Catalog 2017-2018 
    
    Feb 26, 2021  
Catalog 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Diesel and Heavy Equipment Technician

  
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    DHET 132 Gasoline/Liquid Propane Gas Systems

    3 credits
    The study of gasoline and liquid propane fueled engines. Combustion processes, engine subsystems maintenance, repair, adjustments. Includes application and installation requirements.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125  and completion of, or enrollment in DHET 131 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while working on engines
    • Effectively use OEM terminology related specifically to gasoline or LPG engines or subsystems
    • Performeffective gasoline or LPG engine diagnostic procedures
    • Perform effective gasoline or LPG engine removal and installation procedures
    • Perform effective gasoline or LPG engine repair procedures
    • Perform effective gasoline or LPG engine maintenance procedures


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    DHET 133 Diesel Systems

    3 credits
    The study of diesel fueled engines. Combustion processes, engine subsystems maintenance, repair, adjustments. Includes application and installation requirements.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125  and completion of, or enrollment in DHET 131  and DHET 132 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while working  on engines
    • Explain the operation of diesel engines throughout each cycle to include relative component position in rotation by degree, action by direction, or reaction caused by pressure or temperature change
    • Effectively use OEM terminology related specifically to diesel engines or subsystems
    • Perform effective diesel engine diagnostic procedures
    • Perform effective diesel engine repair procedures
    • Perform effective diesel engine maintenance procedures


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    DHET 134 Fuel Injection

    3 credits
    The study of fuel injection systems. Includes operating principles, component identification, maintenance, repair, installation, and application.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125  and completion of, or enrollment in DHET 131 , DHET 132  and DHET 133 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while working with fuel injection systems
    • Describe fuel injection systems operating principles
    • Describe the difference between fuel injection systems operation used by modern engine manufactures
    • Use OEM terminology related to fuel injection systems operation and component identification
    • Perform effective diagnostic procedures used on fuel injection systems
    • Perform effective repair procedures used on fuel injection systems
    • Successfully complete a proficiency exam that meets industry standards


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    DHET 135 Diagnostics/Adjustments/Emissions

    3 credits
    The study of electronically controlled engine subsystems. Includes operating principles, component identification maintenance, trouble-shooting, computer diagnostics, repair, installation techniques, emissions and controls.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125  and completion of, or enrollment in DHET 131 , DHET 132 , DHET 133  and DHET 134 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while working with fuel injection systems, electronically controlled engine subsystems and emission control system
    • Identify electronically controlled engine subsystems and emission control components
    • Diagnose and repair electronically controlled engine subsystems and emission control components 
    • Describe differences between electronically controlled engine subsystems and emission control components used by modern engine manufactures
    • Successfully complete a proficiency exam that meets industry standards


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    DHET 211 Hydraulic Fluid Power I

    6 credits
    An introduction to fluid power basic laws and fluid characteristics. System components, identification and application.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while working with hydraulic fluid power systems
    • Diagnose open and closed center systems
    • Repair variations of open and closed center systems
    • Use hydraulic systems by researching and compiling data to varied uses of hydraulics
    • Disassemble, inspect, and adjust hydraulic systems according to manufacturers’ specifications


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    DHET 213 Hydraulic Fluid Power II

    6 credits
    A continuation of the study of fluid power with focus on troubleshooting, maintenance, and system integration. Includes schematic interpretation.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125  and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in DHET 211  and DHET 212.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while working with hydraulic fluid power systems
    • Test oil filtration systems by demonstrating how to inspect, select and change filters in accordance to manufacturers specifications
    • Maintain hydraulic systems by performing assignments related to system care in accordance to manufacturers specifications
    • Interpret basic schematics and symbols, and  read hydraulic symbol drawings and flow diagrams
    • Disassemble, inspect and explain the functions and principles of the operation of hydraulic systems
    • Disassemble, assemble and repair hydraulic motors in accordance to manufacturers specifications
    • Disassemble, assemble and repair hydraulic accumulators in accordance to manufacturers specifications
    • Repair reservoirs, oil coolers, hoses, pipes, tubes, couplers, and seals
    • Disassemble, assemble and repair hydraulic cylinders by disassembling and reassembling cylinders


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    DHET 214 Diesel Mechanical Practices

    3 credits
    A study of the concepts of force and work applied to mechanical, fluid, and thermal energy systems. The course includes problem-solving and workplace applications.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113  and TRAN 125 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while working with mechanical, fluid and thermal systems
    • Apply math and formulas to resolve mechanical problems
    • Apply math and formulas to resolve fluid problems
    • Research electronic resources  and use technical information to make troubleshooting and repair decisions


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    DHET 221 Power Trains/Standard

    6 credits
    The study of clutches, manual transmissions, drivelines, U- joints and differentials. Includes operation, maintenance, disassembly, re-assembly and installation.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while working with Power Trains/Standards
    • Disassemble, inspect, install and adjust clutches in accordance to manufacturers specifications
    • Disassemble, inspect, repair, reassemble, and adjust manual transmissions in accordance to manufacturers specifications
    • Repair all variations of drive shafts
    • Disassemble, inspect, repair and reassemble, install and adjust differentials in accordance to manufacturers specifications


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    DHET 222 Power Trains/Power Shift

    6 credits
    The study of power shift transmissions, torque converters and machine steering systems. Includes instruction in maintenance, repair, installation and application.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while working with Power Trains/Power Shift
    • Disassemble, inspect, repair and reassemble power shift transmissions, planetary gears, hydraulic clutch packs, planet carriers
    • Inspect, test, remove and replace  torque converters
    • Inspect, test, remove and replace hydraulic couplers and hydraulic retarders


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    DHET 223 Traction and Components

    3 credits
    The study of traction and related components and undercarriage systems used in heavy duty applications. Includes instruction in maintenance, adjustment, removal and installation.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while working with Tractions and components
    • Disassemble, inspect, repair and reassemble tractor type undercarriage components
    • Adjust tracks to O.E.M. specifications
    • Comply with industry standard safe practices while working with traction systems


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    DHET 231 Steering/Suspension/Frames

    5 credits
    The study of heavy duty steering, suspension, and frame systems. A focus on terminology, application, inspection, repair and adjustment procedures.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while working on heavy duty steering, suspension systems and frame systems
    • Identify all major components of heavy duty steering, suspensions, and frame systems
    • Troubleshoot, remove and replace components of heavy duty steering, suspensions and frame systems
    • Perform adjustment tasks to industry standards


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    DHET 232 Pneumatics

    5 credits
    A study of pneumatic system components such as wiper motors, brake valves, air springs, and locking mechanisms. Includes instruction in application, maintenance, repair, installation, and schematic interpretation.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successsful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Follow industry standard safe practices while working on pneumatice operated systems
    • Troubleshoot, maintain, and repair pneumatic system components
    • Adjustment and inspect for travel and applied angle


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    DHET 233 Foundation Brakes

    5 credits
    The study of foundation brake systems and components including purpose, nomenclature, repair, maintenance, adjustment, and drivability complaint diagnosis.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125  and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in DHET 232 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful  completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate industry standard safe practices while working on foundation brake systems
    • Demonstrate understanding of foundation brake system operating concepts
    • Demonstrate repair and maintenance procedures of foundation brake systems to industry standard
    • Test foundation brake system component operation and compare to DOT specifications
    • Demonstrate how to measure lining wear and determine compare to legal limit specifications
    • Demonstrate proper adjustment procedures and inspect for travel and applied angle


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60

Digital Gaming and Interactive Media

  
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    GAME 105 Storyboard Development

    4 credits
    This course will continue with hands-on drawing exercises that explain a concept on paper through drawing, and finally, several concepts in sequence. Gain a further understanding of the communication visually between employee and employer, graphic designer and client, and designer to designer.

    Prerequisites: ART 121  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of transferring an idea to a drawn visual image
    • Demonstrating an understanding of transferring a set of ideas into a visual image that directly relates to a time line of events
    • Demonstrate a solid understanding of transferring a group of ideas to drawn images presented in a sequential fashion - a storyboard


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    GAME 108 Interactive Media Design

    5 credits


    This course explores current trends and development in interactive media and interface/interaction design. Students will gain an understanding of terminology and concepts essential to interactive platforms by observing and analyzing contemporary content, and applying theoretical interaction principles to projects and exercises. Elements and principles of design will be reviewed with an emphasis on applying these principles to interaction design and usability for web and mobile device content.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Develop professional awareness through research and networking
    • Define concepts and terminology in interaction design
    • Define the processes for developing interactive applications from concept to final product
    • Analyze various types of interactive media based on game theory and strategy, their historical context, future applications, and current trends
    • Evaluate interactive applications critically


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    GAME 124 Introduction to 3D with Maya

    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to the 3D content creation process as practiced in Maya. Best practices for 3D modeling, texturing, file management, and animation will be examined. Students will build several small scenes and render those scenes into movies. Emphasis will be placed on 3D as it relates to the video game industry.

    Prerequisites: DSGN 122 , ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher), and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Model small scenes using Maya
    • Create, manipulate and render 3D content
    • Build basic scenes within Maya
    • Create simple animations within Maya
    • Manage files and content congruent with Industry
    • Devise multiple ways to build objects in 3D


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    GAME 127 Level Editing 1

    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to the elements of creating and modifying content and levels within the Unity Game Engine. Best practices for level creation and delivery will be examined, including importing 3D objects from Maya, applying textures, creating terrain and creating special effects. Emphasis will be placed on modifying existing Unity content and Environmental Design.

    Prerequisites: GAME 124  

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Design their own small game level (mod) in Unreal (UDK)
    • Present and defend their mod
    • Identify, critique, and explore different game types within Unreal
    • Perform basic editing of level textures and lights in Unreal
    • Import 3D objects from Maya into Unreal
    • Place procedural objects in Unreal
    • Place and manipulate a skydome in Unreal
    • Create water volumes and edit terrain in Unreal


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    GAME 130 Concept Art - Characters

    4 credits


    This course covers the elements of traditional concept art creation as it applies to the video game industry. Best practices for traditional and electronic character creation for portfolio usage will be examined. Photoshop will also be used to help express these characters.

    Prerequisites: ART 121  and DSGN 122  

    ART 205  recommended

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
     

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Draw characters in action poses
    • Draw characters from written descriptions
    • Draw characters in “turnaround” poses
    • Describe how Photoshop is used in the game  industry to render concept art
    • Recognize the importance of openness in interactions when critiquing
    • Present characters and defend technical and artistic choices


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    GAME 134 3D Materials and Textures

    4 credits
    This course covers the elements of creating portfolio quality Shaders/Textures applied to a 3D scene. Best practices for creating realistic looking textures will be applied. Students will apply techniques learned in class and build a realistic 3D scene based on a theme.

    Prerequisites: GAME 124  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create realistic looking textures in Photoshop
    • Apply various textures to 3D objects in a scene
    • Create Alpha channels
    • Create Bump and Normal maps
    • Model props in a using current 3D software


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    GAME 137 Lighting and Effects

    4 credits
    This course covers the elements of lighting, shading, and special effects within Maya. Best practices for the creation of high definition modeled and rendered scenes for use in the student’s portfolio are covered. Emphasis will be on learning the benefits of using different lights within Maya as well as creating a final modeled and rendered 3D scene.

    Prerequisites: GAME 124  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Add and test lighting within a scene
    • Add and adjust shadows in a scene
    • Create a layered shader in Maya
    • Use dynamics in Maya
    • Use particle effects in Maya
    • Use fog effects in Maya
    • Create, document, and/or relay processes or information to peers and instructor


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    GAME 138 Introduction to Environmental Art

    4 credits


    This course introduces students to the basics of creating 3D Environmental Art within Maya. Students will create props and environments suitable for a game environment. Best practices for creating 3D models and related textures will be used to create a final 3D scene suitable for the student’s portfolio.

    Prerequisites: GAME 124  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
     

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Design props and textures for a game level
    • Edit basic level textures and lighting
    • Use “lipsticking” techniques and layered shaders to create blended textures
    • Model props for levels using Maya
    • Create tileable textures
    • Create fog and related special effects for level
    • Expand upon ideas received by creating 3D environments from written descriptions


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    GAME 148 Concept Art - Digital Painting

    4 credits
    This course covers the elements of traditional and electronic drawing of Landscape and Level concept art as it relates to the electronic gaming field. Best practices for creating portfolio quality work will be examined, including web-based tutorials and traditional drawing demonstrations. Students will present their work to peers on a regular basis. Emphasis will be placed on traditional drawing of landscapes based on written and visual reference. Electronic landscape drawings will be produced for the final project.

    Prerequisites: ART 121  and DSGN 122  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Draw from existing levels from in-game views
    • Draw multiple variations of a similar landscapes
    • Draw landscape and cityscape scenes
    • Use Alias Sketchbook at a basic level
    • Use Sketchup at a basic level
    • Use various Photoshop techniques to embellish a landscape or scene
    • Troubleshoot the basic methods of making a landscape look compelling and realistically drawn


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    GAME 150 Character Animation I

    4 credits
    This course covers the elements of rigging and animating a character in Maya. Students will rig a skeleton in Maya, and apply that rig to a character. Students will also animate this character in various short Maya scenarios. Emphasis on traditional animation techniques will be applied in this course.

    Prerequisites: GAME 124  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Rig 3D models
    • Skin and weight in Maya
    • Effectively use various animation techniques in Maya
    • Lip sync in Maya


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    GAME 165 3D Character Design

    4 credits
    Students construct and map “Low Polygon” 3D characters of their own design in this course. Students practice various modeling and skinning techniques and construct their own texture map for this character. Students learn to differentiate key attributes between a High Polygon and a Low Polygon character.

    Prerequisites: GAME 124  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize various modeling techniques
    • Apply high quality textures to Model
    • Troubleshoot polygonal issues


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    GAME 182 Level Editing II

    4 credits
    Students will work on small teams to create a game mod using an industry standard level editing software. Best practices for advanced level editing techniques will be practiced as well level design theory, creation, and workflow.

    Prerequisites: GAME 124  and GAME 127  

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use advanced tools in a level editing to create game levels
    • Create particle effects within the Unreal Developer Kit (UDK)
    • Create triggers and procedurally generated content within the UDK
    • Create traditionally drawn schematics and maps of levels to relate to a team
    • Pitch your vision of a game prototype to industry peers
    • Play different roles on a game development team


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    GAME 210 High Resolution Sculpting I

    4 credits
    This course will introduce students to the basics of the ZBrush software. Students will learn the techniques associated with ZBrush as well as Basic 3D modeling theory.

    Prerequisites: GAME 124  

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Construct basic models in 3D using Zbrush
    • Edit existing models with Zbrush
    • Paint textures using Zbrush
    • Compare and analyze various modeling techniques
    • Troubleshoot technical problems


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    GAME 215 High Resolution Sculpting II

    4 credits
    This course will build on the student’s previous knowledge of Zbrush and introduce advanced skills related to implementing Zbrush into the game production pipeline. Students will learn how to create highly detailed characters and objects that can be displayed in portfolios.

    Prerequisites: GAME 210  

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create high end models for game production
    • Implement high end skills like topology, extraction, and normal mapping
    • Paint textures using Zbrush and export to Maya
    • Create a portfolio piece to show potential employers
    • Customize the interface, create macros, and tweak Zscripts


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    GAME 266 Character Animation II with Maya

    4 credits


    Course builds upon the character and technical animation skills learned in MMDP 150 Character Animation 1. Students will rig a skeleton in Maya, apply and weight that rig to a character mesh, and animate the character in Maya with emphasis on advanced digital and traditional and character animation techniques.

    This course develops a mastery of character acting and emotional facial animation in Maya with advanced rigging techniques with the goal of producing a professional quality demo sample reel. Students will learn to animate looping and linking game play animation cycles- walk, run, jump, fall, hit, recoil, gesture, idle, etc.

    Prerequisites: GAME 124  and GAME 150  

    GAME 165  recommended

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
     

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create and implement a rig for biped character animation in Maya
    • Utilize key frame and procedural animation
    • Adjust and edit skin weights
    • Create looping cycles of key-framed actions
    • Create fluid, dynamic character animation
    • Create emotionally expressive facial and body gestures.
    • Create lip sync facial animation
    • Utilize Motion Capture data
    • Produce professional quality animation demo reel


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    GAME 267 C# Programming in Unity Game Engine

    5 credits
    Course teaches students C# programming language in the context of a Unity gameplay experience. This programming course is a bridge between the Digital Gaming and Information Technology Applications Development (ITAD) programs. Digital Gaming students will learn and apply programming language to game design. ITAD students will experience and create interactive programming for gaming.

    Prerequisites: CSD 111  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create object oriented design and implement interactive software in Unity game engine
    • Incorporate 3D interactive graphics including modeling, animation, transformations, lighting, shaders, and ray casting
    • Write gameplay code in C# programming language, classes, inheritance, and event-driven programming
    • Create C# code that allows for high level control of gameplay behavior, movement, and events
    • Write programming sequences of gameplay AI (Artificial Intelligence)
    • Simulate the physics principles of gravity and collision detection with C# code
    • Collaborate on interdisciplinary projects


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    GAME 272 Game Development - Team Projects

    4 credits


    Students will form  production teams based on roles in professional game development studio. Team members will develop their specialized skills as they design, create and develop playable games for public display and potentially commercial distribution.

    Students will develop the disciplines and skills of concept art, game design, story narrative, character creation, animation, game mechanics, environmental art, event triggering, level editing, game programming, sound creation and audio editing, project management, promotion, presentations and play testing.

    The teams will develop projects on  current and next-gen gameplay engines and technology including mobile, PC, MAC, Oculus Rift and consoles.

    Prerequisites: GAME 108 GAME 124 , GAME 127 GAME 148 , and instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course student team members will be able to:

    • Develop an original game concept and produce a game design document
    • Collaborate effectively with other team members to develop playable interactive experiences that are congruent with the game industry standards
    • Present games at PAX Game Expo in Seattle


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    GAME 273 Digital Gaming Workshop - 3D Portrait Modeling

    4 credits


    Workshop introduces students to 3D facial modeling using Blender software. Class teaches fundamental industry-standard modeling skills to create a realistic 3D portrait that students may transform into a personalized fantasy portrait bust model.

    The project will result in a final digital file format that can be rendered and 3D printed by the student. Blender is a free 3D modeling program that the student can continue to use after the workshop.

    This course covers Facial Concept, Design and Development, Modeling, 3D Materials & Textures, UV Mapping, Digital Painting Texture. Previous game design and creation, traditional art and digital graphics programs and coding experience are a plus.

     

    This course is exempt from the underage enrollment process.

    Prerequisites: Passion for gaming, familiarity with different gameplay genres, strong computer software skills. Instructor permission required.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create original character concepts and designs
    • Create professional-quality 3D models
    • Develop digital painting skills
    • Create textures in Adobe Photoshop
    • Create UV texture maps and apply co-ordinates to 3D character
    • Apply digital lighting principles to 3D Model
    • Output files to create physical models with 3D printers


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    GAME 274 Digital Gaming Workshop - A Game in a Month

    4 credits


    Workshop fast-tracks game development led by an industry professional. Students work individually or on teams to develop playable games or apps with state of the art game development hardware and software-Maya, Blender, Z-Brush, Photoshop, and Wacom Tablets.

    Projects are developed using current industry-standard Unity Game Engine, which is available free for students to use after the workshop to continue developing and refining their projects.

    This course teaches Interactive Concept, Design and Development, Gameplay U.I., U.X., Team Dynamics, Leadership skills. Previous game design and creation, traditional art and digital graphics programs and coding experience are a plus.

     

    This course is exempt from the underage enrollment process.

    Prerequisites: Passion for gaming, familiarity with different gameplay genres, strong computer software skills. Instructor permission required.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create original game play concepts
    • Design gameplay interaction
    • Design and layout gameplay levels
    • Collaborate with teams based on professional models
    • Conceptualize and implement gameplay mechanics
    • Balance game play principles of obstacles, difficulty, and reward
    • Play, test, and evaluate gameplay
    • Self-publish game
    • Present original game or application


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    GAME 310 Digital Storytelling: Components of Narrative and Mythology

    5 credits
    Stories, narratives, are the tools we use to make sense of life. As humans, we seek to understand the events and challenges of our lives by formulating them into story, telling the tale. This course is an introduction to the archetypal tales, characters, and structures that comprise the foundation on which stories are built in film, literature, game design, art, music, education, and other contexts.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BAS in Digital Gaming and Interactive Media program

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    GAME 312 Interactive Media Studies

    3 credits
    This course will explore the formal, aesthetic, and cultural aspects of interactive experience and the relationship of digital games to traditional games and other media. Lectures will examine interactive media from an academic standpoint: history, aesthetics, genres, cultural context, and social significance. Lecture and labs will deconstruct and analyze various forms of interactive media such as cards and board games to develop an understanding of their theory and structure. Lectures and lab will explore the intersection of technology, user experience, user interface, game design, and publishing, and how evolving digital technology is changing mass media as well as personal social interactions.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BAS in Digital Gaming and Interactive Media program

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    GAME 315 Principles of Game Play Mechanics

    3 credits
    Students will develop a literacy and mastery of the ontology and principles of game play mechanics and how these elements define player’s interactions with the rules of a game. Students will comprehend the formal properties of games: rules, objectives, challenges, rewards, goals, player actions, strategies, and game states. Students will research and develop non-traditional, experimental, and artistic games as well as games with a commercial focus. Students will develop an awareness of the social and ethical consequences of their projects and explore beyond what are traditionally thought of as games.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BAS in Digital Gaming and Interactive Media program

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    GAME 318 2D Game Design

    3 credits
    This course examines and workshops the development process for 2D games. Students will create multiple original games in common genres for multiple hardware platforms. Topics covered will focus on aesthetics, level design, visual cues, incentive, difficulty, level flow, play controls, scripting, audio, and mechanics in 2D.

    Prerequisites: GAME 312  and GAME 315  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    GAME 330 Advanced Character Rigging

    4 credits
    This course covers the primary elements of rigging a character in Maya. This course blends the art and the science of building a character rig. Students will spend time practicing what was demonstrated during the lecture portion of each class.

    Prerequisites: GAME 124 , GAME 312 , and GAME 315  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    GAME 332 3D Game Design

    4 credits
    This course examines and workshops developing games for interactive 3D game engines. Students will create multiple game projects in different genres. Student will develop mastery of 3D game mechanics, controls, and cameras. The course will explore the use of aesthetics, mechanics, and level design, and how they fit in with each of the many 3D game genres.

    Prerequisites: GAME 267  and GAME 318  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    GAME 335 Advanced Animation

    4 credits
    This course covers the fundamentals of animating a bi-ped character in Maya. Through animation assignments students will create looping and sequential animation as well as working with motion capture data. Emphasis on traditional animation principles and techniques are applied in this course. 

    Prerequisites: GAME 124 GAME 267 , and GAME 318  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    GAME 410 Interactive System Design

    3 credits
    This course explores the fundamental principles of interactive design; visual communication and the psychological principles related to design; human perception, memory, and cognitive flow; and conceptual approaches to visual systems. Students will develop the conceptual, analog, and digital skills and tools needed to design, build, and evaluate games and interactive experience systems. Labs will include flowcharting information architecture, storyboarding intuitive user interface and user experience, and rapid interface prototyping techniques.

    Prerequisites: GAME 330 , GAME 332 , and GAME 335  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    GAME 412 Designing for Platforms and Hardware

    4 credits
    This course will explore different interactive platforms and hardware and examine how to develop design strategies and game play experiences to best utilize the capability of each target platform. Students will learn how to design and create for multi-platform experiences as well as for specific platforms such as mobile, virtual reality, augmented reality, and site-based experiences. Students will learn how to exploit the potential advantages as well as design around the limitations and specific hardware and software requirements of each platform. Considerable emphasis is given to the design consideration of platform-specific user interface and user experience.

    Prerequisites: GAME 330 , GAME 332 , and GAME 335  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    GAME 415 Production Team 1: Preproduction

    4 credits
    This is the first class of a year-long course broken into three sections. The class will be organized into teams to develop an extensive project. Preproduction will examine and model through how real projects are designed, vetted, and planned before entering full production. Not only will students design and prototype the project and it systems, but they will plan and schedule the development using existing design methodologies based on given target dates, design specifics, task lists, and dependencies.

    Prerequisites: GAME 330 , GAME 332 , and GAME 335  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    GAME 420 Technical Design

    5 credits
    This course explores the technical side of interactive development. Students will examine core systems to better understand how the overall system works. Student will study and create projects exploring rendering pipelines, shaders, AI systems, physics engines, and other elements at the core of interactive design. Emphasis will be placed on optimization for multiple platforms, including AR/VR and developing technologies.

    Prerequisites: GAME 410 , GAME 412 , and GAME 415  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    GAME 422 Production Team 2: Production

    4 credits
    This course builds on Production Team 1: Preproduction and focuses on entering the development process and building the project.  The academic focus will be on management of production timelines and schedules, regular and effective communication, and the production process itself. Students will produce projects based on pre-determining design specifications; maintaining and meeting milestone schedules; using and maintaining project management software; and maintaining version/source control software to ensure effective communication within the team and management. 

    Prerequisites: GAME 415  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    GAME 430 Production Team 3: Postproduction

    5 credits
    This course builds on Production Team 2: Production and focuses on completing, testing, and marketing the project. Throughout the course, the development will end and the project will be prepared for release and submission.

    Prerequisites: GAME 422  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    GAME 432 Capstone Portfolio

    4 credits
    Students will concentrate on developing their entrepreneurial skills and creating a professional quality portfolio which expresses their unique creative vision and demonstrates their specific industry skills. Lecture and lab will include revising work to industry specifications, editing demo reels, engaging in industry job research, practicing concept pitches and job interviews, developing self-publishing strategies, and developing a robust online and social media professional network. Work will be critiqued by peers and industry professionals.

    Prerequisites: GAME 420  and GAME 422  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

Early Childhood Education

  
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    ECED 122 Creative Activities

    5 credits
    This course focuses on the development of activities and interest centers to enhance creativity using art, construction, sensory, large motor, block and dramatic play. This course also includes an introduction to selecting behavioral objectives and activity planning. Students develop a portfolio.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify age appropriate skills and objectives
    • Identify age appropriate activities
    • Develop written activity plans following the professional format
    • Plan developmentally appropriate activities for multi-age groups in art, construction, sensory, dramatic and block play, and large motor activities
    • Implement and evaluate activities in the children’s program
    • Set up age appropriate interest centers for art, sensory, block and dramatic play
    • Create a resource box for use in a child care setting
    • Develop plans for daily inclusion of large motor activities
    • Use active listening and positive communication skills to share and receive differing points of view from their peers


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ECED 130 Practicum II - Teaching Young Children

    3 credits
    In this course students will apply best practices for engaging in young children in meaningful learning experiences. In addition, students will focus on creating and implementing curriculum.

    Prerequisites: ECED& 120 , ECED& 160 , and EDUC& 115 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate appropriate practices in planning and implementing curriculum for young children.
    • Work with co-teachers to plan developmentally appropriate environments and activities.
    • Evaluate the needs of children in the class, and create learning experiences based on the interests of the children.
    • Develop a project based learning experience including documentation and planning in multiple areas.
    • Communicate curriculum ideas and the planning process with co-teachers, parents and children.


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 60
  
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    ECED 145 Science, Math, Music, and Creative Activities in ECE

    5 credits
    In this course students will explore ways to teach basic science, math, arts and music in early childhood education. Students will become familiar with the principles of instruction to introduce concepts and provide practice for early learners in each of the areas.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  and ABED 040  or placement scores.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and create age appropriate skills and objectives
    • Explain the importance of science, math, music and art activities in the classroom
    • Develop written activity plans to provide practice in each of the course topics
    • Implement and evaluate planned activities
    • Set up appropriate interest centers to provide practice in science, math, music and art
    • Work as a cooperative member of a small group


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ECED 199 Independent Study

    2-5 credits
    In this course students will identify and complete a supervised special project in Early Childhood Education.

    Prerequisites: Instrucotr permission required

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and examine a specific area of study in early childhood education
    • Design and implement outcomes and assessment methods for their specific project
    • Select, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate research to complete a research paper on the chosen topic
    • Evaluate completed research paper


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ECED 200 Practicum III - Reflection

    3 credits
    In this course students will use their observation skills to build an awareness of children’s growth and development. In addition, students will focus on adjusting their teaching strategies and curriculum based on the observations.

    Prerequisites: ECED 130  and ECED& 190 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate observation and assessment methods
    • Establish a system or tool for observation and use it in the classroom on a regular basis
    • Reflect on their teaching approaches, curriculum and classroom environment
    • Review their observations and think of ways to adjust teaching and curriculum based on these observations


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 60
  
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    ECED 212 Staff/Program Management

    5 credits
    Students develop a staff operations manual and personnel policies manual. The course includes the study of the procedures for staff development, in-service training, progressive discipline, and staff evaluations.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Corequisites: ECED 215 .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify materials necessary for staff success
    • Write program guidelines
    • Develop a staff operations and personnel policy manual
    • Identify methods that are effective in gathering input from staff
    • Develop written policy on sharing concerns with staff
    • Develop a progressive discipline policy
    • Create effective job descriptions
    • Develop interview questions with “look-fors” that are industry specific
    • Develop a 12 month staff development plan that promotes personal and professional development
    • Identify staff supervision techniques that promote and consider staff development, diversity, culture, experience, and learning styles
    • Identify effective techniques for negotiating and resolving conflict
    • Work as a cooperative member of a professional team


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ECED 215 Capstone Practicum

    3 credits


    In this course students will plan and implement a two-week curriculum. Students will work collaboratively with lab partner/lead teacher to create the environment and assess the activity planning.

    Note: The 2015-2016 catalog previously listed the course credits in error at two credits. ECED 215 is a three credit course and is iffered as such.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Plan implement and evaluate a children’s program
    • Communicate to staff members information related to environmental planning and programming
    • Receive suggestions/input from supervisor and peers and respond in a professional manner
    • Implement changes needed as the result of program evaluation


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 60

  
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    ECED& 105 Intro to Early Childhood Education

    5 credits
    This course explores the foundations of early childhood education. Students examine theories defining the field, issues and trends, best practices, and program models. In addition students observe children, professionals, and programs in action.

    Corequisites: ECED& 120 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain current theories and ongoing research in early care and education as it applies to children, families, and early childhood programs
    • Describe how children learn and develop through play and the role of play in early childhood programs
    • Observe an early childhood environment and identify examples of best practices
    • Compare and contrast early learning models
    • Identify appropriate guidance and discipline techniques used in family and early learning settings
    • Describe the observation, assessment, and teaching cycle used to plan curriculum and activities for young children
    • Apply professional code of ethics for early care and education to resolve a dilemma
    • Describe major historical figures, advocates, and events shaping today’s early childhood education
    • Explain the need for building partnerships with families and developing strategies for working effectively with families from a variety of cultural, linguistic, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ECED& 107 Health, Safety and Nutrition

    5 credits
    In this course students develop knowledge and skills to ensure good health, nutrition, and safety of children in group care and education programs. They learn to recognize the signs of abuse and neglect, responsibilities for mandated reporting, and available community resources.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe verbally and in written format policies to prevent illness in childcare settings, schools and other programs
    • Describe appropriate safety policies that prevent and minimize accidents for both indoor and outdoor environments
    • Apply skills in emergency first aid, food service, routine health and safety practices, and mandated reporting
    • Describe the role of nutrition as it relates to development, licensing, regulations for childcare, and government food programs
    • Create developmentally appropriate health, safety, and nutrition education materials and activities
    • Identify common indicators if illnesses/infectious disease and state in verbal and written format the steps to be followed to prevent and report illness/infectious disease
    • Identify the signs of abuse and neglect in children and explain the required licensing procedures to report abuse as a mandated reporter
    • Evaluate indoor and outdoor environments and develop a plan for improvement


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ECED& 120 Practicum - Nurturing Relationships

    2 credits
    In this course students will apply best practices for engaging in nurturing relationships with children. In addition, students will focus on keeping children healthy and safe while promoting growth and development.

    Corequisites: ECED& 105 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate appropriate practices that ensure and maintain the health, safety, and nutrition of children
    • Establish supportive relationships with children; guide them as individuals and as part of a group
    • Serve children and families in a professional manner
    • Demonstrate cultural competence and responsiveness within and across cultures
    • Create an inclusive, welcoming and respectful environment where all children, youth and families can take pride in their cultural identities, beliefs, and practices


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 30
  
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    ECED& 132 Infants/Toddlers Care

    3 credits
    Examine the unique developmental needs of infants and toddlers. Study the role of the caregiver, relationships with families, developmentally appropriate practices, nurturing environments for infants and toddlers, and culturally relevant care.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe developmental milestones from birth to 36 months articulating the influences of individual development, temperament, and cultural norms
    • Design a plan to create reciprocal, culturally sensitive partnerships with families.
    • Describe state infant/toddler child care regulations and procedures related to group size, health, nutrition, and safety
    • Describe guidance techniques that are appropriate and effective with infants and toddlers
    • Create and critique infant and toddler early learning environments
    • Construct a plan for developmentally appropriate, culturally relevant curriculum that supports language, physical, cognitive, creative, social, and emotional development
    • Identify resources supporting infant/toddler programs and infant/toddler specialists


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ECED& 134 Family Child Care

    3 credits
    Learn the basics of home/family child care program management. Topics include: licensing requirements; business management; relationship building; health, safety, & nutrition; guiding behavior and; promoting growth & development.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe family child care licensing standards
    • Evaluate specific practices, determining effectiveness in meeting children’s needs for maintaining good health, safety, and nutrition
    • Compare strategies for establishing developmentally appropriate, socially /culturally relevant, safe child care environments in the home setting
    • Design developmentally/socially / culturally appropriate plans and activities meeting the needs of children in multi-age groups
    • Describe and evaluate guidance methods fostering responsibility, independence, self-reliance, and positive social /emotional growth in children
    • Identify strategies for family child care business management including marketing, risk management, staffing, tax planning, accounting, and record keeping
    • Discuss strategies for family child care providers to balance the demands of operating their business with meeting the needs of their families
    • Identify resources meeting the needs of family child care providers and the families they serve


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ECED& 139 Administration of Early Learning Programs

    3 credits
    In this course students will learn administrative skills required to develop, open, operate, manage and assess early childhood education and care programs. In addition, students will explore techniques and resources available for Washington State licensing and NAEYC standard compliance.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and communicate an early learning program’s philosophy, mission statement, and corresponding daily practice
    • Create program policies and practices in compliance with state child care licensing codes, food program guidelines and accreditation standards
    • Plan for appropriate staffing, meals, equipment, materials, and programming for specific age groups
    • Employ a variety of strategies to maintain regular communication with families and provide opportunities for parent engagement and education
    • Plan a balanced budget
    • Identify methods for recruiting, hiring, evaluating, supervising and supporting professional development of program personnel
    • Use tools to evaluate program effectiveness and identify areas for improvements
    • Articulate and apply the NAEYC Code of Ethics


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ECED& 160 Curriculum Development

    5 credits
    This course is an investigation of learning theory and its relationship to curriculum development for young children. Students will focus on methods for planning and evaluating developmentally appropriate curriculum to facilitate development based on the needs and interest of children.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain major early childhood curriculum theories and current trends such as theme based, emergent, inquiry based, integrated and project approach
    • Use a variety of resources, including WA State Guidelines, program standards and NAEYC Developmentally Appropriate Practice principles to plan curriculum
    • Create curriculum which supports children’s language/communication, cognitive, social/emotional, fine/gross motor and cognitive development
    • Plan developmentally appropriate activities and schedules which promote child growth and learning
    • Observe, document and assess individual and group needs, interest and skills for the purpose of curriculum planning and on-going modification of plans


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ECED& 170 Environments

    3 credits
    This course focuses on the adult’s role in designing, evaluating, and improving indoor and outdoor environments which ensure quality learning, nurturing experiences, and optimizes the development of young children.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Design environments that protect the health and safety of children and adults, providing balance between activities that are indoor and outdoor, quiet and active, and allow for interaction with others as well as time alone
    • Develop environmental strategies for guiding children’s behavior helping them develop pro-social skills and the ability to self-regulate
    • Plan an environment, schedule, routine and activities that meet the needs of learners ages zero to 8, promoting growth across all domains and in all disciplines
    • Describe strategies to achieve compliance with Washington Administrative Code for licensed child care and/or other state/federal regulations pertinent to early learning environments
    • Compare policies and environments which recognize the importance of establishing space and programming that are welcoming to families and provide opportunities for all to participate
    • Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of early learning environments serving differing age groups (infant, toddler, school-age.)


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ECED& 180 Language and Literacy Development

    3 credits
    This course focuses on teaching strategies for language acquisition and literacy skill development examined at each developmental stage (birth-age 8) through the four interrelated areas of speaking, listening, writing, and reading.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define language acquisition and early literacy; describe developmentally appropriate literacy behaviors
    • Discuss the value of early literacy learning and the role of adults in promoting the “power and pleasure” of literacy
    • Analyze and select children’s literature and other learning materials for a population of diverse learners, reflective of all
    • Recognize and create activities/resources that support (infant/toddler through age 8) oral language development and early literacy learning
    • Describe a developmental continuum and assessment practices for documenting reading and writing acquisition
    • Identify strategies for recognizing and responding to academic, linguistic and cultural differences in children


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ECED& 190 Observation and Assessment

    3 credits
    In this course students will practice collecting and presenting observational data of children, teaching practices, and learning centers in an early childhood setting. Students will also practice reflection techniques, summarizing conclusions, and communicating findings.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe reasons for collecting observational and assessment data
    • Identify characteristics and signs of growth, development, learning, and social behaviors
    • Identify techniques for avoiding bias, judgments, and assumptions in observations
    • Collect factual, descriptive information using a variety of tools, i.e. running records, anecdotal records, checklists, time and event samples, portfolios and developmental continuums
    • Record information in an appropriate manner for future interpretation
    • Interpret the information as it relates to general growth and development and the specific children observed
    • Describe and demonstrate professional ethics and etiquette that applies to the collection and communication of observation data


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    EDUC 140 Diversity in Education

    3 credits
    Students will explore social justice issues and build cultural competency in an educational setting.  Students will examine in depth the historical and current impact of children’s, teachers’, and families’ cultural context in our schools.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  and ABED 046  or placement scores.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and define appropriate terminology in multicultural education
    • Describe and critically evaluate and communicate the social, political and cultural origins and manifestations of racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism/homophobia, ableism, and ageism in the current education system
    • Identify and critically analyze the cultural contexts that have shaped the student’s experiences as well as those of the children and families served in the educational setting
    • Explain the impact of bias on the healthy growth and development of all children
    • Define and describe the following approaches: anti-bias, multicultural, culturally relevant, and bilingual/bicultural
    • Design, assess, and adjust a culturally relevant anti-bias curriculum


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    EDUC& 115 Child Development

    5 credits
    In this course students build a functional understanding of the foundations of child development, prenatal to age eleven. Students observe and document physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of children, reflective of cross cultural and global perspectives.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss prominent child development research and theories
    • Describe the developmental sequence from conception through early adolescence in all domains using appropriate terminology and identifying characteristics of each
    • Describe individual and cultural effects, differences and commonalities in child development and nurturing practices
    • Articulate how family, caregivers, teachers, community, and culture influence development
    • Implement appropriate techniques to conduct and document observations of children as a means to assess and communicate growth and development


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    EDUC& 130 Guiding Behavior

    3 credits


    In this course students examine the principles and theories promoting social competence in young children and creating safe learning environments. Students also develop skills promoting effective interactions, providing positive individual guidance, and enhancing group experiences.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and differentiate developmentally appropriate child behaviors, individually and in groups
    • List and describe positive guidance techniques for children birth through early adolescence
    • Describe and demonstrate positive, respectful and culturally responsive interactions
    • Create a model daily schedule, routine and environment that provide support for attachment, self-help, relationship building, and exercising executive function
    • Develop strategies to promote social/emotional competencies and a positive sense of self
    • Identify and communicate strategies for professional interactions with families and other staff reflecting confidentiality, respect, and a positive approach to guidance
    • Compare and contrast at least three approaches to guiding young children’s behavior

     

    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
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    EDUC& 136 School Age Care

    3 credits
    In this course students develop skills to provide developmentally appropriate and culturally relevant activities and care, specifically: preparing the environment, implementing curriculum, building relationships, guiding academic/social skill development, and community outreach.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Develop a plan to create reciprocal, culturally sensitive relationships with children and families
    • Analyze the effectiveness of the environment and recommend changes reflecting the following standards: bias free, respectful of cultural and individual diversity; developmentally appropriate; promotes positive self-esteem and social interaction; and supports activity, involvement, initiative, responsibility, creativity and a growing sense of autonomy
    • Discuss the dynamics impacting behavior of children in after school care environments and identify guidance strategies promoting academic and social growth
    • Develop a plan for curriculum and program implementation that reflects responsive respect for the local community context
    • Describe state and local school age regulations and procedures related to group size, health, nutrition and safety
    • Identify resources supporting school age care
    • Identify resources supporting school age care/youth development specialists


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    EDUC& 150 Child, Family and Community

    3 credits


    In this course students integrate the family and community contexts in which a child develops. Students also explore cultures and demographics of families in society, community resources, strategies for involving families in the education of their child, and tools for effective communication.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication

    .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss demographic trends of children and families today
    • Identify influences on children’s development and socialization process
    • Establish tools for communicating and creating relationships with families that are respectful, inclusive and that reflect an understanding of cultural and community influences
    • Articulate the benefits of family-centered programs and the importance of supporting parents as their child’s first and most important teacher
    • Describe strategies for engaging families in their children’s learning and development
    • Discuss the importance of collaborating with other community programs to support the needs of children and families
    • Identify community resources and create strategies for connecting children and families to those resources
    • Develop environments that reflect family and community diversity that prevent bias


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
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    EDUC& 203 Exceptional Child

    3 credits
    This course examines the educational, social, and developmental patterns of children with special needs. Students explore the impact of disabilities on children, on families, and on their futures. Students will access local resources available to teachers and families.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  and ABED 046  or placement scores.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the history and philosophy of special education in the United States
    • Describe the primary conditions for which children need additional support for optimal development and learning
    • Explain the process used to identify children with special needs
    • Explain the purpose and components of the IEP and an IFSP
    • Identify and describe different intervention programs designed for children with special needs and local resources available to children and their families
    • Identify professional and ethical guidelines for early childhood special educators
    • Identify, research and apply effective ways to work with children with disabilities and their families


    Total Hours: 33 Lecture Hours: 33
  
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    EDUC& 205 Introduction to Education

    5 credits
    This course provides an introduction to the field of K-12 education, designed to serve the needs of those considering a career in, and those interested in a better understanding of the educational system. This course includes 33 hours of a required, supervised placement in an elementary, middle or high school.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the historical origins and philosophical beliefs of public education in the United States
    • Explain the nature and purpose of public education
    • Identify the current issues facing the State of Washington as they relate to governance and funding along with the impact these issues have on the classroom
    • Examine current issues in education, including the roles of unions, political influences, school reform, and school choice
    • Articulate the current requirements for teacher certification programs in Washington State
    • Examine the breadth of diversity reflected in public school populations
    • Identify current theories related to how children learn and relate these theories to possible implications for teaching
    • Identify and employ specific techniques for motivating students to learn, for dealing with disruptive behaviors, and for dealing with the challenges presented within the classroom
    • Identify and critically evaluate their own personal philosophy of education, professional goals, and positive communications skills when working with students, peers and supervisors



Economics

  
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    ECON 310 Business Economics

    5 credits
    Covers applied microeconomic analysis and introduces applied macroeconomic analysis of relevance to the business firm. Emphasizes the development of economic tools and concepts that can be used in the firm’s management decision-making process. Builds upon the standard economic analysis of the firm that integrates a company’s revenue, cost, output and pricing decisions. Marginal and incremental reasoning is stressed as an important decision-making principle.

    Prerequisites: TLM 301  and admission to BASTLM program.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interpret and analyze the principles essential for understanding the economizing problem, specific economic issue, and policy alternatives
    • Apply the economic perspective and reason accurately and objectively about economic matters that can be used in the firm’s decision making process.
    • Analyze applied macroeconomic issues relevant to the firm.


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ECON& 201 Micro Economics

    5 credits


    Examines the market economy including consumer demand, production, exchange, the price system, resource allocation and the role of government in the economy. Students analyze resource and income distribution, assess consumer and business behavior, and evaluate price determination and production cost.

    Prerequisites: MATH 098  or MATH 099  and ENGL 099  (or equivalent placement scores for any MATH& course and ENGL& 101  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Evaluate economic examples as related to personal incentives and voluntary exchanges
    • Explain the concept of opportunity cost
    • Define how traditional, command, and market forces affect the production and distribution of goods and services in a market economy and identify and analyze the interaction among these forces
    • Use economic reasoning, principles, and models to identify the possible causes and evaluate possible solutions for current microeconomic issues, such as productivity growth, wage differentials, and poverty
    • Compare and contrast the major traditions of economic thought as they apply to microeconomic theory and policy, in particular to the role of government in the market system.
    • Identify and explain the major forces impacting the distribution of income and wealth in modern U.S. capitalism, including the impact of discrimination
    • Identify and describe situations where market outcomes are socially undesirable, analyze the causes of market failure, and compare and contrast alternative remedies
    • Use graphical representations and economic models
    • Evaluate newspaper articles dealing with micro-economic issues 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

  
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    ECON& 202 Macro Economics

    5 credits


    This is an introductory course emphasizing how the markets operate from the big (macro) picture. The course covers measurement of economic performance, national income accounting, aggregate supply and demand, fiscal policy, money creation/Federal Reserve system, monetary policy, inflation and unemployment.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 099  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain  economic policy
    • Apply the economic theories to personal and business situations


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50


Electronics

  
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    ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I

    6 credits
    Electronics impacts all of our lives, this complete introduction to basic electricity/electronics principles with an emphasis on hands-on application of theory provides a solid foundation to anyone in the ” high-tech” workforce. A good look into how these electronics products really work.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) and ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use a Scientific a Calculator and Scientific Notation to perform basic calculations
    • Properly apply Industry Safety Precautions
    • Describe and use the Periodic Table of Elements as it pertains to electrical characteristics
    • Use Basic Formulas and apply the associated laws of physics for electronics
    • Correctly use Electronic Abbreviations, including the Greek Alphabet, Commonly Used Prefixes, Resistor Color Codes, Electronic Symbols and Semiconductor Schematic Symbols
    • Describe the Fundamentals of Electricity
    • Define Current, Voltage, and Resistance, and Power
    • Take Electrical measurements using a variety of Meters and standard electronics test equipment
    • Describe the fundamentals of DC Circuits
    • Define Magnetism, Inductance and Capacitance
    • Describe AC Circuits and Alternating Current
    • Define and demonstrate the ability to take AC Measurements as it pertains to Resistive, Capacitive, Inductive, and Resonant AC Circuits
    • Describe and demonstrate a working knowledge of Transformers
    • Successfully work in mixed teams to accomplish required tasks


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    ELEC 111 Computer Literacy For Electronics Professionals

    2 credits
    An introductory course, which develops an understanding of basic computer operations as they pertain to the electronics technical professional. Hardware and basic software applications are studied as well as industry specific software applications. Basic computer operations are studied.

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the basic configuration of a computer
    • Use a variety of common input/output devices
    • Explain the theory of the processing process
    • Detail storage devices and options
    • Differentiate between portable computer configurations
    • Describe the basic functionality of operating systems
    • Use basic application software, including Office applications
    • Use software applications specific to the electronics profession
    • Explain basic networking concepts
    • Use Internet search resources and optimize input using Boolean and other search parameters to achieve improved search results


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ELEC 113 Career Planning and Leadership I

    2 credits
    Focus on career objectives for the diverse electronics industry, leadership/ team skills, customer relations, occupational safety, hazardous material regulations, hiring practices and techniques, and workplace ethics unique to the electronics industry.

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • State the four basic properties on which electronics is based
    • List the branches of electronics
    • List the persons and companies largely responsible for the progression of electronics
    • Provide an overview of the Electronics Industry
    • Describe the duties of an Electronics Technician
    • Evaluate profiles of technicians
    • Describe the educational background of electronics professionals
    • Develop a career development portfolio
    • Explain the learning process for electronics students
    • Develop a personal inventory for professional development
    • Develop a plan for heightening skills
    • Develop a comprehensive plan for career search
    • Research a series of multinational companies and describe their internationally distributed design and manufacturing processes


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ELEC 114 Electronics Testing Processes and Techniques I

    2 credits


    A practical study of techniques and methods of basic electrical testing and parameter measurement. Component identification, technical methodology and practices that are utilized throughout the electronics industry are studied. Testing emphasis is on portable hand-held electronic test equipment, including VOMs and DMMs.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) and ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    ELEC 110  as either a prerequisite or corequisite

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Select and safely use laboratory power supplies for various applications
    • Describe the uses and operating principles of a D’Arsonval meter movements and safely use a D’Arsonval meter for an application
    • Select and safely use a DC ammeter and voltmeter for an application
    • Select and safely use an Ohmmeter for an application and describe the uses and operating principles of a Ohmmeter
    • Describe the uses and operating principles of a Megger and safely use a Megger for an application
    • Select and safely use an Analog Multimeter for an application and describe the uses and operating principles of an Analog Multimeter
    • Distinguish between the applications of a continuity test and an Ohmmeter measurement
    • Describe the uses and operating principles of a Digital Multimeter and select and safely use a Digital Multimeter
    • Determine need for equipment calibration and prepare calibration schedules for test instruments


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    ELEC 115 Electronics Manufacturing Testing Techniques I

    5 credits
    Introduction to techniques and methods of fabrication that are utilized throughout the electronics industry. Basic manual electronic manufacturing techniques, safety procedures, and shop practices and techniques are explored, as well as proper hand tool selection, care and utilization.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) and ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interpret and apply safety codes, policies, and practices, and accident prevention procedures
    • Apply recommended procedures for the safe handling, storage and disposal of hazardous materials using MSDS data to identify or label hazardous materials
    • Conduct safety inspections of shop environments, detect hazardous conditions and take corrective action
    • Use protective equipment and clothing to ensure personal health and safety in the workplace
    • Select, operate, and maintain hand, power tools and solder equipment safely
    • Apply basic soldering techniques including excess solder removal
    • Prepare common wire and cable assemblies
    • Repair sub-assemblies and replace electronic components on through-hole printed circuit board assemblies (PCBAs)
    • Apply regulatory and licensing requirements when completing installations, maintenance and repairs of electronic equipment
    • Analyze the soldering processes and the different types and applications of solder and solder flux
    • Select the correct soldering tip and temperature for the specific soldering and solder extraction application
    • Remove components using the following methods:  wicking, vacuum pulse; combination iron-sucker; heat and pull
    • Extract solder from:  through-hole mounted components; large thermal mass joints; terminals and socket mounted components
    • Install electronic components on single-sided and double-sided printed circuit boards following QA/QC procedures
    • Apply component handling precautions such as ESD precautionary techniques


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ELEC 116 Introduction to Programmable Logic Controllers

    5 credits
    Students will be familiarized with PLCs and learn automated manufacturing techniques and practices used to keep these machines operational.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 110  as either a prerequisite or corequisite

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interpret standard electrical control system symbols and codes commonly used in PLC operation and maintenance
    • Use both digital and analog Input/Output Modules with a PLC
    • Troubleshoot and validate Safety Circuits
    • Program Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for an industrial control application,  taking into account factors such as:  standard programming including timer and conter functions, data manipulation, program test procedures, and methods of implementing remote I/O operations
    • Implement communications and networking protocols used with PLCs
    • Analyze, implement and test a wide range of sensors
    • Interpret the basic characteristics and properties of fluids and solve problems involving fluids as it pertains to equipment operations and preventative maintenance
    • Analyze the dynamics of fluid flow and solve problems in discharges and viscosity
    • Interpret wiring diagrams, schematic diagrams and block diagrams as it pertains to equipment operations and preventative maintenance
    • Prepare and Maintain parts inventory and preventitive maintenance records and logs
    • Interpret and apply safety codes, policies and practices, and accident prevention procedures


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II

    6 credits
    Continuation of ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I  in which semiconductors circuits both analog and digital electronics are explored. A variety of hands-on lab activities with applications enforce the classroom learning.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 110 

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe Semiconductor Fundamentals
    • Describe and demonstrate a working knowledge of PN Junction Diodes, Bipolar Transistors, Field Effect Transistors, and Thyristors
    • Describe the use of Integrated Circuits
    • Describe and demonstrate a working knowledge of Optoelectric Devices
    • Explain the functionality of  Linear Electronic Circuits and Power Supplies
    • Apply Amplifier Basics to demonstrate the implementation of circuits in Amplifier Applications
    • Use Oscillators and Waveshaping Circuits
    • Define and use the Binary number System
    • Use Basic Logic Gates in practical circuits
    • Use various methods of Simplifying Logic Circuits
    • Test and implement Sequential Logic Circuits, Combinational Logic Circuits and Digital Logic Symbols
    • Describe and demonstrate a working knowledge of Microprocessor Basics


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    ELEC 126 Electronics Manufacturing Testing Techniques II

    5 credits
    Introduction to surface mount techniques and advanced methods of fabrication that are utilized throughout the electronics industry. Basic manual electronic manufacturing techniques, safety procedures and shop practices and techniques are explored, as well as proper hand tool selection, care and utilization.

    Corequisites: ELEC 115  

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interpret and apply safety codes, policies, and practices, and accident prevention procedures
    • Apply recommended procedures for the safe handling, storage and disposal of hazardous materials using MSDS data to identify or label hazardous materials
    • Conduct safety inspections of shop environments, detect hazardous conditions and take corrective actions
    • Use protective equipment and clothing to ensure personal health and safety in the workplace
    • Select, operate, and maintain hand and power tools safely
    • Apply basic soldering techniques for surface mount and socket mounted components
    • Apply ESD procedures when handling surface mount electronic components
    • Prepare common wire and cable assemblies for surface mount combination assemblies
    • Repair sub-assemblies and replace electronic components on surface mount printed circuit board assemblies (PCBAs)
    • Apply regulatory and licensing requirements when completing installations, maintenance and repairs of surface mount applications
    • Analyze hand, wave and reflow soldering processes for surface mount technology applications
    • Maintain surface mount soldering-station components such as solder tips, solder extraction tips and solder collection chamber
    • Select the correct tools required to perform solder extraction on surface mount assemblies
    • Remove surface mount components using the following methods:  wicking, vacuum, pulse, combination iron-sucker, heat and pull
    • Install surface mount electronic components on single-sided and double-sided printed circuit boards following QA/QC procedures


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ELEC 130 Electricity and Electronics

    6 credits
    Fundamentals of physics as it relates to electricity and electronics are studied. Basic DC/AC theory including basic and intermediate circuit identification and analysis are explored.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 120  

    Corequisites: ELEC 137  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the fundamentals of atomic theory as applied to electronics
    • Define electrical current and its rules, measurement units, and values
    • Describe and define the terms energy, work, and power and their units of measure
    • Describe the difference between a series and a parallel circuit
    • State Kirchoff’s current law
    • Describe the AC power distribution system from the electric power plant to the home or industry
    • Explain how information carriers are used to carry many forms of information on different frequencies within the frequency spectrum
    • List and explain the factors determining capacitance and inductance
    • Describe impedance, phase angle, power and power factor
    • State Faraday’s and Lenz’s laws relating to electromagnetic induction
    • Describe the basic transformer and its application
    • Identify the difference between a series and parallel RCL circuit
    • Define Resonance, and explain the characteristics of Series Resonance and Parallel Resonance
    • Identify and explain the differences between passive filter types including: Low pass filter; High pass filter; Bandpass filter; Band stop filter
    • Use complex numbers in both rectangular and polar form
    • Describe how complex numbers apply to AC circuits containing series-parallel RCL components


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    ELEC 137 Introduction to Semi and Analog

    5 credits
    An introductory study of basic semiconductor theory as it applies to electronics applications. Basic PN junctions through operational amplifier configurations and applications are explored.

    Corequisites: ELEC 130  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the fundamental nature of semiconductor materials and its application in modern electronics
    • Describe the characteristics of and differences between the half-wave rectifier, the full-wave center tapped rectifier, and the full-wave bridge rectifier
    • Calculate ripple voltages and ripple frequencies of all rectifier types
    • Describe the operation and characteristics of an IC regulator
    • Name the three terminals of a bipolar junction transistor
    • Describe the two basic actions of a bipolar transistor:  ON/OFF switching action; Variable-resistor action
    • Explain the meaning of the following:  Transistor voltage and current abbreviations; DC alpha; DC beta; Collector characteristic curve; AC beta; Input resistance and impedance; Output resistance and impedance; Calculate a transistor circuit; DC current gain; AC current gain; Voltage gain; Power gain
    • Define the following terms:  DC load line; Cutoff point; Saturation point; Quiescent point.
    • Explain the JFET operation, and the following characteristics:  VP, VBR, IDSS, VGS(OFF); Transconductance; High input impedance
    • Describe how to test the various types of FET’s
    • Describe the symbol, package types, and internal block diagram of the operational amplifier and its application configurations


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    ELEC 197 Electronics Capstone - Certificate Level

    5 credits
    All students are required to complete a capstone project prior to graduation as a final check of competency. Details are negotiated between the instructor and student to best fit the students’ individual area of interest within the field. This course is to be taken the final quarter of a certificate program.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission required

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize knowledge gained in the program to demonstrate competency in the field of electronics
    • Complete an assigned project from concept to final completion
    • Demonstrate for peers and undergo a peer review of materials, processes and methodology for their assigned project
    • Employ industry acceptable documentation techniques
    • Work independently and apply learned aspects of electronics to demonstrate competency in their chosen area of interest within the electronics industry
    • Communicate information to superiors, peers, and subordinates


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    ELEC 211 Digital Electronics

    6 credits
    This course covers an introduction to logic fundamentals, numbering systems, codes, gates, truth tables, DeMorgan’s theorem, basic Boolean theorems, and combination logic circuits including PLDs and PGAs. The course combines lecture sessions with intensive hands-on lab experiments.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 137  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Distinguish between analog and digital representation
    • Convert from the hexadecimal or octal number system to either the decimal or the binary number system
    • Identify BCD code, ASCII code, and Hexadecimal code
    • Describe the operation of and construct the truth table for the AND, NAND, OR, NOR gates
    • Use Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, and simulation software as tools to design logic circuits
    • Design simple logic circuits without help of a truth table
    • Write the Boolean expression for the logic gates and combinations of logic gates
    • Construct and analyze the operation of a latch / flip-flop made from NAND or NOR gates
    • Connect shift registers as data transfer circuits
    • Operate flip-flops as used to build frequency dividers, counters and shift registers
    • Use and program a PLD using industry standard software and modeling tools
    • Develop and utilize applications for Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs)
    • Use a JTAG interface to reprogram a CPLD


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    ELEC 213 Career Plan and Leadership II

    2 credits
    Continuation of ELEC 113 Career Planning and Leadership I . Focus on continued development of career objectives for the electronics industry including leadership/team skills, occupational safety, hazardous material regulations, hiring practices and techniques, and workplace ethics.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 113  

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • List the persons and companies largely responsible for the continued progression of electronics
    • Explain the process and people involved in the development of a product
    • Describe the duties of an Electronics Technician
    • Describe the educational background of electronics professionals
    • Practice fundamental human relations skills
    • Develop a career portfolio
    • Develop fundamental technical interview experience
    • Detail advanced learning options and techniques for technicians
    • Explain the process in securing a position
    • Update their personal inventory for professional development
    • Reshape their personal plan for continuing development in their electronics knowledge
    • Implement a comprehensive plan for a career search


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ELEC 214 Troubleshooting Electronic Circuits

    4 credits
    Covers troubleshooting techniques in a wide variety of circuits found in electronic systems. DC and AC voltage analysis are used to troubleshoot to component level in power supplies, bipolar/FET audio and RF amplifiers, oscillators, and op-amp circuits.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 137  as either a prerequisite or corequisite

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon the successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize the concept and use flow charts, step by step procedures and methodologies for troubleshooting systems
    • Discuss philosophies of repair for various situations
    • Describe the importance of block diagrams as an aid in troubleshooting
    • Analyze DC and AC for incorrect voltages applied to a circuit in order to locate the defective component
    • Describe the concept of signal tracing, signal injection, and signature analysis
    • Test and measurement of electrical parameters of amplifiers, oscillators, power supplies and op-amp circuits
    • Test and measure voltages of circuits employing a defective component
    • Analyze a system to determine the root cause of a device failure


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ELEC 216 Mechatronics

    4 credits
    Continuation of SOLID-STATE I. Covers AC analysis of bipolar small-signal transistors, including computer modeling of circuits. DC/AC analysis of large-signal amplifiers is also included. The course combines lecture sessions with intensive hands-on lab experiments.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 116  

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use both digital and analog Input/Output Modules with a PLC
    • Program Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) and embedded systemsfor industrial control and monitoring applications
    • Analyze, implement and test a wide range of sensors and apply transfer functions of a given sensor to correctly program a response from a system
    • Interpret the characteristics and properties of hydraulic systems and solve problems involving hydraulic principles as it pertains to equipment operations and preventative maintenance
    • Interpret the characteristics and properties of pneumatic systems and solve problems involving pneumatic principles as it pertains to equipment operations and preventative maintenance
    • Demonstrate an understanding of control processes such as closed versus open loop, analog versus digital,  and linear versus non linear control systems as it pertains to equipment operation
    • Analyze the basic dynamics of simple mechanical devices (levers, gears, etc.) and interface to electronics control and monitoring systems and circuits
    • Prepare and Maintain parts inventory and preventitive maintenance records and logs
    • Interpret and apply safety codes, policies and practices, and accident prevention procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ELEC 217 Data Acquisition and Analysis

    5 credits
    Course exposes students to data acquisition principles involving monitoring and/or controlling signals with a computer in a scientific, testing, or manufacturing environment. Students gain experience in real-world data acquisition applications.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 211  as either a prerequisite or corequisite

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the fundamental principles of Data Acquisition
    • Implement electronic instrumentation and basic measurement
    • Define process measurement and control
    • Demonstrate applications using real world sensors and input signal conditioning
    • Utilize interfacing techniques to the PC
    • Create programs to successfully integrate Automatic Test Equipment (ATE)
    • Cite and demonstrate proper techniques for displaying and analyzing data
    • Perform basic statistical analysis on data and arrive at correct conclusions based on data
    • Demonstrate proficiency in safety, lab techniques, troubleshooting within a team environment
    • Give and accept direction and constructive feedback from peers 


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ELEC 221 FCC/CET Preparation

    1 credits
    This course is designed to aid the electronics student to pass the FCC “General Radiotelephone” license exam (FCC Element I and III). Also covered are topics covered in the CET “Associate” level exam enabling students to be certified by ETA, International. Both the FCC and CET license examinations are offered at Lake Washington Institute of Technology for additional fees. See instructor for details.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 137  

    Corequisites: ELEC 223 

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon the successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe several of the more important FCC rules and regulations as contained in Element I
    • Identify and review electronic concepts contained in FCC Element III
    • Identify and review electronic concepts contained in the CET “Associate” level exam
    • Describe safety precautions as outlined in the CET “Associate” level exam


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10
  
  •  

    ELEC 223 Communication Electronics

    5 credits
    This course is an introduction to electronic communications covering topics on electrical noise, AM/FM modulation and demodulation techniques, transmission lines, electromagnetic wave propagation, antenna systems, and basic fiber optic techniques. The course combines lecture sessions with intensive hands-on lab experiments.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 137  

    Corequisites: ELEC 221  

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018, Fall 2018, SPring 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify noise sources inherent in communication systems
    • List the identifying characteristics of common oscillator circuits
    • Explain the concept of positive feedback utilized in oscillator circuits
    • Construct, test and observe the operation of an RF oscillator circuit
    • Construct, test and observe heterodyning, AM, FM and SSB generation in the lab
    • Describe simple modulation systems using block diagrams
    • Draw a block diagram of a superheterodyne receiver and correctly label all blocks
    • Describe the differences between  superheterodyne AM/FM receiver systems
    • Construct, test and observe the operation of a superheterodyne receiver
    • Compare AM with FM in regards to the method of transmitting frequency and amplitude of intelligence
    • Draw current and voltage distribution on a half-wavelength dipole antenna
    • Describe basic concepts of radio wave propagation
    • Describe several basic antenna systems
    • Compare Marconi and Hertz antennas by stating their differences
    • Observe standing waves (voltage nodes) on a dipole antenna
    • Calculate the resonant frequency of a dipole antenna
    • Describe the differences between resonant and non-resonant transmission lines
    • Describe basic fiber optic techniques used for data transmission
    • Construct, test and observe the operation of a fiber optic transmission system


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ELEC 224 Electronic Circuits

    5 credits
    Course covers DC/AC analysis of basic FET devices with DC/AC amplifier analysis and a study of the thyristor family. Computer modeling of FET amplifiers is used to enhance understanding. Also includes a study of frequency effects on amplifier operation, and a study of oscillator and regulated power supply circuits. This course teaches to the global outcome of Information and Technical Literacy.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 137 

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the operation of FET devices and their role in amplification
    • State common biasing methods for FET circuits
    • Approximate FET input/output impedances and gain
    • List the major parameters of FET configurations
    • Computer model DC/AC FET amplifiers and interpret the data
    • Construct, test and analyze the operation of several FET amplifier circuits in the lab
    • Name and recognize the schematic symbol of common thyristor devices
    • Explain the operation of a SCR and Triac circuit used to control power to a load
    • Construct, test and analyze a thyristor circuit in the lab
    • Describe the effects that frequency has on amplifier operation
    • Name several selected oscillator circuits by viewing their schematic diagrams
    • Construct, test and analyze the operation of oscillator circuits in the lab
    • Compare linear regulated power supplies with switch-mode power supplies
    • Describe the theory of linear regulated and switch-mode power supplies
    • Construct, test and analyze the operation of regulated power supplies in the lab
    • Use complex numbers in both rectangular and polar form
    • Read and interpret datasheets from a variety of sources, including the internet, and apply the data obtained to devices used


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ELEC 225 Linear Circuits

    5 credits
    Course covers basic and advanced topics on differential amplifiers and op-amp IC circuits. Op-amp negative feedback is covered. Also includes the study of several selected linear and non-linear op-amp circuits, including active filters.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 137  

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Model DC/AC operation of differential amplifiers
    • Construct, test and analyze the operation of a differential amplifier
    • Understand the operation and use of a typical op-amp IC
    • Construct, test and analyze the operation of op-amp IC filter circuits
    • Construct, test and analyze the operation of voltage comparators


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ELEC 226 Introduction to Automation/Electomechanical

    4 credits
    Operation and maintenance of an Automated Manufacturing Cell is explored, with plenty of hands on experience.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 216  

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interpret standard electrical control system symbols commonly used in  instrumentation as it pertains to equipment operation
    • Analyze and test  industry standard  motor control circuits as it pertains to equipment operation and test examples of stepper, servo, DC and AC induction motor drive circuits
    • Model and use basic sensors and their support circuits (proximity sensors, temperature transducers, flow sensors, encoders, position sensors,  pressure sensors, accelerometers, load cells, etc.)
    • Apply current loops and interface support circuitry for data transmission in noisy envrionments
    • Demonstrate an understanding of control processes such as: closed versus open‑loop, analog versus digital,  linear versus non‑linear control systems as it pertains to equipment operation
    • Operate  and test data collection systems such as those employing bar coding, magnetic, RFID tag technologies as it pertains to equipment operation
    • Operate a variety  of HMI (Humand Machine Interfaces) used in automation
    • Interpret flow charts and block diagrams as it pertains to automation operations and repair
    • Interpret electronic technical manuals and bulletins as it pertains to equipment maintanence
    • Prepare and Maintain operation logs as it pertains to equipment operations
    • Interpret and apply safety codes, policies and practices, and accident prevention procedures
    • Use a block diagram programming techniques to create algorithmic instructions for use by robotic systems and devices


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ELEC 232 Digital Electronics Lab

    6 credits
    Students apply previously studied theory and circuits in the planning, development and prototyping of a digital system. The digital system developed will have a direct application to an identified branch of the electronics industry.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 211  and ELEC 237  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize ROM, Ram, EEPROM or FLASH memory devices
    • Employ operational characteristics for Arithmetic Circuits
    • Develop and utilize applications for Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs) or Microcontrollers
    • Apply applications for Encoders
    • Develop applications including various flip-flops
    • Utilize the application of counters
    • Implement basic Microprocessor Architecture
    • Apply the application of Shift Registers, either independently or within a microcontroller or PLD
    • Utilize logic gates to perform arithmetic operations within digital circuitry
    • Utilize interfacing between digital and analog circuits
    • Develop an application utilizing digital electronics
    • Research the parameters and controls necessary to use a digital system to control real-world devices and systems.  Report findings in a standard industry document format


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
  •  

    ELEC 233 IPC-A-610 Certification Program

    5 credits
    Attain this coveted industry based Electronics certification. This training and certification has immediate recognition, legitimacy and value throughout the electronics industry. This certification will demonstrate your commitment to customer requirements and greatly assist any company dedicated to ISO-9000 or other quality assurance initiatives.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 126  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the role and responsibilities of Certified Technicians
    • Cite criteria for acceptable laminate conditions
    • Evaluate soldered connection requirements for plated-through holes
    • Evaluate surface mounting criteria for chip components, leadless and leaded chip carriers
    • Demonstrate swaged hardware, and heat-sink requirements of mechanical assemblies
    • Cite component-mounting criteria for DIPS, socket pins, and card edge connectors
    • Demonstrate discrete wiring assembly requirements
    • Cite solder fillet dimensional criteria for all major SMT component groups
    • Demonstrate an understanding of SMT soldering anomalies, such as tombstoning, dewetting, and other common assembly problems


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    ELEC 234 IPC/WHMA-A-620 Certification Program

    5 credits
    Attain this internationally recognized industry based Electronics certification that has immediate recognition, legitimacy and value throughout the electronics industry. This certification includes many aspects of cable and harness fabrication. Candidates must meet IPC requirements to attain certification. Students are required to pass the IPC/WHMA-A-620 certification to receive a passing grade.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 126  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the role and responsibilities of Certified Technicians
    • Cite criteria for acceptable soldered terminations
    • Demonstrate and evaluate applicable crimping techniques
    • Cite and demonstrate processes used for soldered termination preparation
    • Evaluate coaxial cable requirements
    • Demonstrate coaxial cable preparation and termination techniques
    • Demonstrate and evaluate wire-harness preparation and assembly techniques
    • Cite and demonstrate processes used for coaxial cable preparation
    • Function effectively in interactions with individuals, within group situations, and within professional organizations and systems


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    ELEC 237 Introduction to Microprocessors and Microcontrollers

    5 credits
    Introduces the microcontroller and its applications. Students learn how to program, analyze, troubleshoot, interface, and design electronic systems based on micro-technology, including industrial, consumer, and microcomputer systems.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 211  as either a prerequisite or corequisite

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the basic functions of the microprocessor
    • Identify and describe basic microprocessor  architecture
    • Create simple programs using computer instruction sets and block diagrams
    • Describe the operation and use of a microcontroller
    • Successfully create complex microcontroller applications both in hardware and software.
    • Download and run programs on an evaluation board
    • Implement a systemic approach to solving a control problem using modern micro-processing devices


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ELEC 239 Printed Circuit Board Layout and Design

    6 credits
    Introduction to Printed Circuit Board Layout and Schematic capture. Students will modify and create libraries from part datasheets and use them to create schematics and layout PCB’s for various circuits.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission required

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the basic manufacturing processes used in PCB construction
    • Describe the components, file types and the key processes (such as verification, design rule checking, and annotation) in schematic capture and layout processes
    • Use PCB schematic capture and layout software
    • Integrate the basics of good PCB layout, including calculations of trace width for current handling capability and impedance, to successfully complete a PCB design
    • Successfully create complex PCBs from schematic capture to output file generation (Gerber files)
    • Create industry standard documentation necessary for the production of PCBs


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    ELEC 297 Electronics Capstone - Degree Level

    4 credits
    Capstone course for 200 Level electronics classes and degrees. All students are required to complete a capstone project prior to graduation as a final check of competency. Exact details are negotiated between the instructor and student to best fit the students’ individual area of interest within the field. This course is to be taken the final quarter of a degree program.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission required

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize knowledge gained in the program to demonstrate competency in the field of electronics
    • Complete an assigned project from concept to final completion
    • Demonstrate for peers and undergo a peer review of materials, processes and methodology
    • Employ industry acceptable documentation techniques
    • Work independently and apply learned aspects of electronics to demonstrate competency in their chosen area of interest within the electronics industry.  The chosen area of interest is directly related to the certificate the student is expecting to be awarded
    • Communicate information to superiors, peers, and subordinates
    • Self-assess learning needs and design, implement, and evaluate strategies to promote intellectual growth and continued professional competence


    Total Hours: 80 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
 

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