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Lake Washington Institute of Technology    
 
    
 
  Nov 23, 2017
 
Catalog 2017-2018

MATH& 107 Math in Society

5 credits
Math in Society is a survey course in practical mathematics. Core topics of the course include proportional reasoning, probability, descriptive statistics, growth and decay models (linear and exponential), and the mathematics of personal finance. Other topics that might be addressed include, but are not limited to: modern geometry, trigonometry, sets and logic, discrete math topics (such as graph theory, scheduling, voting theory, game theory, or fair division), and math in the arts.

Prerequisites: MATH 098  (recommended), or MATH 099 , or equivalent placement score.

Quarters Offered: All

Global Outcomes:
This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

Student Outcomes/Competencies:
Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Use proportions and ratios to interpret quantities and estimate the relative size of quantities
  • Apply proportionality to solve and analyze a variety of multi-step contextual problems
  • Use formulas and perform relevant calculations pertaining to personal finance to solve context-based scenarios
  • Analyze and critique claims related to personal finance (i.e. loans, mortgages, annuities, etc.) to make informed decisions
  • Calculate and interpret probabilities, including conditional probabilities, and use those calculations to make informed decisions
  • Analyze and critique statements about probability and risk that appear in the media (i.e. advertisements, odds, medical test results, etc.)
  • Recognize and categorize methods for obtaining data, discuss possible sources of bias, and use this information to make an informed decision given a scenario
  • Use appropriate tools and strategies to describe and display authentic data (including boxplots, histograms, pie charts, and other graph types)
  • Calculate, interpret, analyze, and critique numerical summaries of data (including measures of center and spread), and use these values to compare and contrast two or more samples or populations
  • Analyze data and/or scenarios to determine if they describe linear or exponential growth
  • Create linear and exponential models for an authentic situation
  • Use, interpret, and analyze linear and exponential models to make predictions, discussing appropriateness and limitations of the model
  • Read a complex problem requiring quantitative and/or symbolic analysis, use flexibility in selecting a solution strategy, and impose an appropriate mathematical structure or mathematical procedure in solving the problem
  • Determine the reasonableness and implications of mathematical solutions, recognize the limitations of the methods used in context, and then apply those methods to making personal and societal choices


Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50