diseases associated with AIDS
    • State current therapies for the syndrome
    • Inform patients on the importance of  AIDS education in the global prevention of AIDS
    • Describe risk factors associated with the disease


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10

Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer

  
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    FTNS 100 Independent Personal Fitness Training

    1


    Students will independently acquire the knowledge, skill, and ability to rationalize and apply integrated training progressions for safe and effective activities of daily living/wellness, recreation, fitness, or sport participation.

    This class is repeatable for credit.

    Integrated training incorporates all forms of training (flexibility, cardiorespiratory, core, balance, and resistance) as part of a progressive system designed for low to moderate intensity - group circuit training. Integrated independent personal fitness training optimizes functional performance while decreasing predispositions to acute and chronic injuries during the pursuit of wellness, recreation, or sport.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the knowledge, skill, and ability to rationalize and apply integrated training concepts
    • Differentiate between beginning, intermediate, and advanced progressions of flexibility, cardiorespiratory, core, balance, and resistance training
    • Demonstrate a documented physical transformation towards optimal functional performance
    • Demonstrate documented decreased predispositions to acute and chronic injuries


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    FTNS 112 Principles of Sports and Exercise

    3 credits
    This course is an introduction to the discipline of exercise science. The class will examine all aspects associated with the personal training and exercise industry, and is an introduction to the fitness specialist program.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher)

    Corequisites: FTNS 121  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define exercise physiology and discuss the importance of the field
    • Describe and critically review the latest research in exercise physiology
    • Distinguish between exercise programs that are appropriate for attainment of health related fitness goals and programs designed to maximize performance
    • Describe the different principles and components of exercise
    • Explain the education and practical experiences required to become a fitness professional
    • Explain biological control systems, bioenergetics, exercise metabolism, and the basic effects of endurance and strength training on various organ systems


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    FTNS 118 Health Promotion and Wellness

    5 credits


    This course addresses strategies for improving the state of wellness through healthier lifestyles. Topics include: behavioral intervention, lifestyle changes, maintaining a healthy lifestyle, stress management, health-related fitness, and the implication for a fitness program design.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 112  and FTNS 121  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe challenges to healthy lifestyles among different cultures
    • Describe the basic psychology associated with wellness and behavior change
    • Explain the negative effects of stress, pain, and depression
    • Explain the difference between exercise in pursuit of fitness or wellness
    • Develop an exercise program designed to improve health and wellness
    • Explain the need for and economics of worksite health promotion
    • As a committee member, organize and coordinate wellness events designed to reach business and industry employees


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

  
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    FTNS 120 Responding to Emergencies

    3 credits
    The course provides fitness specialists with basic first aid, CPR skills, as well as knowledge to care for athletic injuries. All students will receive American Red Cross certifications upon successful completion.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Recognize and handle an emergency, check the scene for safety, and assess the state of the victim
    • Provide 1st responder care for life-threatening conditions or sudden illnesses
    • Recognize the signals of a heart attack and how to give care
    • Care for and prioritize injuries for various first aid situations


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    FTNS 121 Kinesiology

    5 credits
    A study of the structure and function of the skeletal and muscular systems of the human body, including origins, insertions, and actions of the muscles and an understanding the mechanical qualities of movement.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher)

    Corequisites: FTNS 112  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the bones involved in movement during exercise
    • Classify articulations based on structure and function
    • Describe the connective tissues associated with articulations and movement
    • Identify the muscles, including origins, insertions, and actions, involved in movement during exercise


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    FTNS 124 Functional Assessment and Corrective Exercise

    4 credits
    Students are introduced to techniques used to improve stabilization, endurance, and functional strength. In addition, students will design integrated programs to improve overall work capacity, enhance joint stabilization, and increase lean body mass.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 112  and FTNS 121  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize innovative education tools and techniques from the National Academy of Sports Medicine to achieve optimal results for functional fitness
    • Apply scientific rationale, research, and the practical skills necessary to perform functional assessments, create individualized corrective exercise programs, and help clients progress to their goals
    • Explain the components and function of an integrated fitness assessment and how it relates to human movement/performance
    • Perform and instruct appropriate flexibility, core-training, and balance-training techniques  


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    FTNS 126 Sport and Exercise Psychology

    3 credits
    Course examines psychological theories and research related to sport and exercise behavior.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 112 .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe how psychological factors influence involvement and performance in sport, exercise, and physical education settings
    • Describe how participation in sport, exercise, and physical education influences the psychological makeup of the individuals involved
    • Describe the use of mental skills training to improve performance in the exercise setting


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    FTNS 128 Introduction to Athletic Training

    3 credits
    This is an introductory course for the personal trainer dealing with the recognition, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries related to sports and fitness. Topics include risk management, injury prevention, basic sports/exercise trauma, and management of emergency procedures.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 121 .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the role of the athletic trainer
    • Explain emergency procedures associated with sports injuries
    • Explain the mechanisms and characteristics of sports trauma
    • Describe tissue response to injury and therapeutic modalities utilized to assist in rehabilitation
    • Describe different sports/fitness injuries by region: foot, ankle, knee, thigh, hip, groin, pelvis, shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, spine, thorax, abdomen, and skin


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    FTNS 137 Professional Skills in Fitness

    5 credits
    This course examines the skills and behaviors necessary for success in the fitness industry. Topics include work habits, ethics, teamwork, communication, diversity, customer service, sales, and job preparation.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Communicate in a professional manner with clients during fitness sessions
    • Describe the education and practical experiences required to become a fitness professional
    • Describe the education-based approach to personal training
    • Provide professional customer service in the fitness industry
    • Effectively prepare for a job interview in the fitness industry
    • Utilize computer applications to professionally maintain client data 
    • Describe pertinent ethical issues in the fitness industry
    • Develop professional networks within the fitness industry


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    FTNS 142 Certification Review Lab

    2 credits
    This course offers preparation for certifications offered by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), the American Council on Exercise (ACE), and the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA).

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe safe and effective methods of exercise by applying the fundamental principles of exercise science
    • Write appropriate exercise prescriptions
    • Identify motivational techniques to assist  individuals with initiation and maintenance of healthy behaviors
    • Identify areas of risk and the necessary management of risk in the fitness industry
    • Identify errors in exercise performance and techniques


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    FTNS 144 Nutrition for Sports Performance

    3 credits
    This course examines nutrition in relation to athletic performance.

    Prerequisites: NUTR& 101 .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify energy sources for muscle metabolism
    • Describe the nutritional needs of athletes
    • Identify the nutritional concerns of female athletes
    • Identify dietary strategies designed to enhance performance
    • Evaluate the role of ergogenic aids in athletic performance


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    FTNS 152 Exercise Physiology

    5 credits
    This course focuses on alterations in body systems and organs during physical activity with an emphasis on energy producing systems. Students examine adaptations to the cardiorespiratory and muscular systems during exercise.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 112 , FTNS 121 , and BIOL& 160  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain acute responses and chronic adaptations to exercise by various body systems
    • Describe and critically review the latest research in exercise physiology pertaining to cardiovascular and muscular adaptations associated with exercise
    • Explain the processes underlying force generation by skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue
    • Explain the mechanisms of action of the cardiovascular system in oxygen and carbon dioxide transport at rest and during exercise
    • Explain the mechanism of action of the respiratory system for gas exchange at rest and during exercise
    • Explain the acid-base balance in the body during exercise
    • Explain the body’s response and adaptation to exercise under varying environmental conditions, e.g. heat stress, altitude, etc
    • Explain gender and chronological age differences in responses or adaptations to exercise
    • Explain the role of nutrition and body composition as it relates to exercise performance and health


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    FTNS 153 Clinical Fitness Assessment

    2 credits
    This course introduces students to clinical fitness testing. Students conduct a systematic assessment to obtain objective and subjective client information.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 152 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Effectively perform objective and subjective fitness assessments
    • Critically review literature to determine reliability and validity of testing measurements
    • Conduct a variety of exercise tests for the different components of fitness
    • Screen individuals according to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines
    • Utilize computer software to analyze data obtained during fitness testing


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    FTNS 154 Exercise Prescription for Special Populations

    5 credits
    Students are introduced to conditions, dysfunctions, and diseases common in special populations, such as arthritis, diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. Also covered are the effects of these conditions on clientele and training variables and how to alter program design for clients with these various conditions.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 152  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define conditions, dysfunctions and diseases common in special populations of fitness clients
    • Describe how these conditions affect the acute training variables within an exercise program
    • Screen individuals and stratify their risk according to the guidelines set by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)
    • Alter program design for clients with various conditions


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    FTNS 170 Group Exercise Instruction

    4 credits
    This class will provide the student with the fundamental knowledge and instructional techniques to lead group fitness classes. Components that make up an organized and safe class, such as proper technique, music cueing, and choreography are covered. Studio time for practical skill acquisition is included.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify critical components of designing a group exercise class
    • Describe the proper use of rhythm and music selection in a group exercise setting
    • Explain and utilize a variety of teaching techniques, styles and strategies
    • Explain and utilize specific techniques in the areas of goal setting, maintaining concentration, and relaxation
    • Create a variety of group exercise routines


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    FTNS 191 Fitness Internship I

    3 credits
    This course prepares the student to be an employee in a health, fitness, or recreational facility. Students observe certified industry professionals at health, fitness, recreational, or therapeutic facilities and learn the daily operational duties associated with a fitness center.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 112 , FTNS 121 BIOL& 160 , and instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the daily operational aspects of a fitness facility
    • Collaborate with fitness professionals and fellow employees to perform daily tasks in a fitness center
    • Explain and implement emergency procedures at a fitness center
    • List a variety of exercises used in designing exercise programs


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    FTNS 210 Fitness Internship II - Personal Training

    3 credits
    This course provides an opportunity for students to gain the skills necessary to become a personal trainer through 44 hours of supervised personal training in the LWIT Fitness Center.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 191  and CPR/First Aid Certification

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the knowledge, skills, and abilities required for entry level personal training
    • Design and implement safe and efficient exercise prescriptions for individual clients
    • Motivate, coach, and instruct clients to transform their functional capacity during activities of daily living and sport and recreation


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    FTNS 213 Exercise and Stress Management

    4 credits
    The focus of this class is to provide the student with the principles and methods relevant to understanding how chronic stress impacts the human body and the role stress plays in overall health and well-being. Students will gain an understanding of various means of stress reduction and relaxation methods commonly used to help individuals better manage stress. Various lifestyle changes that can be used to improve health outcomes and ways those can be applied in everyday life will also be discussed.

    Prerequisites: Minimum ABED 040  and ABED 046  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Examine the physiological response to stress.
    • Analyze the impact stress has on physical health.
    • Evaluate and apply techniques and strategies for stress management.
    • Evaluate the role of health behaviors on stress prevention and management.
    • Apply an understanding of the relationship that stress management plays in overall wellness.
    • Create client centered programs based on the relationship between exercise, nutrition, and stress.


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    FTNS 214 Sport and American Culture

    4 credits
    This class will focus on issues that relate to sport and its influence on culture in the U.S. Students will examine how sport has become so prominent in American culture, how sport influences individual lives, and the role sport plays in society. This is an opportunity to gain a historical perspective while examining more closely the inter-relationship between sport and culture in present-day America, exploring historical and present-day issues from economic, social and cultural perspectives.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093   or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe how interest in sport affects individual choices  
    • Evaluate how interest in sport is affected by age, income, geography, gender, ethnicity, etc.
    • Analyze the role sport has played in shaping society
    • Explore the ability of sport to both bring groups together in a positive way and separate people in a negative way
    • Evaluate the reciprocal relationship between sport and American culture, both historically and in the present
    • Apply an understanding of sport and American culture as it relates to working with individuals and/or clients


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    FTNS 215 Business and Risk Management in Fitness

    5 credits
    This course examines business practices, safety, liability, and negligence in the fitness industry.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and explain crucial business concepts, including purchasing, contractual agreements, risk management and negligence, technology issues, and other fiscal concerns as they relate to the fitness industry
    • Explain ethical business issues in the fitness industry
    • Define safety, liability, and negligence as they apply to the fitness industry
    • Explain legal aspects of personal training
    • Create a fitness business plan
    • Create a framework for creating risk management documents for a fitness program


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    FTNS 216 Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Chronic Disease

    4 credits
    The focus of this class is to provide the student with the basic concepts surrounding the role nutrition and physical activity play in the prevention and maintenance of various chronic diseases. Basic physiological mechanisms of chronic disease states will be discussed in conjunction with the impact dietary and exercise behaviors either support or mitigate those physiological mechanisms. 

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 160 NUTR& 101 , and FTNS 152  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Analyze the physiological basis of various prevalent chronic diseases
    • Evaluate the impact and role of nutrition and exercise on chronic disease management and prevention
    • Explore the historical and evolutionary context of various chronic disease states
    • Evaluate the role lifestyle choices play in overall health and wellbeing


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    FTNS 218 Human Performance I Cardio & Respiratory Systems

    4 credits
    This course examines the adaptations of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems to aerobic and anaerobic training modalities. Acute and chronic adaptations as a result of sub-maximal, maximal, and resistance training programs will be explored in depth.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 112 , FTNS 121 , and BIOL& 160  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe cardiovascular and respiratory physiological adaptations that occur during sub-maximal and maximal exercise following acute and chronic training
    • Identify the differences between adaptations to aerobic and anaerobic training
    • Describe the benefits of training on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems
    • Explain the use of heart-rate as a method for training


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    FTNS 219 Human Performance II Strength Training

    4 credits
    This course examines the scientific principles of resistance training and various resistance training techniques used to enhance muscular fitness. Strategies for designing and implementing resistance training programs are included.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 218  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe various resistance training programs
    • Define the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) minimal recommendations for weight/resistance training
    • Demonstrate proper exercise techniques for resistance training activities
    • Describe adaptations to various forms of resistance training
    • Explain the concept of periodization
    • Design an appropriate conditioning program for a designated client


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    FTNS 220 Human Performance III Adv Training Strategies

    4 credits
    In the final of the three-part series, students will explore the concept of power using maximum strength training, hypertrophy strength training, and reactive training. Included are speed, agility and quickness training.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 219  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe scientifically-valid, evidence-based applications that achieve efficient and effective results with a wide spectrum of athletic skill and ability
    • Explain the importance of reactive training and SAQ training
    • Perform, describe, and teach various reactive-training and SAQ exercises
    • Design effective reactive-training and SAQ programs for fitness clients 


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    FTNS 230 Fitness Externship

    4 credits
    The Fitness Externship provides an opportunity for students to work in a health, fitness, recreational, or therapeutic facility of interest to the student. The focus of this course is on leadership and the student’s ability to integrate delivery of training with teamwork.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 210  

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the knowledge, skill, abilities, and talents required for an entry level personal trainer
    • Design and implement an integrated medical-performance training model for multiple clients with various knowledge, skill, and abilities
    • Motivate, coach, and direct  clients towards  functional transformation while optimizing their ability to perform activities of daily living, recreation, and athletics


    Total Hours: 120 Practicum or Internship Hours: 120

Funeral Service Education

  
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    FSE 101 Introduction and History of Funeral Service

    3 credits
    This course is a survey of the history of funeral service. Emphasis is placed on individuals and events which influenced contemporary funeral principles and practices.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175 , BUS& 201 , ENGL& 101 , and MATH& 107  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Recognize the historical roots of some contemporary funeral service practices
    • Describe the evolution of funeral merchandise, funeral transportation, and funeral homes
    • Appreciate and explain the development of current embalming practices
    • Describe the development of funeral service education
    • Explain the importance of developing inter-professional relationships and responsibilities within the funeral service community
    • Compare and contrast the history of funeral service to modern day practices
    • Identify and properly use professional vocabulary


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    FSE 105 Chemistry Concepts

    5 credits
    This course is intended for non-science majors. The focus is on fundamental topics of chemistry such as atoms and molecules, the periodic table, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and radioactivity as they relate to current society. This class is intended to increase scientific literacy for non-science majors. It presents chemistry using a more conceptual and less mathematical approach.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175 , BUS& 201 , ENGL& 101 , and MATH& 107 

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the key elements of the scientific method as applied to chemistry
    • Describe the general structure of the atom and identify characteristics of an element using the periodic table, including element symbol, atomic number, atomic mass, and number of protons and electrons
    • Apply chemistry principles to daily life using examples such as acid rain, photosynthesis, cooking, industrial synthesis, and pharmaceuticals, and identify the role of chemical reactions in those applications
    • Differentiate between molecular, ionic, and metallic substances
    • Explain the characteristics of a solid, liquid, and gas in terms of visible properties and the kinetic-molecular theory of matter
    • Express concentrations of solutions qualitatively and quantitatively
    • Calculate pH and identify chemicals as acids or bases
    • Identify basic organic functional groups and describe their physical and chemical characteristics
    • Identify and use authoritative reference materials to research and report on chemistry-related topics


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    FSE 130 Funeral Service Sociology and Psychology

    4 credits
    This course is a survey of the basic principles of sociology, psychology and counseling as they relate to funeral service. Especially stressed are family structures, social structures, grief, bereavement, mourning and crisis intervention with particular emphasis on the role of the funeral director.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175 , BUS& 201 , ENGL& 101 , and MATH& 107  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the application and role of sociology and psychology in funeral service
    • Describe the cultural requirements and cultural diversities of each family the funeral director is privileged to serve
    • Identify the family governing systems found in our society
    • Describe theories of grief
    • Explain how grief affects various family structures
    • Describe issues relating to children and death
    • Identify and empathize with the different types of family structures
    • Recognize the changing social factors which affect funeral rites and the families that are served by the funeral directors
    • Recognize the role of the deceased in the family structure and the effect of the death on that family’s structure
    • Differentiate between grief counseling and grief therapy
    • Recognize when to make referrals to appropriate community resources


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    FSE 140 Funeral Directing

    4 credits
    This course covers general funeral service practice, such as notification of death, transfer of remains, and conduct of the arrangement conference.

    Prerequisites: FSE 101 , FSE 130 , and FSE 141  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and define the primary responsibilities of the funeral director
    • List and describe the timeframes in which the services of the funeral director are typically provided (i.e. pre-need, at-need, and post funeral follow up)
    • Describe and apply proper telephone procedures
    • Transfer human remains from the place of death to the funeral home using generally accepted procedures and equipment
    • Communicate effectively when meeting with a family in the arrangement conference
    • Identify and describe various American religious funeral customs
    • Describe fraternal and military funeral procedures
    • Provide information about prefunded/preplanned funerals to client families
    • Describe basic expectations for the shipping of human remains
    • Properly use specific vocabulary associated with funeral service
    • Name and explain terminology and considerations unique to cremation arrangements
    • Develop and defend a first call/information sheet


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    FSE 141 Funeral Service Ethics

    2 credits
    This course strives to develop within the funeral service student a sense of morality, which will guide his/her decisions and actions in proper treatment of the deceased and professional service to the bereaved.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175 , BUS& 201 , ENGL& 101 , and MATH& 107  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Define ethics
    • Distinguish between legal and ethical issues
    • Apply a standard of ethical behavior in personal and professional conduct
    • Demonstrate an understanding of terms associated with ethical issues and practices
    • Differentiate between ethical, legal, and moral business operations
    • Communicate with families, other professionals, and the public about sensitive or difficult information


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    FSE 148 Funeral Service Law and Compliance

    3 credits
    This course is designed to familiarize the student with state and federal laws which govern funeral service, including the Federal Trade Commission Funeral Rule.

    Prerequisites: BUS& 201  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Define the purpose of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and describe its effect on funeral service
    • Identify who must comply with the FTC Funeral Industry Practices Rule and explain how to comply with the rule
    • Follow the FTC Funeral Industry Practices Rule regarding specific price disclosures
    • Describe what misrepresentations are prohibited by the FTC Funeral Industry Practices Rule
    • Identify legal relationships, rights, duties and liabilities between the funeral director and/or embalmer, the dead body and the consumer
    • Demonstrate an understanding of  legal issues in order to avoid liability
    • Identify the laws, rules and regulations affecting funeral service
    • Identify the various documents requiring preparation in funeral service
    • Recognize situations when legal and other professional services are required for death planning and estate administration


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    FSE 250 Funeral Service Management and Merchandising

    4 credits
    This course examines the daily operations management of a funeral home. Each area of the business is addressed, including human capital management, vendor relations, and finance.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 111 , BTE 101 , BUSA 180 , BUS& 201 , FSE 101 , FSE 130 , and FSE 140  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of operational procedures specific to funeral service
    • Explain procedures related to disaster management
    • Research business and operational trends in funeral service
    • Write an employee handbook for the funeral profession
    • Recognize and explain the importance of a formal purchasing program
    • Communicate  knowledgeably about funeral merchandise with colleagues, sales representatives and the public
    • Identify the component parts of funeral merchandise, including materials used, styles, finishes, dimensions and functions
    • Demonstrate conceptual and practical knowledge of factors and strategies for determining the firm’s product mix
    • Differentiate between methods of price determination and price quotation


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    FSE 251 Embalming I

    3 credits
    This course includes the study of the phenomenon of death in the human body, government regulations applicable to the embalming process, and embalming analysis, reports, and instrumentation.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175  and FSE 101  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain how the handling, treatment and disposition of the dead human body meet the sociological, psychological, theological, physical and legal requirements of family and community
    • Identify the causes and manners of death whereby notification of death to public officials is required
    • Use appropriate terminology to facilitate communication with members of allied professions and the public
    • Apply adequate methods of personal and environmental protection against communicable and infectious diseases and hazardous chemicals
    • Cooperate with professional agencies regarding the dead human body
    • Identify and document body conditions, embalming techniques and procedures performed in written embalming report


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    FSE 255 Embalming Chemistry

    3 credits
    This is a survey of the basic principles of chemistry as they relate to funeral service. The chemical principles and precautions involved in sanitation, disinfection, public health, and embalming practice will be stressed. In addition, the course reviews government regulation of chemicals currently used in funeral service.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175  and FSE 101  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Differentiate among the representative chemicals in embalming fluid (arterial, cavity, and accessory) and describe their respective functions
    • Identify and list the potentially harmful chemicals used in the preparation room, and their regulations
    • Express the potentially harmful chemicals used in the preparation room and their regulations
    • Express representative chemicals in embalming fluids (arterial, cavity, and accessory) and give their respective functions
    • Indicate the essential characteristics of autolysis, hydrolysis, fermentation, and putrefaction in the area of chemistry of decomposition
    • Identify the characteristic features of solutions, suspensions, emulsions, and the processes of diffusions
    • Identify the essential characteristics of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins in the area of basic chemistry
    • Define organic chemistry and describe the characteristic features of organic compounds


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    FSE 256 Funeral Service Options

    3 credits
    This course examines services which are alternative to traditional funeral services and final disposition. Specific areas include, but are not limited to, cremation, green burial, and anatomical donation. Terminology, laws specific to alternative funerals, and properly memorializing the deceased are covered.

    Prerequisites: FSE 101 , FSE 130 , and FSE 141  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Describe operational procedures specific to alternative funeral services
    • Identify trends in funeral service
    • Create a marketing plan to support alternative funerals
    • Evaluate the introduction of pet cremation and services


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    FSE 258 Restorative Arts and Lab I

    3 credits
    This course is a survey of the basic principles of restorative art as they relate to funeral service. Especially stressed are the techniques and importance of creating an acceptable physical appearance of the deceased for the benefit of the surviving family members. The course includes weekly lab.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175 , FSE 140 , and FSE 141  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Recognize the importance of obtaining permission to perform any restorative procedure
    • Differentiate between restoration and embalming procedures
    • Name and locate the major bony structures of the skull and explain how each influences surface forms
    • Name and locate the major muscles of the face and explain how each influences surface form and expression
    • Identify and describe the natural and acquired facial markings of the face and neck
    • Explain how facial proportions relate to the natural form of the facial features and facial restoration
    • Identify and describe the forms of the head and face from the profile, frontal and bilateral views
    • Identify and describe the four major facial features, their parts and variations
    • Explain the principles of pigments, their classifications, and their application to cosmetic compounds
    • Apply, from a specified cosmetic medium, the correct colorants to achieve a natural appearance under various conditions
    • Identify and describe the various cosmetic and restorative equipment, materials, and treatments
    • Properly use curling irons, different brushes, combs, and hair dryers to style hair
    • Classify and explain, as relates to viewing, the principles of illumination
    • Construct a clay model of the head using correct anatomical measurements


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    FSE 259 Restorative Arts and Lab II

    3 credits
    This course is designed to expand upon the components of the restorative process learned in FSE 258 FSE 258 Restorative Arts and Lab I . Emphasis will be placed upon the facial and hand reconstruction of the deceased. Students will work in small groups in the laboratory setting for a comprehensive hands-on experience.

    Prerequisites: FSE 258  

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply the color theory principles learned in FSE 258 to determine proper cosmetic applications
    • Create facial feature and hand reconstruction and modeling on a deceased person
    • Distinguish between a natural and artificial appearance and determine steps needed to correct an artificial appearance
    • Apply the techniques needed to overcome difficulties due to trauma, extenuating circumstances, and aggressive illnesses


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    FSE 261 Embalming II with Lab

    4 credits
    This course covers the process of chemically treating the dead human body to reduce the presence and growth of microorganisms, to temporarily inhibit organic decomposition, and to restore an acceptable physical appearance.

    Prerequisites: FSE 251  and FSE 255  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Explain and demonstrate the concepts of sanitation, disinfection, temporary preservation, and restoration of human remains
    • Describe the general chemical principles of embalming fluids and calculation, and summarize the chemical components
    • Explain how the vascular system is used to distribute and diffuse embalming chemicals to the tissues of the body
    • Identify and document body conditions, embalming techniques and procedures performed with written embalming reports
    • Demonstrate and describe the use of embalming instruments, equipment and sundries, and embalming techniques and procedures
    • Discuss and demonstrate safe environmental work practices through proper disposal of contaminated materials, and proper methods of disposal of blood and body fluids during and following the embalming process
    • Identify and illustrate the ethical practices and the legal and professional responsibilities associated with the custody, sheltering, identification, and preparation of the dead human body by the process of embalming or preparation without embalming
    • Indicate the anatomical considerations for vessel sites and selections


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    FSE 262 Funeral Service Microbiology and Lab

    4 credits
    This course covers the basic principles of microbiology as they relate to the funeral profession, especially as they pertain to sanitation, disinfection, public health, and embalming practice. Includes laboratory. 

    Prerequisites: FSE 251  

    Corequisites: FSE 271  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify basic microbial morphology
    • Describe basic microbial physiology
    • Interpret host-parasite relationships and interactions and the requirements of successful parasitism
    • Demonstrate proper chemical disinfection and sterilization procedure
    • Describe the fundamentals of the infectious processes and specific and non-specific defense mechanisms against disease
    • Name the methods of transmission of infectious diseases and describe the control procedure of these diseases with special emphasis on protection to the embalmer, the funeral director, and the public
    • Differentiate between the indigenous microorganisms and pathogens and opportunists causing disease commonly associated with the human host and dead human remains


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    FSE 271 Embalming III Lab

    3 credits
    This class is a continuation of FSE 251  and FSE 261 . The subject includes the study of the phenomenon of death in the human body, government regulations applicable to the embalming process, embalming analysis and reports, and instrumentation.

    Prerequisites: FSE 261  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the problems caused by, and the embalming treatments for various causes of death, including but not limited to infections, communicable diseases, trauma, pathological conditions, and disaster situations
    • Identify the treatment for organs and tissues recovered
    • Explain and demonstrate the preparation of the infant, autopsy and non-autopsy embalming techniques and procedures
    • Explain and demonstrate cavity embalming procedures and postmortem conditions of discolorations, decomposition, dehydration, general body conditions, vascular difficulties, moisture considerations, radiation and their embalming treatments
    • Integrate information from microbiology, anatomy, pathology, chemistry, and restorative art to predict a protocol to be used for the embalming process


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    FSE 274 Funeral Service Pathology

    3 credits
    This course covers pathological disease conditions and how they affect various parts of the body. Particular emphasis is given to those conditions which relate to or affect the embalming or restorative art processes.

    Prerequisites: FSE 261  and FSE 262  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of diseases and related terminology which will enable professionally recognized communication with members of the medical community, allied professionals, and surviving family members
    • Describe the benefits derived from the postmortem examination of human remains
    • Identify the pathological conditions and etiological factors which require special procedures in the removal, handling, preparation, and disposition of human remains
    • Recognize the relationship between the disease process and embalming analysis


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    FSE 275 Comprehensive Review

    3 credits
    This course reviews all 13 subjects that will be tested on the National Board Examination (NBE). The NBE is the nationally-recognized standard for FSE graduates, and taking the NBE is one requirement of graduation from the FSE program at Lake Washington Institute of Technology. This course is taken during the student’s last quarter.

    Prerequisites: Program director permission required

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Explain the functions of a funeral director
    • Define the legal requirements of the various regulatory agencies as they pertain to a funeral director’s responsibilities
    • Analyze the factors which influence the diverse needs of funeral service clientele
    • Select individual embalming treatments based upon the specific requests of client/families
    • Demonstrate ability to respond appropriately to hypothetical situations involving human remains
    • Effectively answer questions regarding funeral service options
    • Differentiate between the various types of funeral merchandise/sundries and their purposes
    • Explain the importance of embalming using the basic elements related to science courses
    • Distinguish between the various types of disposition
    • Assess the various options utilized in personalizing a funeral to the family’s needs
    • Demonstrate appropriate listening skills while meeting with a family


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    FSE 296 Funeral Service Internship

    5 credits
    Preparation for a funeral service career is facilitated with on-site observation and participation. Instruction in equipment use, procedures, and functions in the daily operation of a funeral home occurs in affiliated clinical sites, as well as in lecture.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain OSHA’s hazard communication standard, formaldehyde standard, and blood borne pathogens standard
    • Define funeral terminology
    • Recognize needs within the accepted modes of disposition of human remains
    • Compare and contrast theoretical instruction with actual industry practice
    • Describe issues relating to death and funeralization
    • Identify procedures in the disposition of human remains
    • Apply skills gained through observation and practice within the funeral service profession


    Total Hours: 110 (The hours for this course were previously listed in error; corrected 03/27/2018.) Lecture Hours: 20 Practicum or Internship Hours: 90 

Geology

  
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    GEOL& 101 Intro Physical Geology

    5 credits
    Studies the physical processes, both on and beneath the surface, that have over time given the earth its present form. Course format includes field and laboratory study of minerals, rocks, and maps. Off-campus field trip may be required. Laboratory Science Course.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Evaluate scientific information using the scientific method
    • Distinguish between observation and interpretation, and hypothesis and theory
    • Define geology
    • Identify the major layers of the earth and list their basic characteristics
    • Explain the theory of plate tectonics and its significance
    • Describe igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks and their relationship between them in the rock cycle
    • Identify and distinguish between igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks
    • Explain how and why rocks undergo metamorphism
    • Define elements, minerals, and rocks and describe the differences between them
    • Describe some common uses of minerals in our everyday lives
    • Apply basic rock interpretation techniques to local examples and case studies
    • Explain how and where magma forms in the earth and its relationship to igneous rocks
    • Describe the basic structure of soil
    • Differentiate between weathering and erosion
    • Compare the common types of environments in which sediment is deposited, and list the characteristics of the sediments found in each environment
    • Distinguish between relative and absolute time and explain how they are used in conjunction to determine the age of rocks
    • Place human concept of time in context of geologic time
    • Explain what causes earthquakes and how they are related to plate boundaries
    • Describe some of the geologic effects of earthquakes
    • Apply earthquake knowledge to describe the types and causes of earthquakes in the northwest
    • Describe the basic tectonic setting of the Pacific Northwest
    • List the basic agents that are responsible for sculpting the earth’s surface (rivers, groundwater, glaciers, wind and wave)
    • Distinguish between resources and reserve and between renewable and nonrenewable geologic resources


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

Health Sciences

  
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    HLSC 100 College and Career Success for Health Sciences

    3 credits


    This course will help students explore careers in health sciences and learn college success strategies. Using critical thinking skills, students will apply study skills to healthcare content and develop an academic plan related to their career.

    Required first-quarter course for all new Health Sciences AAS-T, Associate in Biology DTA/MRP, and Associate in Pre-Nursing DTA/MRP students.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe an overview of the health science industry, including trends
    • Compare and contrast careers within the health sciences
    • Identify and use reliable sources of information to make career choices
    • Articulate an educational plan for multiple careers in health sciences
    • Articulate a career plan, clearly identifying how the chosen career is a best fit for them
    • Describe the roles of practice and feedback in learning motor skills required in health science education
    • Discuss professional behaviors which promote success in health science education and careers
    • Successfully use the current online learning platform
    • Describe various college resources that support student success and when and how the student would use them
    • Apply study skills relevant to succeeding in health sciences education
    • Apply multiple learning strategies to improve learning 
    • Articulate own cultural identity and its impact on the professional role
    • Describe what it means to take multiple perspectives in diverse settings


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
  •  

    HLSC 104 Healthcare Front Office I

    5 credits
    This course introduces topics related to healthcare front office administration and billing.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  and ABED 046  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define the responsibilities of the healthcare front office administrator
    • Discuss ethical, legal, and regulatory issues and responsibilities in the healthcare office
    • Explain the role of the healthcare front office administrator with respect to patient relations
    • Demonstrate an understanding of how technology is used in a healthcare office
    • Explain the importance of printed communications in a healthcare office
    • Explain the healthcare front office administrator’s role in file/report management
    • Define basic healthcare terminology
    • Explain various chart documentations and their importance in patient treatment


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    HLSC 105 Healthcare Front Office II

    5 credits
    This course introduces topics on managing the healthcare front office.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  and ABED 046  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe a variety of forms that are used in a healthcare office
    • Explain the reasons for clinical records management
    • Identify a variety of healthcare reference books and explain their uses
    • Explain healthcare insurance contract interpretation
    • List a variety of procedures and the billing codes that accompany them
    • Explain the process of insurance claim billing
    • Describe healthcare practice accounts receivable
    • Define accounts payable
    • Identify good employment skills and job search strategies


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    HLSC 106 Healthcare Front Office III

    5 credits
    Clinical practice designed to advance students’ competence in healthcare front office functions, performed under direct supervision in private practice, specialty office, or dental clinic.

    Prerequisites: HLSC 104  and HLSC 105  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe rules and regulations related to
      • Attendance
      • Attitude
      • Professionalism
      • Appearance
      • Ethical and legal issues
    • Maintain professional behavior in respect to attendance, attitude, appearance, and dental ethics
    • Describe, identify, and exhibit communication skills appropriate in the clinical setting (i. e., interaction with supervisor, staff, patients, coworkers)
    • Keep records during the clinical assignments to include procedures and assignments completed
    • Schedule appointments for patients
    • Process insurance claims
    • Create treatment plans/pre-determination of benefits
    • Obtain a breakdown of coverage for a patient
    • Collect patient co-pays at the time of service
    • Balance the day’s production and collections
    • Greet and check-in patients for their appointments
    • Answer and direct phone calls
    • Create or send written communications to patients/specialists/insurance company


    Total Hours: 130 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 120
  
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    HLSC 107 Infection Control I

    5 credits
    This course introduces topics on infection control and management of hazardous materials in a healthcare facility.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Corequisites: HLSC 108  and HLSC 109  (may be taken a quarter later)

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain basic microbiologic entities and the relationship to infection control
    • List characteristics of microorganisms
    • Outline development of infectious diseases
    • Identify microorganisms controlled by infection control
    • Identify new and emerging microbiologic threats in healthcare
    • Define bloodborne pathogens
    • List diseases of concern to healthcare personnel and patients prevented by proper infection control in healthcare
    • Recognize the importance of immunization in preventing disease
    • List the personal protective barriers and their importance


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    HLSC 108 Infection Control II

    5 credits
    This course introduces topics on asepsis in healthcare and healthcare office policies and procedures with respect to infection control and management of hazardous materials. Other topics include infection control rules and regulations for Washington State, laboratory set up and practices, and infection control in patient treatment areas.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Corequisites: HLSC 107  and HLSC 109  (may be taken a quarter later)

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain instrument processing
    • Define surface and equipment asepsis
    • Explain unit water asepsis
    • Define aseptic techniques
    • Explain laboratory and radiographic asepsis
    • Define waste management and hazardous waste management
    • Explain why healthcare facilities must have a clinical asepsis protocol
    • Describe the importance of the occupational safety and health administration
    • Identify the importance of the management of the office safety program
    • Explain how chemicals are managed safely in a healthcare facility
    • List reasons of the importance of employing a fire prevention and emergency action plan


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    HLSC 109 Infection Control III

    5 credits
    Clinical practice designed to advance students’ competence in instrument sterilization and infection control procedures, performed under direct supervision in private practice, specialty office, clinic, hospital, or biotech lab.

    Prerequisites: HLSC 107  and HLSC 108  (can also be completed as corequisites)

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe rules and regulations related to
      • Attendance
      • Attitude
      • Professionalism
      • Appearance
      • Ethical and legal issues
    • Maintain professional behavior in respect to attendance, attitude, appearance, and dental ethics
    • Describe, identify, and exhibit communication skills appropriate in the clinical setting
    • Keep records during the clinical assignments to include procedures and assignments completed
    • Maintain infection control and aseptic techniques
    • Sanitize, disinfect, and sterilize instruments and equipment
    • Maintain the sterilization machines
    • Complete a spore test on the sterilization machine
    • Properly handle and store sterilized instruments


    Total Hours: 130 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 120

History

  
  •  

    HIST& 126 World Civilizations I

    5 credits
    This course is an introduction to early world history with a global perspective, spanning the time period from human prehistory through the origins of civilization, the rise of the classical world, the birth of Islam, and the events of the Middle Ages. The course emphasizes cultural themes, including the technology, economic systems, agricultural practices, arts, governments, and religions of the period’s major civilizations.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 099 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use primary source materials from the period’s civilizations to increase knowledge of events and individuals
    • Compare and contrast various civilizations based on analysis of their methods of development and on cultural aspects including art, government, agriculture, and religion
    • Describe various systems of government and analyze how these systems work to increase or lessen inequality.
    • Synthesize multiple viewpoints in order to develop comprehensive descriptions of the civilizations being examined
    • Describe the importance of technology as a contributing factor in social and economic change
    • Compare and contrast the origins of the major world religions and their effects on early world societies
    • Outline the origins and development of early Bronze Age
    • Describe the societal changes that occurred with the transition from the Bronze to the Iron Age
    • Create timelines indicating the historical development of the classical civilizations
    • Describe the development of post-classical civilizations, outline the role these civilizations played in the early Middle Ages, and explain how these civilizations interacted with one another
    • Apply one’s analysis of world cultures to assist in recognizing and deepening one’s own global perspective


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    HIST& 146 US History I

    5 credits
    This course is a study of Early American history, covering pre-Columbian societies through the development of the American Republic of the early 1800’s. The course emphasizes the cultural development and the economic and political structures of this period, with major themes including indigenous societies, changes brought by European colonization, ethnic and religious diversity, slavery, the war for Independence, the formation of the U.S. Constitution and the beginnings of westward expansion.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 099 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify key movements, individuals, groups and ideas from the pre-Columbian era through the early 19th Century
    • Compare and contrast the culture of pre-Columbian North America with the society that evolved after the European conquest
    • Distinguish the social, economic, and religious uniqueness of the Northern, Middle and Southern colonies
    • Describe the significant events in the development of British North America, including the French and Indian War and the evolution of the British Empire
    • Analyze the issues and personalities responsible for the War for Independence and the significance of the Declaration of Independence
    • Identify and discuss the historical and philosophical sources of the American constitution
    • Analyze key social issues, including relations with Native Americans and the creation of a slave system
    • Describe the sources for and effects of the westward expansion through the presidency of Andrew Jackson
    • Analyze and articulate cause and effect relationships in past events and human interactions
    • Evaluate historical data from different sources in an effective and critical manner


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    HIST& 147 US History II

    5 credits
    This course examines the important figures, events, and themes in the history of the United States from 1815 until 1914. It proceeds chronologically and thematically through the 19th Century, examining themes and events such as the formation of political parties, slavery, immigration, westward expansion, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the Industrial Revolution, urbanization, segregation, and imperialism. The course will highlight a number of issues widely debated in the 19th Century, especially after the Civil War, which remain relevant today.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 099  (or placement into ENGL& 101 

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Name and describe important individuals, events, and movements in the U.S. during the 19th Century
    • Describe key social issues, including the effects of immigration, of slavery and segregation, and the influence of corporations and business on government
    • Synthesize multiple viewpoints in order to develop comprehensive descriptions of the events and social issues being examined
    • Use basic skills of historical method, including critical evaluation of both primary and secondary sources
    • Analyze and articulate cause and effect relationships in the events and human interactions that occurred during this time period
    • Demonstrate skills in critical thinking, writing, conducting research, and constructing arguments.
    • Deliver effective presentations on course topics


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    HIST& 148 US History III

    5 credits
    This course examines the important figures, events, and themes in the history of the United during the 20th century. It examines themes and events such as the First and Second World Wars, the Great Depression and New Deal, the Cold War, suburbanization, the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and increasing political polarization. 

    Prerequisites: ENGL 099  (or placement into ENGL& 101 )

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and describe important individuals, events, and movements in the U.S. in the U.S. during the 20th Century
    • Discuss four questions that continue to affect American politics: a) What does it mean to be an American?; b) What is the proper role of the federal government?; c) What is the proper role of the US in world affairs?; and d) What is the impact of technology on American society?
    • Synthesize multiple viewpoints in order to develop comprehensive descriptions of the events and social issues being examined
    • Use basic skills of the historical method, including critical evaluation of both primary and secondary sources
    • Analyze and articulate cause and effect relationships in the events and human interactions that occurred during this time period
    • Demonstrate skills in critical thinking, writing, conducting research, and constructing arguments
    • Deliver effective presentations on course topics


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
 

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