Catalog 2018-2019 
    
    Mar 05, 2021  
Catalog 2018-2019 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Nursing

  
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    NURS 108 Nursing Assistant Lab

    3 credits
    This course will give students an opportunity to integrate Nursing Assistant theory into practice while in a lab environment. Students will practice and demonstrate an understanding of the skills necessary to provide safe care to the health care client. These skills include: infection control, vital sign measurement, safe transfer, ambulation and positioning and feeding patients. In addition the students will practice documenting, reporting and communication skills.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Corequisites: NURS 107  and NURS 109 

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate ability to perform personal care for one client
    • Differentiate use of correct verbal and nonverbal language related to diverse cultural belief systems
    • Practice therapeutic communication
    • Demonstrate correct infection control procedures
    • Demonstrate accurate observation, reporting, and documentation skills
    • Practice proper measurement of vital signs, height and weight
    • Identify abnormal vital signs and weight changes
    • Demonstrate use of specific muscle groups to assist client with activities of daily living to avoid personal and client injury


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    NURS 109 Nursing Assistant Practicum

    3 credits
    This course will give students an opportunity to integrate the learning from Nursing Assistant Theory and Lab skills into the clinical environment caring for healthcare clients. Students will demonstrate safe client care through performance of nursing assistant skills in a healthcare environment. These skills include: infection control, vital sign measurement, safe transfer, ambulation and positioning and feeding patients. In addition the students will demonstrate accurate documenting, reporting and communication skills.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Corequisites: NURS 107  and NURS 108 

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform personal care for at least one client
    • Perform therapeutic communication with a culturally diverse population
    • Perform appropriate infection control procedures
    • Perform observation, reporting, and documentation skills
    • Perform proper and accurate measurement of vital signs, height and weight for the long term care client population
    • Perform proper body mechanics
    • Perform appropriate response to emergency situations
    • Perform beginning documentation of care
    • Identify Patient Care Plan and implement procedures as delegated by the supervising nurse


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    NURS 110 Introduction to Pathophysiology

    4 credits
    This is an introductory course in the use of critical thinking, the understanding of scientific knowledge, and the application of the nursing process to the physiological response in health disturbances.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Use Pathophysiology to understanding patient care for clients with physiologic disturbances
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Identify and discuss risk factors, etiologies, and elements of pathophysiology of regulation/control, oxygenation/circulation, elimination/nutrition, and protection/defenses
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Using appropriate medical terminology, explain aspects of pathophysiology, in stable situations with predictable outcomes
      • Use information technology to obtain information in regard to Pathophysiology problems identified (GO: Information Technology)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Differentiate between normal physiologic and pathophysiologic process
      • Use critical thinking skills to identify risk factors/behaviors that lead to alterations in health (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Recognize critical Pathophysiology states that would require immediate intervention
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Communicate effectively with other health care team members regarding Pathophysiology problems identified and share the outcome of the communication with patient and patient family in a compassionate manner taking into consideration patient cultural background (GO: Communication)


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    NURS 111 Nursing Foundations

    3 credits


    Introductory course in the fundamentals of nursing care focused to foster global and cultural awareness. Provides theoretical background and introduces the nursing process emphasizing the role of the RN.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Corequisites: NURS 112 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN (Quality and Safety Education for Nurses: QSEN - Patient Centered Care & Evidence Based Care)(Global Outcomes: GO - Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Understand holistic care (Global Outcomes: Intercultural Appreciation) (QSEN - Patient Centered Care, Evidence Based Care)
      • Identify populations (GO - Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Identify the members of the health care team and describe their respective roles (GO - Teamwork) (QSEN- teamwork & collaboration)
      • Understand the basic legal and ethical elements of documentation, confidentiality and patient rights that govern the role of the nurse (GO - Information Literacy) (QSEN - Safety & Informatics)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with diverse patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes (GO - Communication & Intercultural Appreciation & Teamwork)(QSEN - Patient Centered Care & Teamwork and Collaboration)
      • Identify the components of individualized patient teaching  (GO - Critical Thinking)(QSEN - Patient Centered Care)
      • Analyze the nursing process (GO - Critical Thinking)(QSEN - Patient Centered Care)
      • Evaluate the concept of patient centered care (QSEN - Patient Centered Care)
    • Apply the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies (QSEN - Safety)(GO - Critical Thinking)
      • Evaluate information management systems and resources related to evidence based practice (QSEN - Informatics & Evidence Based Practice)(GO- Information Literacy)
      • Explore the role of the nurse in a variety of settings
    • Apply clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status (QSEN - Safety)(GO - Critical Thinking)
      • Identity subjective and objective data collection tools and processes (QSEN - Patient Centered Care & Informatics)(GO - Critical Thinking & Information Literacy)
      • Evaluate nursing theory and the progression of ‘nursing’ clinical reasoning skills (QSEN - Quality Improvement)
      • Apply ‘Maslow’s Hierarchy of Need’ when prioritizing care (GO - Critical Thinking) (QSEN- Patient Centered Care)
    • Demonstrate leadership skills to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community (GO - Teamwork, Critical Thinking)(QSEN - Teamwork & Collaboration)
      • Demonstrate professional nursing behaviors (GO - Teamwork, Critical Thinking)(QSEN - Teamwork & Collaboration)
      • Commit to using knowledge of technical and information literacy to maintain a high level of professional competency during professional life (GO- Information Literacy) (QSEN - Informatics & Quality Improvement)


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
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    NURS 112 Nursing Foundations Practicum

    1 credit
    This course allows the student to apply introductory critical thinking skills, observe the nursing process, practice communication techniques, and demonstrate basic nursing skills in a long-term care setting.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Nursing AAS-T program

    Corequisites: NURS 111  and NURS 117  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Demonstrate the beginning development of a caring ethical and holistic view in client care situations (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care and promotion and functional patient outcomes
      • Utilize therapeutic communications when interacting with individual clients and significant support person(s) (GO: Communication; QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration)
      • Demonstrate effective communication when reporting and documenting basic nursing care activities (GO: Communication)
      • Utilize effective communications with health care team members in the coordination of care (GO: Communication, Teamwork; QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Apply understanding of professional role behaviors to various clinical situations (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Develop an awareness of critical thinking and the nursing process as the starting point for providing care (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate basic interpersonal skills needed to work cooperatively and collaboratively with members of the health care team (GO: Communication, Teamwork; QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration)
      • Demonstrate beginning practices that adhere to legal, ethical, and regulatory standards for the practical nurse (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice, Safety)


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    NURS 113 Health Assessment and Promotion

    2 credits
    This course is an introduction to the concepts of health promotion throughout the life span as a basis for performing a total client assessment. Critical thinking skills and cultural needs are included. Combined lecture and laboratory practice on a well adult.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Properly perform a systematic physical examination (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Organize and document subjective and objective data in an efficient, legible, and complete manner (GO: Communication, QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Conduct a physical exam using safe techniques and time management (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Safety)
      • Use medical equipment correctly (GO: Information Literacy, QSEN: Safety)
      • Use correct medical terminology to describe normal and abnormal findings (GO: Communication)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Interview clients effectively using the questions associated with a complete review of systems (GO: Communication, QSEN:  Patient Centered Care)
      • Use active listening skills and body language conducive to open and clear communication with clients and colleagues (GO: Communication)
      • Maintain a high degree of role competency through the use of self-directed learning and self-assessment (QSEN: Safety)
      • Exercise diplomacy, appropriate behavior, and accountability in all actions and relationships with peers and clients (GO: Communication, Intercultural Appreciation, QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Demonstrate sensitivity to and respect for diversity (GO: Intercultural Appreciation, QSEN-Pt. centered care)
      • Identify variances in a health assessment and design appropriate follow up actions (GO: Critical Thinking, QSEN: Pt. centered care)
      • Find and use a variety of reliable resources as a basis for projects and actions (GO: Information Literacy, QSEN: Evidence-based Practice)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Apply key steps in diagnostic reasoning (GO: Critical thinking, QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    NURS 116 Communication Processes in Nursing

    2 credits
    This course is an introduction to the principles of therapeutic communication and techniques for use with clients, families, and co-workers. Students identify patterns of communication and explore common barriers to safe and effective communication.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Explain the fundamentals of the Nurse-Client relationship (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Maintain a therapeutic Nurse-Client relationship (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate therapeutic communication to facilitate one’s own adaptation to new environments (GO: Communication)
      • Develop and implement therapeutic relationships with clients and collaborative relationships with members of the individual’s interdisciplinary health team while caring for diverse clients (QSEN: Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration) (GO: Communication, Teamwork, and Intercultural Communication)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Demonstrate the ability to communicate about sensitive subjects with individuals and families while acting as a health care team member (QSEN - Patient Centered Care) (GO: Communication)
      • Apply learned communication techniques with healthcare team members to promote teamwork (QSEN: Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration, Patient Centered Care) (GO: Communication and Teamwork)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Communicate effectively with special-needs clients while applying scientific knowledge in the nursing process to promote health and wellness (QSEN: Informatics) (GO: Technology and Information Management)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Apply learned communication techniques in professional relationships to promote teamwork (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration) (GO: Communication and Teamwork)
      • Demonstrate the ability to communicate about sensitive subjects with individuals and families while acting as a health care team member (QSEN: Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration) (GO: Communication and Teamwork)
      • Use critical thinking to determine appropriate communication strategies for clients and their families QSEN: PCC and EBP) (GO: Communication, Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Describe the ethical and legal issues relevant to confidentiality in communication (QSEN: Safety and Quality Improvement)


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    NURS 117 Skills Lab I

    2 credits
    This course is an introduction to the principles of therapeutic communication and techniques for use with clients, families, and co-workers. Students identify patterns of communication and explore common barriers to safe and effective communication.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Nursing AAS-T program

    Corequisites: NURS 112  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Demonstrate basic nursing skills needed to provide safe and effective nursing care: surgical asepsis, oxygen therapy, wound care, medication administration (QSEN: patent centered care) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Incorporate assessment skills and recognition of homeostasis changes in providing skilled nursing care activities (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Use the nursing process as the basis for providing care and troubleshooting (QSEN Patient Centered Care) (GO: Critical thinking)
      • Demonstrate respect for patient privacy, confidentiality, and autonomy (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care and promotion and functional patient outcomes
      • Demonstrate the use of effective communication in establishing the client nurse relationship (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO Communication)
      • Use appropriate terminology and effective communication skills in communicating with health care team members, care givers, and families (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Identify appropriate various infection control precautions (QSEN: Safety, EBP)
      • Maintain appropriate infection control measures in nursing care activities (QSEN: Safety, EBP) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Demonstrate safe handling of oxygen, infectious waste, medication delivery devices, and sterile fields. (QSEN: Safety, EBP) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Use proper body mechanics in medication administration and wound care QSEN: Safety, EBP) (GO:  Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Recognize and respond appropriately to clients experiencing adverse effects from oxygen therapy, wound care, medication and enemas (QSEN: Safety) (GO: Communication)
      • Use critical thinking in all decision making related to providing care and skills performance (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate ability to work cooperatively with health care team members to provide safe and effective nursing care (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Use technical and information resources to enhance communication and support effective teamwork ( QSEN: Informatics) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Discuss the role of the Nurse, LPN and RN in patient care decision making, implementation, and evaluation (QSEN: Communication)


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    NURS 121 Medical Surgical Nursing I

    3 credits
    The first of two courses presenting nursing care as it relates to common disturbances of homeostasis. Critical thinking skills and cultural needs of the client are introduced. Students utilize a systems approach to patient care.

    Prerequisites: NURS 111  and NURS 112  

    Corequisites: NURS 122  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care and promotion and functional patient outcomes
      • Use proper medical terminology in communicating verbal and written information to health care team  (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Communication)
      • Describe common disease processes (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Recognize effective communication techniques that promote client and family involvement (QSEN: Safety) (GO: Communication)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Identify key assessment data for specific disorders (Go: Communication)
      • Recognize manifestations of common disease processes(GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Identify appropriate nursing actions based on available assessment data and specific disorders(QSEN: Evidence-based Practice)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Describe the nurse role and responsibility in regards to legal and ethical considerations in client and family care (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate an understanding of leadership and advocacy traits that promote work place, client, and family wellbeing (GO: Teamwork)


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    NURS 122 Medical Surgical Nursing I Practicum

    3 credits
    This course offers the opportunity for the student to continue to apply and expand nursing skills, critical thinking skills, and communication skills in an acute care setting.

    Prerequisites: NURS 111  and NURS 112  

    Corequisites: NURS 121  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Describe common signs and symptoms of medical and surgical disorders in the clinical setting
      • List scientific principles underlying medical and nursing treatment of medical-surgical illness for an assigned client (QSEN: EBP, Safety)
      • Perform basic nursing skills and interventions consistent with established nursing standards and plan of care (QSEN: EBP) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Demonstrate understanding of the pharmacologic treatment approaches in the care an assigned client (QSEN: EBP)
      • Describe how principles of caring; ethical responsibility, and respect for human dignity are integrated into nursing care practices (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate accountability consistent with ethical and legal responsibilities of practical nursing
      • Demonstrate beginning client teaching strategies that foster holistic health promotion and illness prevention (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care and promotion and functional patient outcomes
      • Recognize how cultural, socioeconomic, and spiritual influences affect the client’s level of wellness (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Utilize technical and communication skills to obtain and record baseline data (QSEN: Informatics) (GO: Information Literacy, Communication)
      • Demonstrate basic communication skills when interacting with individual clients and significant support person(s) (GO: Communication)
      • Utilize appropriate communication channels and strategies in collaborating with the health care team to deliver care (GO: Communication)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Identify appropriate nursing problems for assigned client (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate developing organizational skills related to prioritization; time-management and follow through in the delivery of care (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Utilize accurate nursing judgment in the preparation, safe administration, and recording of medications to an assigned client (QSEN: Safety) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Evaluate goals for appropriateness and discuss in a small group process
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Demonstrate underlying nursing knowledge in setting individualized clinical goals
      • Utilize critical thinking to apply theoretical knowledge in providing direct care to one adult client (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Apply critical thinking and communication skills to client care, staff interactions, care development, and self-evaluation (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Safety)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate understanding of the role of the nurse in the delivery of care in a multidisciplinary setting  (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration, Safety) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Demonstrate interpersonal skills that facilitate teamwork (GO Teamwork)
      • Demonstrate an understanding of facility-specific informational systems and the impact of those systems on the delivery of care (QSEN: Informatics) (GO: Information Literacy) 


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    NURS 128 Skills Lab II

    2 credits
    This is the second of a two course series introducing the nursing student to the process and rationale of nursing skills and procedures. It includes didactic instruction and supervised practice of intermediate nursing skills in a laboratory environment.

    Prerequisites: NURS 117  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Demonstrate respect for patient privacy, confidentiality, and autonomy (QSEN-Patient Centered Care)
      • Articulate medical legal elements of documentation (QSEN: Safety & Quality)
      • Use proper body mechanics in all nursing care activities (QSEN: Safety)
      • Understand the role of the RN regarding technical aspects of practice
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Use effective communication in establishing the client nurse relationship (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Communication)
      • Effectively communicate clinical rationale for treatment to educate the patient regarding benefits & risks of treatment (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Safety, Critical Thinking) (GO: Communication)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Demonstrate intermediate nursing skills needed to provide safe and effective nursing care (QSEN: Safety, Evidence-based Practice, Quality)
      • Maintain appropriate infection control measures in all nursing care activities  (QSEN: Safety, Evidence-based Practice, Quality)
      • Demonstrate safe handling of all medical equipment (QSEN: Safety)
      • Demonstrate safe medication dosing & calculation  (QSEN: Safety, Quality)
      • Apply critical thinking in all decision making processes (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Incorporate assessment skills in implementing & evaluating the effects of nursing care activities  (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Expand on the role of the RN in patient care decision making, implementation and evaluation  (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Work cooperatively with health care team members to provide safe and effective nursing care (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    NURS 129 Gerontological Nursing

    2 credits
    A course introducing the nursing student to concepts and processes of assessment, care and health promotion for the older adult. Students will explore the nurse role as change agent in the planning and delivery of care in the older adult.

    Prerequisites: NURS 111  NURS 112 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Recognize individual diversity and unique needs in establishing teaching strategies, focused client health, and wellness promotion (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO:  Intercultural Appreciation, Communication, Critical Thinking)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Explain and discuss healthy aging, gerontological nursing history, education, and nursing roles in gerontology (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO:  Intercultural Appreciation, Communication, Critical Thinking)
      • Compare and contrast differences in culture, aging, and communication with the older adult (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO:  Intercultural Appreciation, Communication, Critical Thinking)
      • Identify the changes in the aging process with respect to the physical, psychological, cognitive, and social aspects of aging (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO:  Intercultural Appreciation, Communication, Critical Thinking)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Discuss promoting health, using Gerontological assessment tools, and medication management (QSEN: Informatics, Evidence-based Practice, Patient Centered Care)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Explain aging in coping with chronic disorders, in caring for older adults and their caregivers and continuity of care (QSEN- safety, teamwork and collaboration) (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with the elderly patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    NURS 131 Medical Surgical Nursing II

    4 credits
    This course introduces common disturbances of homeostasis across the adult life span. Students continue to build on knowledge gained in prerequisite course work in developing an understanding of disease processes and the role of the nurse in the care of clients with altered functioning related to disease processes.

    Prerequisites: NURS 121 , NURS 122 .

    Corequisites: NURS 132 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Identify holistic elements of care for focused medical surgical disorders including self care, prevention, and patient / nurse safety measures (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice, Safety, Quality)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Utilize information technology resources to access literature and appropriate patient teaching aids (QSEN: Infomatics, Patient Centered Care) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Identify key educational elements to present to patients related to focused disease processes  (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Recognize effective communication techniques that promote client and family involvement (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Communication)
      • Recognize learning deficits related to specific disorders and understand the need to incorporate them into individualized patient teaching plans (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Recognize manifestations of common disease processes when gathering assessment data for specific disorders (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Identify key assessment data necessary for assisting in the establishment of the nursing diagnoses for individuals with specific disorders (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Recognize specific actions to implement for both acute & emergent care and evaluate outcomes as related to focused systems (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Quality, Safety, Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Demonstrates an ability to integrate core pathophysiology and pharmacology with specific disease etiology of common medical surgical processes focused on the muscular/skeletal, neurological, immune, hematological, reproductive, and integumentory systems (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Quality) (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Identify the leadership role of the RN as care coordinator, health promoter, and collaborator with the healthcare team (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork) 


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
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    NURS 132 Medical Surgical Nursing II Practicum

    5 credits
    In this course the student continues to expand and integrate critical thinking skills, knowledge of the nursing process, communication techniques, and technical skills in an acute care setting.

    Prerequisites: NURS 121 , NURS 122 .

    Corequisites: NURS 131 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Evaluate principles underlying the medical and nursing treatment of single system and multi-system medical-surgical illnesses to develop solutions that ensure safe effective care in stable and predictable situations.(Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN): Safety & Quality Improvement)
      • Apply nursing skills and interventions that are consistent with established nursing standards and the individual plan of care (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice (EBP))
      • Understand and create patterns of practice which integrate the principles of caring, ethical responsibility, and respect for human dignity (QSEN:  Patient Centered Care)
      • Analyze and apply technical and communication skills to obtain, organize, and record data (QSEN:  Informatics)(Global Outcomes (GO): Information Literacy & Communication)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care and promotion and functional patient outcomes
      • Apply accepted nursing strategies that are consistent with the cultural, socioeconomic and spiritual influences of the client (QSEN: Patient Centered Care & Evidence-based Practice (EBP)) (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Utilize therapeutic communication skills that emphasize information literacy and cultural sensitivity when interacting with clients and significant support person(s) (QSEN: Informatics) (Global Outcome (GO): Intercultural Appreciation & Information Literacy)
      • Evaluate and utilize appropriate communication systems and strategies in collaborating with the health care team to assist in the management of individual client care. (QSEN:  Teamwork and Collaboration)(GO: Communication)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Understand and demonstrate accountability for personal actions that is consistent with ethical and legal responsibilities of nursing (QSEN: Patient -centered Care & Safety) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Apply client teaching strategies that emphasize information literacy, cultural awareness and holistic health promotion (QSEN: Informatics)(GO: Information Literacy, & Intercultural Appreciation)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Analyze and assemble accurate data to identify both normal and abnormal findings, to care for the individual in a structured setting  (QSEN: Evidence-based Care & Quality Improvement) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Create a systems approach to understand and apply pharmacologic interventions in the treatment of medical-surgical disturbances in a relatively stable situation (QSEN: Safety & Informatics)(GO: Critical Thinking & Information Literacy)
      • Understand and demonstrate accurate nursing judgment in the preparation, safe administration, and recording of medications for multiple clients (QSEN: Safety) (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Apply the organizational skills needed to deliver nursing care to multiple clients (QSEN: Safety & Teamwork and Collaboration)(GO: Critical Thinking & Teamwork)
      • Apply interpersonal skills which show collaboration with healthcare team members QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration)(GO: Communication & Teamwork)


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 100
  
  •  

    NURS 134 Introduction to Pharmacology

    3 credits
    A systems approach is utilized as it relates to pharmacological interventions by the nurse. There is an emphasis on client information literacy, cultural awareness, and issues involving non-compliance with therapies.

    Prerequisites: NURS 111 , NURS 112 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Apply legal and ethical standards related to the administration of prescribed medications (QSEN: Safety)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Initiate client teaching regarding medications that demonstrates cultural awareness  (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Intercultural Awareness)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence- based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Use information technology to access current, reliable information regarding medications ordered (QSEN: Informatics) (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Describe the basic mechanisms of drug metabolism in the body including absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion and how these are affected by human diversity (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Identify the mechanisms of action, adverse effects, and the nursing implications in administration of the major classifications of drugs including those affecting:
        • Regulation and control
        • Oxygenation and circulation
        • Elimination and nutrition
        • Protection and defenses (GO: Information Literacy)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Use critical thinking to determine effective nursing actions and communicate with other members of the health care team in relationship to clients’ responses to drugs (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration) (GO: Communication, Teamwork, Critical Thinking)


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    NURS 135 Mental Health Nursing

    3 credits
    Introduces concepts relating to emotional, mental, and behavioral disturbances and disorders of clients. Emphasizes basic concepts including legal and ethical principles related to mental health and illness, and the role and responsibilities of the nurse in the chronic and acute mental health care setting.

    Prerequisites: NURS 121 , NURS 122 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Recognize the components for an environment supporting a therapeutic and safe milieu for self, colleagues and the mental health consumer (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Cafety)
      • Describe the historical, cultural, sociological, and political influences on contemporary mental health nursing
      • Describe the major psychological and nursing theoretical frameworks
      • Recognize key legal and ethical principles in caring for a consumer of mental health care
      • Recognize professional boundaries and risk factors for boundary crossing (QSEN: Patient Centered Pare, Safety)
      • Recognize beneficial self-care practices for maintenance of own emotional wellbeing
      • Identify the respective roles and responsibilities of the interdisciplinary team in the mental health setting (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Identify the components of a therapeutic psychosocial nurse-client relationship in a structured environment  (QSEN: communication)
      • Discuss strategies for safe management of crisis situations that occur in various treatment settings incorporating principles of therapeutic communication and patient psychopathology (QSEN: Safety)
      • Identify critical patient teaching needs associated with the use of commonly prescribed psychotropic medications (GO: Communication, Critical Thinking)
      • Identify the roles and responsibilities of the RN in contributing to primary prevention strategies   
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence- based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Recognize potential contributing factors in the development of mental health disorders
      • Identify standard assessment parameters and tools used in the diagnosis of acute and chronic psychiatric disturbances
      • Establish a care plan based on the priority needs of a mental health consumer
      • Describe therapeutic nursing interventions for working with individuals who are experiencing acute and chronic psychiatric disturbances
      • Recognize evidence based nursing care strategies that protect the rights and dignity of this vulnerable population (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) ( GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Discuss the issues and needs related to selected age-related populations, those with a dual diagnosis and those with special needs (QSEN: patient centered care) (GO: intercultural appreciation)
      • Recognize coping mechanisms both adaptive and maladaptive used by patients experiencing a severe and persistent psychiatric disorder
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Identify typical signs and symptoms characteristic of the following mental health disorders (Anxiety, Mood, Psychosis, Eating, Substance abuse, Personality and Cognitive)
      • Recognize potential signs of an impending behavioral crisis (GO critical thinking. QSEN Safety)
      • Recognize the indications and potential side effects associated with commonly used psychotropic medications (QSEN: Safety)
      • Prioritize care strategies for patients experiencing co-morbid health states (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Recognize patient potential for violence including suicide and homicide (QSEN: Safety)
      • Critically analyze research literature to benefit an evidence based practice nursing approach (QSEN: Informatics, Evidence-based Practice) (GO: Information Literacy)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate awareness of the available mental health community resources including but not limited to partial hospitalization programs, PACT program, rehabilitation settings, crisis clinic hotline and support groups (QSEN: Collaboration and Teamwork)
      • Describe levels of prevention under the public health model and the role of the RN at each level (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Recognize an evidence based practice care plan related to mental health promotion and illness prevention specific to the needs of diverse communities (QSEN: Evidence-Based Practice) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Describe the historical, cultural, sociological, and political influences on contemporary mental health nursing (including but not limited to societal stigma, and disparity of resources)
      • Describe the major psychological and nursing theoretical frameworks


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    NURS 139 Mental Health Nursing Practicum

    3 credits
    This course covers care for individuals with psychiatric disturbances and their families in acute care, outpatient, and community mental health care settings with clients manifesting complex neurophysiological and psychosocial disturbances.

    Prerequisites: NURS 121 , NURS 122 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Maintain professional boundaries (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Safety)
      • Contribute to a safe, therapeutic milieu (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Safety)
      • Utilize strategies that support the nurse’s role as client advocate across the continuum of care (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate professional behavior and accountability consistent with ethical, legal principles and facility policies and procedures
      • Discuss the role of the nurse in coordinating multidisciplinary treatment modalities in the delivery of care in a mental health setting
      • Demonstrate responsibility and self-direction in pursuing short-term and long-term opportunities for learning
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Identify, discuss and under supervision (when applicable) demonstrate client teaching strategies that emphasize cultural awareness, and holistic health promotion
      • Utilize appropriate communication systems and techniques in collaborating with the health care team to manage client care and promote the treatment plan
      • Demonstrate therapeutic; client centered communication while providing client care (QSEN: Teamwork, Collaboration)  (GO: Communication)
      • Role model practice patterns that reflect caring, ethical responsibility, and respect for human dignity (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate technical and information literacy researching the internet to identify educational and client resources (QSEN: Informatics) (GO: Information Literacy)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Prepare a mental health nursing care plan with measurable, realistic behavioral goals based on identified actual and potential client problems, with a focus on priority needs
      • Integrate cultural awareness and diversity into the client care plan
      • Integrate underlying knowledge of systems and scientific principles in setting client goals (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice)
      • Demonstrate nursing strategies that are consistent with the cultural, socioeconomic, and spiritual influences on the client’s level of wellness (GO: Intercultural Awareness)
      • Perform basic and intermediate nursing skills and interventions consistent with established nursing standards and plan of care in the mental health setting
      • Prepare written documentation using professional and legal language, following facility policies and procedures
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Utilize critical thinking to apply the nursing process and theoretical knowledge in providing direct care to clients (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Recognize potential signs of an impending behavioral crisis (QSEN: Safety) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Recognize and respond appropriately per facility policies to risk factors and signs of impending violence to others or self (client) (QSEN: Safety)
      • Recognize the indications and potential side effects associated with commonly used psychotropic medications (QSEN: Safety)
      • Utilize scientific rationale and a systems approach in assessment, goal development, and the evaluation of nursing interventions (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice, Informatics, QI)
      • Utilize a systems approach to apply understanding of multidisciplinary interventions (including psychopharmacological and communication approaches) in the treatment of mental health disorder (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice) (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate awareness of community resources including, but not limited to, Partial Hospitalization programs, social services, PACT, crisis clinic hotline, rehabilitation settings, and support groups (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration)                                                                                                                    


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    NURS 221 Nursing & the Childbearing Family

    3 credits
    This course focuses on normal growth and development and nursing needs of the child-bearing family from pre-conception through infancy while presenting a holistic approach to the culturally diverse families. Nursing care related to other aspects of the reproductive system (STDs, Family Planning) is also included.

    Prerequisites: NURS 131 , NURS 132 .

    Corequisites: NURS 222 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Describe the evolution, scope, and professional roles of maternal and child health in nursing
      • Integrate knowledge of trends in maternal and child healthcare with the nursing process to achieve an understanding of quality nursing care (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice)
      • Identify characteristics of the full term newborn (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Identify changes that may occur in family dynamics as a result of the birth of a child(QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Use knowledge of diverse cultures to effectively manage care in the childbearing family (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care and promotion and functional patient outcomes
      • Describe the impact that cultural diversity has on family structure, function, and family roles (GO: Communication)
      • Describe family structure and health (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidenced based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Use information technology to formulate nursing diagnoses related to family health (QSEN: Informatics) (GO: Information Technology)
      • Formulate nursing diagnoses related to health care teaching appropriate for the childbearing family (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Use critical thinking to identify areas of care that could benefit from nursing research (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Use critical thinking to analyze ways that a client’s reproductive and sexual health can be improved for healthier child bearing and adult health (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Describe complications of pregnancy that place a pregnant woman and her fetus at high risk (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Identify nursing actions related to care of the high risk pregnant woman and the high risk newborn (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate increased self-motivation in seeking new learning experiences


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    NURS 222 Nursing & the Childbearing Family Practicum

    3 credits
    Registered Nurse student care experience with mothers, newborns, and families. Students acquire cultural awareness and information literacy pertaining to the new family unit.

    Prerequisites: NURS 131 , NURS 132 .

    Corequisites: NURS 221 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Describe the scope and advancement of the RN role in maternal and child nursing
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care and promotion and functional patient outcomes
      • Recognize factors that place a pregnant woman and her fetus at high risk for complications
      • Provide education to assist the diverse family with adapting to changes (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
      • State nursing diagnoses related to health care teaching appropriate for the childbearing family (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence- based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Develop nursing interventions appropriate to findings and diagnosis (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Develop, implement, and evaluate teaching skills to improve client’s reproductive and sexual health (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Use information technology to integrate trends in maternal and child healthcare with the nursing process to achieve quality nursing care (QSEN: Informatics) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Assess a family for structure, function, and family roles in relationship to health, recognizing characteristics that require intervention
      • Formulate nursing diagnoses related to family health (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Apply knowledge of nursing process in the acute care setting to provide competent nursing care to the childbearing family including the high-risk pregnant woman and newborn (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Use assessment skills to gather data regarding the childbearing family and communicate this data to the health care team (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Use critical thinking to identify areas of care that could benefit from nursing research
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate increased self-motivation in seeking out new learning experiences (GO: Teamwork) (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration)


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    NURS 225 Nursing of Children

    3 credits
    This course focuses on the growth and development of the child from birth through adolescence in diverse populations. Major childhood illnesses and community resources for family units discussed.

    Prerequisites: NURS 131 , NURS 132 .

    Corequisites: NURS 226 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN (QSEN: Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration, Patient Centered Care)
      • Provide nursing care to children, their families and community impacted by chronic and/or disabling deviations
      • Identify and provide age- and/or developmentally-appropriate nursing care to pediatric population
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes (QSEN: Quality Improvement, Safety, Patient Centered Care)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies (QSEN: Informatics, Evidence-based Practice, Patient Centered Care)
      • Describe the pathophysiology of selected common acute health deviations in the pediatric population
      • Identify the role of the nurse in assisting families to adapt to influences and changes as a result of adoption, divorce, illness, and children with special needs
      • Design and implement nursing interventions for the pediatric patient that incorporate developmental theories and reflect the developmental stage of the child
      • Design and implement teaching plans appropriate to the developmental and cognitive level of the child/parent that will assist in meeting the health promotion needs of the child
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status (QSEN: Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration)
      • Apply critical thinking to assessment of health, wellness, and protection in children, their families, and their communities and the impact of the sick child on the family and community
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with the patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Teamwork and Collaboration)
      • Discuss the importance of information literacy in supporting the family unit in management of care


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    NURS 226 Nursing of Children Practicum

    3 credits
    This course provides an opportunity for students to apply and expand their critical thinking skills, use of the nursing process, and communications skills while focusing on acutely ill pediatric clients and their families.

    Prerequisites: NURS 131 , NURS 132 .

    Corequisites: NURS 225 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Discuss the nursing implications of growth and development as they relate to providing competent nursing care for the pediatric client (QSEN:  Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration, Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate an understanding of culturally sensitive family centered  nursing care of the pediatric client
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Gather assessment data to assist in formulating nursing diagnoses related to pediatric health, developing the nursing diagnosis, writing the nursing care plan, and implementing nursing action (QSEN: Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration, Patient Centered Care
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with the patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration, and the wider community
      • Evaluate the implementation of nursing actions in providing care for the hospitalized child and the family (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Teamwork and Collaboration)


    Total Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    NURS 240 Advanced Skills Lab III

    2 credits
    This course teaches advanced medical surgical nursing evidence-based practice within the laboratory and simulation environment. Students apply critical thinking, prioritize care, refine nursing skills, and practice collaborative and therapeutic communication. Simulations and skills will entail complex health disturbances and scenarios to engage students with enhanced problem solving and practice.

    Prerequisites: NURS 221  and NURS 225  

    Corequisites: NURS 241  and NURS 242  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Evaluate nursing care involving life and death decisions within evidence-based, ethical, and legal frameworks
    • Facilitate therapeutic communication with patients and families
    • Analyze nursing diagnoses, implementation, and evaluation using assessment tools and nursing process while incorporating theoretical principals and pathophysiology to prioritize care
    • Apply subjective and objective data collection, nursing diagnosis, care implementation, and evaluation using assessment tools, nursing process and theoretical principals to prioritize care
    • Collaborate and role play safe and effective communication among health team members, family, and patient within a rapidly changing clinical simulation scenario


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    NURS 241 Medical Surgical Nursing III

    5 credits
    This course teaches advanced nursing theory, and scientific principles emphasizing clients with complex health disturbances across the adult life. Nursing research and evidenced based practice will be introduced, as it pertains to direct client care. Emphasis is on the nurse role in collaborative partnership with all health team members in developing and evaluating effectiveness of client care plan.

    Prerequisites: NURS 221 , NURS 222 , NURS 225 , NURS 226 .

    Corequisites: NURS 242 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Identify and discuss culturally competent care of the patient with complex health needs (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO- Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Develop appropriate, patient specific plans of care for a variety of critically ill patients (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Describe the nurse’s role in continuous quality improvement (QSEN: Quality Improvement)
      • Discuss the nurse’s role as health educator
      • Identify and discuss appropriate communication techniques to ensure effective collaboration with the patient, family members, and interdisciplinary team (QSEN: Patient Centered Care, Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Communication, Teamwork)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Discuss nursing processes surrounding clients with complex health disturbances
      • Research internet resources for evidence based practice guidelines  (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Evaluate web based resources for quality of content (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice) (GO: Information Literacy)
      • Explain the relationship between critical thinking and evidence-based practice (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Describe the nurse’s role in the setting of emergency care
      • Describe the unique aspects of the nurse’s role in caring for critically ill clients
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Describe the purpose and process of clinical pathways
      • Apply critical thinking in all decision making processes (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Explain the wellness-illness continuum
      • Demonstrate proficiency in clinical judgment in caring for clients with multiple health disturbances (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Describe the difference between a nursing diagnosis and a collaborative medical problem ( QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Demonstrate effective, professional communication in all nursing activities (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Communication, Teamwork)


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    NURS 242 Medical Surgical Nursing III Practicum

    5 credits
    This course provides opportunities for students to work in an acute care setting with clients manifesting multi-faceted physiological, mental, and social health disturbances.

    Prerequisites: NURS 221 , NURS 222 , NURS 225 , NURS 226 .

    Corequisites: NURS 241 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Communicate with all patients in a manner that conveys respect and adds value to the therapeutic relationship (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Communication)
      • Model practice patterns that reflect caring, ethical responsibility, and respect for human dignity
      • Demonstrate culturally competent care (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Demonstrate nursing strategies that are consistent with the cultural, socioeconomic, and spiritual influences on the client’s level of wellness (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Utilize a systems approach to apply understanding of multidisciplinary interventions in the treatment of client health disturbances (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration)
      • Demonstrate skill as a health educator (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Initiate and utilize technical and communication strategies to obtain, organize, analyze and record data (QSEN: Informatics)
      • Analyze signs and symptoms of unpredictable/unstable physiologic, mental and social health disturbances to develop appropriate nursing diagnoses (GO: Information and Literacy, Critical Thinking)
      • Utilize advanced clinical knowledge and skills to develop a comprehensive nursing plan of care (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Information Literacy, Critical Thinking)
      • Demonstrate proficiency in the implementation of interventions prescribed by the nursing plan of care(GO: Information Literacy) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Perform all nursing interventions in a safe and effective manner (QSEN: Safety)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Utilize scientific rationale and a systems approach in the evaluation of the nursing interventions (QSEN: Evidence-based practice)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate ability to work within a multidisciplinary healthcare team, and understand the roles and scope of each member (QSEN: Teamwork and collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Utilize strategies that support the nurse’s role as client advocate across the continuum of care
      • Identify patient and family as key leaders within the healthcare team (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Demonstrate a spectrum of organizational skills to effectively deliver care to a caseload of clients
      • Demonstrate responsibility and self-direction in pursuing short-term and long-term opportunities for learning


    Total Hours: 100 Lab or Clinical Hours: 100
  
  •  

    NURS 243 Leadership and Nursing Practice

    3 credits
    This course introduces the nurse student to the legal, ethical, and professional components of nursing. Included in the course is nursing history, growth of nursing, and current trends as applied to clinical and practice areas. Specialty areas within the profession will be presented and discussed. Nurse role as educator and leader, with a special emphasis on culturally competent care is explored.

    Prerequisites: NURS 241 , NURS 242 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
      • Identify the contributions of early nursing leaders & theorists as applied to today’s practice (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice) (GO: Intercultural Appreciation)
      • Identify the ethical & legal parameters of RN practice in relation to care elements & documentation (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration, Safety, Quality)
      • Identify the elements of professionalism & their application to nursing practice & personal career
      • Explore the influence of personal & professional values on decision   making
      • Differentiate between the leader/manager’s responsibility to advocate for patients, subordinates, the employer, the profession & oneself
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Describe how principles of leadership and management can be applied in nursing (QSEN: Safety, Quality, Teamwork & Collaboration)
      • Understand the RN scope of practice, including supervision & delegation in nursing leadership (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Identify strategies for effective communication and dealing with intra and interpersonal conflict (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Communication, Teamwork)
      • Discuss change theory and strategies to implement positive change initiatives (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration, Quality Improvement, Evidence-based Practice) (GO: Teamwork)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Describe the nurse’s role in relation to regulatory, fiscal, & organizational issues (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration, Safety, Quality) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Identify current trends in nursing and healthcare (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration, Safety, Quality, Evidence-based Practice)
      • Identify the relationship between nursing process, problem solving & decision making (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Describe the varied roles & practice specialties within nursing
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Identify factors that enhance effectiveness in achieving  organizational, personal, subordinate & client goals (QSEN: Quality, Teamwork & Collaboration, Safety) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Understand quality processes including, data tracking, trends, & root cause analysis (QSEN: Quality, Safety, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics)
      • Compare & contrast delivery of care models for efficiency & effectiveness of care delivery (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Explain the RN role in regards to collaboration with patient, family,  colleagues, the healthcare team, administrators and the community at large (QSEN: Teamwork & Collaboration) (GO: Teamwork)
      • Identify current trends in nursing & health care


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    NURS 244 Leadership and Nursing Practice Preceptorship

    6 credits
    This course is a clinical preceptorship in a nursing practice setting. The focus is on the student’s ability to integrate delivery of care with teamwork and leadership.

    Prerequisites: NURS 241  and NURS 242  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Holistically care for self, patients, colleagues, and community within an ethical, legal, and diverse framework within the scope of practice of the RN
    • Demonstrate competency in educating and communicating with patients, families, interdisciplinary teams, and systems with a focus on quality health care promotion and functional patient centered outcomes
      • Assess for and prioritize client teaching needs (QSEN: Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate effective communication skills working with interdisciplinary team members (QSEN: Teamwork and Collaboration)
    • Implement the nursing care process to demonstrate safe, competent and evidence-based care within a variety of settings using appropriate tools and technologies
      • Utilize facility specific inter-departmental information systems to support the delivery of quality care (QSEN: Informatics) (GO Information Literacy)
      • Apply the underlying principles of research methodology, and evidence based practice to the patient centered plan of care (QSEN: Evidence-based Practice, QI)
      • Develop client teaching strategies that emphasize cultural awareness, and holistic health promotion and patient centered outcomes (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Critical Thinking )
      • Implement teaching strategies that emphasize cultural awareness, and holistic health promotion and patient centered outcomes (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Critical Thinking)
      • Evaluate client teaching strategies that emphasize cultural awareness, and holistic health promotion and patient centered outcomes (QSEN: Patient Centered Care) (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Utilize clinical reasoning skills to synthesize patient assessment data, scientific knowledge, and pharmacology to safely manage a rapidly changing health care status
      • Apply the concepts and principles learned in previous nursing courses to implement a patient centered plan of care (QSEN: Safety, Patient Centered Care)
      • Demonstrate effective prioritization of nursing diagnoses and outcomes (QSEN: Safety, Patient Centered Care) (GO: Critical Thinking)
    • Provide leadership to effectively collaborate and delegate with patient, family, interdisciplinary, systems administration and the wider community
      • Demonstrate the application of nursing process as applied to a leadership role
      • Assume clinical leadership for the nursing care management of a prescribed caseload of clients (QSEN: Teamwork)
      • Demonstrate proficiency in implementing the role of the nurse as a coordinator of multidisciplinary treatment modalities for assigned clients (QSEN: Teamwork) (GO: Teamwork, Communication)
      • Role model professional interpersonal skills which facilitate and advance teamwork (QSEN: Teamwork) ( GO: Teamwork )
      • Demonstrate professional behavior and accountability consistent with ethical, legal and facility responsibilities of nursing (QSEN: Quality Improvement)


    Total Hours: 160 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 150

Nutrition

  
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    NUTR& 101 Nutrition

    5 credits
    This course studies the concepts of nutrition and biochemistry. It also addresses nutrition of different life cycles and diet planning as significant factors of health and wellness.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046 , or ABED 053 , or equivalent placement scores.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be:

    • Recognize the different macronutrients and micronutrients in terms of food sources, functions, requirement & recommendations, and deficiency & toxicity symptoms
    • Examine the anatomy and physiology of all systems involved in digestion including endocrine, urinary, digestive, etc.
    • Investigate current nutrition issues and popular diets
    • Analyze specific foods and/or diets using available computer software as well as correctly interpret the results
    • Predict the changes in nutrition needs during different life cycles, (i.e. pregnancy, infancy, adolescence, etc.)
    • Describe common eating disorders
    • Discuss the issues related to food safety and regulation and be familiar the impact that federal and state/local agencies have on our food supply
    • Assemble the vital components of a healthy diet by understanding the physiological impact macro and micro molecules have in the body and how this relates to health 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Occupational Therapy Assistant

  
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    OTA 101 Conditions in Occupational Therapy

    3 credits
    This course covers basic pathophysiology with emphasis on conditions most frequently observed and treated in physical rehabilitation and occupational therapy. Topics include etiology, pathology, manifestation, treatment, and prognosis of selected body systems.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175 , ENGL& 101 , MEDA 116 , PSYC& 200 , and admission to the OTA Program.

    Corequisites: OTA 101, OTA 112 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the underlying pathophysiology of conditions commonly treated by occupational therapy practitioners
    • Explain the tissue repair process
    • Explain the inflammatory process
    • Identify risk factors and behaviors that lead to alterations in the health of the following body systems: respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, nervous, pulmonary, endocrine, and integumentary
    • Differentiate between normal human physiologic and pathophysiologic processes of the body systems listed above
    • Identify the effects of immobility on the body systems listed above
    • Identify the effects of human aging on the body systems listed above


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    OTA 110 Foundations for Occupational Therapy Assistants

    5 credits
    This course includes an introduction to occupational therapy, basic theory and philosophy, ethics, and areas of OT practice. The student will craft a personal development plan based on the tenets of occupational therapy.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175 , ENGL& 101 , MEDA 116 , PSYC& 200 , and admission to the OTA Program.

    Corequisites: OTA 101 , OTA 112 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    OTA 112 Functional Movement and Kinesiology I

    4 credits
    The two Functional Movement & Kinesiology courses introduce the phenomenon of human motion and function within the context of occupational performance. A review of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems is offered. In the first course the students will analyze human joint motion, identify anatomical landmarks through palpation, and investigate human movement required for daily activities. Client factors, body functions and body structures, related to movement are studied as they affect performance in areas of occupation.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 175 , ENGL& 101 , MEDA 116 , PSYC& 200 , and admission to the OTA Program.

    Corequisites: OTA 101 , OTA 112 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe basic principles of muscle physiology and joint range of motion
    • Identify individual muscles with origins and insertions of the upper body
    • Describe nervous system components involved in daily function
    • Identify bone and joint structures of the upper body
    • Recognize skeletal and muscle groups of the lower body
    • Recognize, name, and replicate joint movements of the full body
    • Describe types of muscle contractions used for human activities
    • Demonstrate and describe basic biomechanics used in activities of daily living
    • Measure joint range of motion of the arm and hand
    • Test muscle strength of the shoulder, arm, neck, and hand
    • Recognize gait patterns and posture components
    • Demonstrate competency in identification and palpation of anatomical surface landmarks of the upper extremity, shoulder, neck and head 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    OTA 120 Professional Communication in Healthcare

    3 credits
    This course addresses effective communication and collaboration in today’s healthcare system. Students focus on written and verbal communication skills with emphasis on documentation. The professional opportunities for and the role of the occupational therapy assistant including that of leadership continue to be explored within the scope of practice.

    Prerequisites: OTA 131 , OTA 132 , OTA 140 , and OTA 144 .

    Corequisites: OTA 180 , OTA 211 , and OTA 217 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Communicate appropriately and respectfully with patients of different abilities and challenges
    • Write an effective Subjective/Objective/Assessment/Plan (SOAP) note
    • Describe the supervisory role of the OTR and the unique communication required between the OTA and the OTR
    • Function as a successful team member in OTA practice
    • Follow the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics
    • Behave and dress professionally


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    OTA 131 Human Activity and Occupational Performance

    5 credits
    This course allows students to exam the therapeutic value of purposeful activity. Occupation throughout the lifespan, the teaching & learning process, and activity analysis are explored. Applications of individual and group interventions are applied & examined.

    Prerequisites: OTA 101 , OTA 110 , and OTA 112 .

    Corequisites: OTA 132 , OTA 140 , and OTA 144 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    OTA 132 Functional Movement and Kinesiology II

    3 credits
    The two Functional Movement & Kinesiology courses introduce the phenomenon of human motion and function within the context of occupational performance. The students continue to analyze human motion in the second of the two courses. Students also develop skills in assessment procedures and therapeutic intervention addressing functional movement.

    Prerequisites: OTA 101 , OTA 110 , and OTA 112 .

    Corequisites: OTA 131 , OTA 140 , and OTA 144 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    OTA 140 Pediatrics and Occupational Therapy

    5 credits
    This course examines the causes, courses, and prognoses of conditions and diseases which occur in the span of birth through adolescence. The role of the occupational therapy assistant (OTA) is presented.

    Prerequisites: OTA 101 , OTA 110 , and OTA 112 .

    Corequisites: OTA 131 , OTA 132 , and OTA 144 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Differentiate normal developmental milestones and behaviors from delayed or  abnormal development
    • Identify and describe common conditions and diseases found in the pediatric population, such as  neurological conditions, orthopedic problems, sensory processing difficulties, autism spectrum disorders, mental retardation and other developmental delays, mental health diagnoses, and medical conditions
    • Demonstrate beginning-level competency in common treatment approaches for these conditions appropriate to the occupational therapy assistant
    • Describe three different treatment venues which employ occupational therapy assistants:  medical, community-based, and school system
    • Employ communication techniques appropriate to the client’s developmental level
    • Employ effective communication techniques with the client’s family and support system
    • Apply common theories and interventions used in occupational therapy to the pediatric population, with an emphasis on occupational dysfunction and treatment


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    OTA 144 Fieldwork Level IA with Seminar

    2 credits
    Creating an opportunity for professional growth, three Level I Fieldwork courses are scheduled within the didactic portion of the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program. The Level I Fieldwork experience allows the student to demonstrate professional skills while interacting with clients and other professionals. Students begin to assimilate academic coursework through observation and participation in three placements at various healthcare settings in the community.

    Prerequisites: OTA 101 , OTA 110 , and OTA 112 .

    Corequisites: OTA 131 , OTA 132 , and OTA 140 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 30
  
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    OTA 180 Functional NeuroRehabilitation

    3 credits
    This course covers brain/neurological functioning related to the occupational performance of daily life. Topics include neurocognitive processes, such as orientation, memory, visual perception, executive skills, judgment, and meta-cognition. The treatment and compensatory skills used by the occupational therapy clinician in practice are covered.

    Prerequisites: OTA 131 , OTA 132 , OTA 144 , and OTA 140 .

    Corequisites: OTA 120 , OTA 211 , and OTA 217 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring

  
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    OTA 190 Assistive Technology

    3 credits
    This course provides an introduction to assistive equipment including simple tools, seating and positioning devices, and computer use in therapeutic interventions. These assistive technologies are an important part of the practice of occupational therapy.

    Prerequisites: OTA 120 , OTA 211 , OTA 180 , and OTA 217 .

    Corequisites: OTA 218 , OTA 219 , and OTA 227 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create a piece of assistive equipment that can be used in an OT Clinic
    • Demonstrate the proper use of common assistive equipment used by OTAs
    • Present the different uses of assistive technology in treatment for persons with  physical, cognitive, and/or behavioral problems
    • Research computer applications for persons with disabilities and demonstrate competence in at least one
    • Perform a seating system analysis for a standard wheelchair used by patients; describe the clinical reasoning used to make any recommendation for changes


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    OTA 211 Mental Health and Occupational Therapy

    5 credits
    This course covers adaptations to everyday occupations needed by clients receiving occupational therapy. Assistive equipment, techniques, methods, and environments for a wide variety of client populations are included.

    Prerequisites: OTA 131 , OTA 132 , OTA 144 , and OTA 140 .

    Corequisites: OTA 120 , OTA 180 , and OTA 217 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    OTA 217 Fieldwork Level IB with Seminar

    2 credits
    Creating an opportunity for professional growth, three Level I Fieldwork courses are scheduled within the didactic portion of the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program. The Level I Fieldwork experience allows the student to demonstrate professional skills while interacting with clients and other professionals. Students begin to assimilate academic coursework through observation and participation in three placements at various healthcare settings in the community.

    Prerequisites: OTA 131 , OTA 132 , OTA 140 , and OTA 144 .

    Corequisites: OTA 120 , OTA 180 , and OTA 211 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 30
  
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    OTA 218 Occupational Therapy and Rehabilitation I

    5 credits
    This class provides in depth exposure to common medical conditions, physical disabilities, and the specific interventions and treatments used by the Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA).

    Prerequisites: OTA 120 OTA 211 , OTA 180 , and OTA 217 .

    Corequisites: OTA 190 , OTA 219 , and OTA 227 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify components of occupation-based treatment used with common physical disabilities or diagnoses
    • Demonstrate OTA skills related to the treatments of physical conditions seen by the OTA
    • Analyze case studies of physical disabilities
    • Identify environmental components of occupations which hinder or enhance health in persons with physical disabilities


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    OTA 219 Professional Topics in Occupational Therapy

    3 credits
    This course explores current professional issues in the field of occupational therapy and healthcare. The course addresses advocacy, evidence-based research, clinical reasoning, emerging practice areas, management, global and local healthcare trends as well as health and wellness as it relates to engagement in occupation and occupational therapy.

    Prerequisites: OTA 120 , OTA 211 , OTA 180 , and OTA 217 .

    Corequisites: OTA 190 , OTA 218 , and OTA 227 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    OTA 225 Occupational Therapy and Rehabilitation II

    5 credits
    Provides study in the occupational therapy process as it relates to clients diagnosed with various medical conditions. Medical and physical conditions and the impact of the conditions on occupational performance are studied. Application of theory to treatment planning and interventions to promote engagement in occupations is emphasized.

    Prerequisites: OTA 190 , OTA 218 , OTA 219 , and OTA 227 .

    Corequisites: OTA 226 , and OTA 232 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    OTA 226 Occupational Therapy Assistant Capstone

    5 credits
    Incorporates the knowledge and skill base introduced throughout the Occupational Therapy Assistant program. Reviews, connects, and applies occupational therapy theory, process, domain, scope of practice, professional communication, and the application of therapeutic activities.

    Prerequisites: OTA 190 , OTA 218 , OTA 219 , and OTA 227 .

    Corequisites: OTA 225  and OTA 232 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    OTA 227 Occupational Therapy with Older Adults

    2 credits
    Covers the theories of aging, components of healthy aging, common diseases and conditions frequently experienced by older adults, and the context in which aging and occupational dysfunction may occur. The role of the occupational therapy assistant is emphasized, along with the intervention activities and treatments used with the older adult population.

    Prerequisites: OTA 120 , OTA 180 , OTA 211 , and OTA 217 .

    Corequisites: OTA 190 , OTA 218 , and OTA 219 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    OTA 232 Fieldwork Level IC with Seminar

    2 credits
    Creating an opportunity for professional growth, three Level I Fieldwork courses are scheduled within the didactic portion of the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program. The Level I Fieldwork experience allows the student to demonstrate professional skills while interacting with clients and other professionals. Students begin to assimilate academic coursework through observation and participation in three placements at various healthcare settings in the community.

    Prerequisites: OTA 190 , OTA 218 , OTA 219 , and OTA 227 .

    Corequisites: OTA 225  and OTA 226 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 10 Practicum or Internship Hours: 30
  
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    OTA 235 Fieldwork Level IIA

    10 credits
    This course provides the first full-time (40 hour per week) 8-week clinical experience in a community, rehabilitation, medical, or mental health setting under the supervision of an occupational therapist or occupational therapy assistant licensed by the Dept. of Health, State of Washington.

    Prerequisites: OTA 225 , OTA 226 , and OTA 232 .

    Corequisites: OTA 236 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform activities required in an entry-level occupational therapy assistant practice
    • Demonstrate competence in entry-level occupational therapy documentation
    • Demonstrate competence in entry-level occupational therapy assistant oral reporting
    • Behave in a professional manner consistent with occupational therapy code of ethics, Washington State law, and the culture and norms of the clinical setting
    • Articulate the importance of purposeful and meaningful occupation to the health and well-being of actual clients


    Total Hours: 300 Practicum or Internship Hours: 300
  
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    OTA 236 Seminar IIA

    2 credits
    This course covers the practical clinical issues experienced by the OTA students during the first 8 weeks of the quarter. After the successful completion of the 8-week Fieldwork II Experience, students come back to campus for a seminar for directed discussion and sharing based upon actual clinical experiences. Specific course content is dependent upon each student’s unique experience.

    Prerequisites: OTA 225 , OTA 226 , and OTA 232 .

    Corequisites: OTA 235 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course the students will be able to:

    • Define and differentiate between occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant roles in the clinical fieldwork setting
    • Participate in a professional manner in group discussions regarding the effects of disease of disability on real clients, organizations, and populations
    • Define personal challenges and improvements necessary for success in the next Fieldwork II Experience
    • Participate in professional on-line education and communication opportunities


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    OTA 240 Fieldwork Level IIB

    10 credits
    This course provides a second full-time (40 hour per week) 8-week clinical experience in a community, rehabilitation, medical, or mental health setting. The student will practice under the supervision of an occupational therapist or occupational therapy assistant licensed by the State of Washington. This fieldwork assignment will take place in a different clinical practice setting than OTA 235 .

    Prerequisites: OTA 235  and OTA 236 .

    Corequisites: OTA 241 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform activities required in an  entry-level occupational therapy assistant practice
    • Demonstrate competence in entry-level occupational therapy documentation
    • Demonstrate competence in entry-level occupational therapy assistant oral reporting
    • Behave in a professional manner consistent with occupational therapy code of ethics, Washington State law, and the culture and norms of the clinical setting
    • Articulate the importance of purposeful and meaningful occupation to the health and well-being of actual clients


    Total Hours: 300 Practicum or Internship Hours: 300
  
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    OTA 241 Seminar IIB

    2 credits
    This course covers the practical clinical issues experienced by the OTA students during the first 8 weeks of the quarter. After the successful completion of the 8-week Fieldwork IIB Experience, students come back to campus for a seminar for directed discussion and sharing based upon actual clinical experiences. Practical preparation for the national occupational therapy assistant certification examination is emphasized.

    Prerequisites: OTA 235  and OTA 236 .

    Corequisites: OTA 240 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define and differentiate between occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant roles in the clinical fieldwork setting
    • Participate in a professional manner in group discussions regarding the effects of disease of disability on real clients, organizations, and populations
    • Recognize personal challenges and institute strategies necessary for successful completion of the national certification examination
    • Be eligible to take the examination for occupational therapy assistants given by the National Board for Certification of Occupational Therapy (NBCOT)
    • Find employment as an occupational therapy assistant after passing the NBCOT examination


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20

Philosophy

  
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    PHIL 301 Public Health Ethics

    5 credits
    This course focuses on ethical issues in public health and health care policy. This includes health care rights, resource allocation issues, individual autonomy versus population health promotion, privacy and human subjects’ protection in public health data and research, and the use of summary measures to drive policy.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    PHIL 305 Professional Ethics

    5 credits
    This course examines ethical questions that can arise for individuals working in business and other professions. Students will be equipped to identify the values that inform various professions and to skillfully resolve conflicts that arise between core value concepts.

    Prerequisites: Completion of an AAS, AAS-T, or AA degree or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the values that motivate professions like business, medicine, law or engineering
    • Describe the different ways that these key value concepts are interpreted and applied within the context of the different professions
    • Rationally resolve conflicts between ethical values using ethical theory, sound critical thinking, and an accurate understanding of the technical and cultural context in which the conflict arises
    • Demonstrate the ability to work with others in teams to negotiate resolutions to ethical cases drawn from such professions as medicine, accounting, engineering, law or management
    • Articulate clearly and persuasively one’s resolution to value conflicts using terminology and communication techniques that will give one’s proposals the best chance of being adopted
    • Explain why ethical practice is needed for healthy and productive professions


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    PHIL 321 Design Philosophy and Ethics

    5 credits
    An overview of the varied approaches to the study of philosophy from classical to contemporary is applied to the evolving design field. A study of common design terminology and semantics, applied with proper reasoning, is integrated into student projects. Ethical decision-making within the design profession is emphasized.

    Prerequisites: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission.

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Describe contemporary design theories and their philosophical and ethical implications
    • Demonstrate the ability to critically analyze work done by other designers
    • Examine ethical norms from various cultural perspectives
    • Develop the skills required for visual and verbal communication of design concepts
    • Define the designer’s ethical obligations as the message mediator between client and audience
    • Evaluate ethical issues surrounding the design of objects, services, identities, and experiences. 
    • Draft a personal ethics statement tied to his/her design discipline
    • Develop the skills that will foster perception, comprehension, and design of meaningful objects and spaces


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    PHIL& 120 Symbolic Logic

    5 credits
    A comprehensive introduction to symbolic logic, including its historical development, the structure of logical forms, deductive tools and techniques, the role of logic in language, mathematics, and philosophy, and applications in decision-making, computer programming, and silicon circuitry.

    Prerequisites: MATH 098  or MATH 099 , and ENGL 093 , or equivalent placement test scores.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify logical elements in natural and artificial languages
    • Determine tautological, contradictory, and contingent logical forms
    • Apply logical techniques to arrive at valid conclusions
    • Manipulate a symbolic language to arrive at deductive conclusions
    • Apply logical rules of inference, replacement, and quantification
    • Apply the mathematical skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, quantitative modeling, and formal logic to solve problems requiring reasoning, critical thinking, and rational problem solving


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Physical Therapist Assistant

  
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    PTA 105 Introduction to Physical Therapy

    2 credits
    Covers the history and organization of the field of physical therapy, overview of practice settings, behavior and conduct expectations of the PTA, and the role of the PTA.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Therapist Assistant Program

    Corequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 115 , PTA 117 , and PTA 125  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Relate an overview of the history of rehabilitation treatments, the field of physical therapy and the major factors that influenced its development in the United States
    • Explain the organizational structure of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA)
    • Name other organizations involved in the physical therapy profession
    • Describe the various settings in which physical therapy is practiced
    • Relate the APTA Standards of Ethical Conduct for the Physical Therapist Assistant
    • Explain the use and value of the APTA Guide for Conduct of the Physical Therapist Assistant
    • Define each of the eight Values-Based Behaviors for the physical therapist assistant
    • Describe the physical therapist patient/client management model
    • Explain the role of the physical therapist assistant within the physical therapist patient/client management model
    • Discuss how the APTA Problem-solving Algorithm and its associated controlling assumptions, the PTA Direction Algorithm and the PTA Supervision Algorithm guide how PTs and PTAs work together to provide safe, effective, and efficient physical therapy services
    • Explain the use and benefits of a resume and cover letter in obtaining a position in the workforce as a physical therapist assistant
    • Develop a resume sufficient to obtain a position as a student in a physical therapy clinical rotation
    • Define patient-centered care
    • Describe various college resources that support student success and when and how the student would use them
    • Apply study skills relevant to succeeding in the physical therapist assistant program
    • Apply multiple learning strategies to improve learning 
    • Identify the roles and significance of documentation in health care
    • Explain when to document, what to document and why the documentation is important as PTA provides patient interventions
    • Identify the categories of documentation content
    • Use appropriate terminology, abbreviations, grammar, syntax, and punctuation in physical therapy documentation and communication (both)


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    PTA 115 Procedures I

    5 credits
    Introduces principles and techniques of basic patient care skills. Emphasis is on patient safety. Skills include vital signs, aseptic technique, positioning and draping, soft tissue mobilization, body mechanics and selected physical agents with focus on thermal agents.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Therapist Assistant Program

    Corequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 105 , PTA 117 , and PTA 125  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use online and print resources to obtain information in regard to modalities used in physical therapy practice
    • Safely and effectively implement selected components of interventions identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Electrotherapeutic agents
      • Infection control / aseptic technique
      • Functional training
      • Injury prevention - body mechanics
      • Positioning /draping
      • Manual therapy - therapeutic massage
      • Physical agents
      • Thermal agents (heat and ice)
      • Ultrasound
      • Phonophoresis 
      • Diathermy
      • Whirlpool
    • Safely and effectively perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Interview patients/clients, caregivers and family to obtain current information related to prior and current level of function and general health status
      • Vital signs
      • Anthropometric characteristics
      • Pain
      • Posture
    • When providing interventions and associated data collection techniques:
      • Display professional behaviors consistent with the expectations of the physical therapy profession
      • Protect patient modesty, privacy, and dignity
      • Apply current physical therapy knowledge, theory and clinical judgement
      • Consider the patient/client perspective and treatment environment.
      • Provide clear instructions, when educating patients, as directed by the supervising physical therapist  
      • Explain the rationale for selected interventions to achieve patient goals as identified in the plan of care
      • Review health records prior to carrying out the plan of care.
      • Monitor and adjust interventions within the plan of care in response to patient/client status and clinical indications
      • Report any changes in patient status or progress to the supervising physical therapist
      • Identify indications, contraindications, precautions and safety considerations for the patient and determine if the treatment intervention is appropriate
      • Determine when a directed intervention is either beyond the scope of work or personal scope of work of a physical therapist assistant
      • Recognize activities, positioning and posture that aggravate or relieve pain
      • Select relevant information for documentation
      • Prepare and maintain a safe working environment
      • Handle patients using safe techniques and appropriate body mechanics
      • As appropriate to the PTA, maintain and use physical therapy equipment safely and effectively
      • Provide patient centered care


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    PTA 117 Pathophysiology

    3 credits
    Survey of human pathophysiology covering common pathologies of major body systems. Emphasis on connecting the key elements of pathology and disease to working with patients as a PTA.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Therapist Assistant Program

    Corequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 105 , PTA 115 , and PTA 125  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Differentiate between selected normal human physiologic and pathophysiologic processes of selected body systems
    • Identify etiology, pathology, manifestation, treatment and prognosis of pathophysiology of selected body systems
    • Describe the physiological mechanisms of injury at the cellular level, including necrosis and the inflammatory response
    • Describe the physiology of the tissue repair process
    • Identify characteristic signs and symptoms of common disorders and diseases
    • Identify the negative effects of immobility on selected body systems
    • Identify special considerations for providing safe and effective physical therapy interventions for patients with pathological conditions


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    PTA 125 Kinesiology I

    4 credits
    Principles of kinesiology including osteokinematics, arthrokinematics, force, torque, and levers as applied to human movement. In-depth study of musculoskeletal anatomy and kinesiology with a focus on application to physical therapy.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Therapist Assistant Program

    Corequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 105 , PTA 115 , and PTA 117  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    PTA 126 Kinesiology II

    5 credits
    Continuation of in-depth study of musculoskeletal anatomy and kinesiology. Course also covers principles of typical gait, basic gait analysis techniques and common gait deviations.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 105 , PTA 115 , PTA 117 , and PTA 125  

    Corequisites: PTA 135 , PTA 145 , and PTA 155  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use common anatomic and kinesiologic terminology when describing human motion or position
    • Describe the alignment and position of the trunk and lower extremities at rest and during activities
    • Accurately identify and palpate anatomical surface landmarks for the lower extremity and trunk
    • Apply knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy and kinesiology to basic principles of movement, stretching, and activation of the muscles of the lower extremity and trunk
    • Identify the bones and primary bony features relevant to joints of the lower extremity and trunk
    • Describe the location and primary function of supporting structures for joints
    • Cite the normal ranges of motion for joints in the human body
    • Cite the proximal and distal attachments, actions, and innervations of the muscles of the body associated with joints of the lower extremity and trunk commonly treated in physical therapy
    • Explain primary muscular interactions in common body motions especially those of the trunk and lower extremities
    • Identify the components of the normal gait cycle
    • Describe the muscular and joint interactions that occur during the gait cycle
    • Define terminology related to and used to describe human gait
    • Perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the PT related to gait using common gait analysis techniques
    • Describe common atypical gait patterns


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    PTA 135 Topics in Physical Therapy I

    3 credits
    Communication skills for the PTA including written documentation, plan of care review, recognizing and responding to individual and cultural differences, interpersonal communication, educating patients and caregivers, and educating others about the role of the PTA.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 105 , PTA 115 , PTA 117 , and PTA 125  

    Corequisites: PTA 126 PTA 145 , and PTA 155  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define model of disablement
    • Discuss how models of disablement are relevant to the role of the PTA
    • Use the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) to describe a patient’s situation and status
    • Discuss the importance of privacy and confidentiality in healthcare
    • Discuss patient confidentiality guidelines and requirements and relate these requirements to HIPAA practices
    • Identify the roles and significance of documentation in health care
    • Explain when to document, what to document and why the documentation is important as PTA provides patient interventions
    • Identify the categories of documentation content
    • Recognize various physical therapy documentation formats
    • Locate relevant information in the medical record
    • Compare and contrast all parts of the SOAP note for physical therapy documentation
    • Use an organized and logical framework to document patient care
    • Use language for physical therapy documentation that is accurate, complete, legible, timely, and consistent with institutional, legal, and billing requirements
    • Use appropriate terminology, abbreviations, grammar, syntax, and punctuation in physical therapy documentation and communication
    • Appropriately correct charting errors
    • Document physical therapy services provided including the appropriate elements of:
      • Patient/client self-report
      • Identification of specific intervention(s) provided
      • Frequency, duration, and intensity
      • Equipment provided
      • Changes in patient/client impairment, functional limitation and disability status as they relate to the plan of care
      • Response to interventions including, adverse reactions to interventions, if any
      • Factors that modify frequency or intensity of intervention and progression goals, including patient/client adherence to patient/client-related instructions
      • Communication with physical therapists, patients/clients, caregivers, and other healthcare team members
      • Indication of no-show or cancellation
    • Demonstrate an awareness of one’s own communication (verbal and non-verbal) style and its impact upon communication with the patient, physical therapist and other healthcare personnel
    • Discuss the interpersonal and communication skills involved in establishing a therapeutic relationship with a patient
    • Discuss the role and impact of individual and cultural differences in the provision of physical therapy services
    • Recognize individual and cultural differences
    • Identify culturally sensitive responses to a variety of patient-care scenarios
    • Locate resources to inform an appropriate and sensitive response to individual and cultural differences
    • Identify, respect, and act with consideration for patients’/clients’ differences, values, preferences, and expressed needs in all work-related activities
    • Demonstrate an awareness of social responsibility and advocacy, including participation in professional and community organizations and activities
    • Describe basic teaching and learning principles and their application to rehabilitation
    • Apply principles of learning using a variety of teaching strategies during instruction of patients, caregivers and other members of the health care team
    • Educate others about the role of the physical therapist assistant
    • Educate others using teaching methods that are commensurate with the needs of the patient or caregiver


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    PTA 136 Topics in Physical Therapy II

    3 credits


    Course covers administrative skills relevant to the PTA including accurate and timely billing, resource management, managing productivity, and an overview of payment systems. Additional topics include skills for reading healthcare literature and the APTA Guide to PT Practice.

    Prerequisites: PTA 126 , PTA 135 , PTA 145 , and PTA 155  

    Corequisites: PTA 146  and PTA 156  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use online and print resources to find current laws, regulations, and policies that apply to physical therapy, physical therapists and physical therapist assistants 
    • Describe how current healthcare laws, regulations, and policies affect physical therapist assistants
    • Collect relevant healthcare literature using print and online research tools
    • Identify basic concepts in professional literature including validity, reliability and level of statistical significance
    • Generalize the main ideas of a piece of relevant healthcare literature and how they apply to the clinical work of a physical therapist assistant
    • Explain the relevance and importance of resource management in physical therapy
    • Discuss implications of providing accurate and timely information for billing and reimbursement purposes
    • Describe aspects of practice management including organizational planning and operation of the physical therapy service
    • Discuss legal practice standards, including federal, state, and institutional regulations related to patient care and fiscal management
    • Define and give examples of billing fraud, waste and abuse related to physical therapy
    • Identify ways to prevent billing fraud, waste, and abuse in the field of physical therapy
    • Identify resources and reporting actions if a PTA identifies fraud, waste, or abuse related to the utilization of and payment for physical therapy and other health care services
    • Self-assess professional behaviors including interpersonal skills, communication skills, use of constructive feedback, professionalism, responsibility, and stress management
    • Differentiate the roles and responsibilities of other health care providers in patient-centered care
    • Employ appropriate etiquette when using electronic communication tools in professional communications
    • Identify the components of the PTA Clinical Performance Instrument (CPI) and their correct application


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
  •  

    PTA 145 Orthopedics I

    5 credits
    Principles of therapeutic exercise and intervention skills for aerobic conditioning, agility training, postural awareness and stabilization, strengthening, flexibility and electrotherapeutic modalities. Data collection skills for joint movement and muscle performance. Review of pathology and application of skills for common musculoskeletal conditions.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 105 , PTA 115  , PTA 117 , and PTA 125  

    Corequisites: PTA 126 , PTA 135 , and PTA 155  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe physiological responses during exercise
    • Identify adaptations and changes in anatomy and physiology as a result of exercise
    • Explain physiological responses to diminished activity
    • Explain general healing mechanisms for specific tissue types including bone and soft tissue healing
    • Apply concepts of anatomy, biomechanics, pathophysiology, and exercise physiology to implement safe and effective therapeutic exercise interventions within the plan of care
    • Describe the effects of electrical currents in the application of electrotherapeutic modality interventions
    • Implement selected components of electrotherapeutic modality interventions as identified within the plan of care established by the physical therapist
    • Implement selected components of intervention techniques including:
      • Interview patients/clients, caregivers and family to obtain current information related to prior and current level of function and general health status
      • Therapeutic exercise
      • Aerobic capacity / endurance conditioning and reconditioning
      • Breathing and relaxation strategies relevant to the intervention
      • Body mechanics and postural training
      • Manual therapy - passive range of motion
      • Flexibility exercises
      • Coordination and agility training
      • Strength, power, and endurance training
    • Perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Aerobic capacity and endurance
      • Electrotherapeutic agents
      • Functional range of motion
      • Joint range of motion
      • Joint integrity and mobility
      • Muscle length
      • Muscle function and performance
      • Location and intensity of pain
      • Posture and body mechanics
    • When providing interventions and associated data collection techniques:
      • Display professional behaviors consistent with the expectations of the physical therapy profession
      • Protect patient modesty, privacy, and dignity
      • Apply current physical therapy knowledge, theory and clinical judgement
      • Consider the patient/client perspective and treatment environment.
      • Provide clear instructions, apply principles of learning, and use a variety of teaching strategies when educating patients, caregivers, and other members of the health care team as directed by the supervising physical therapist
      • Explain the rationale for selected interventions to achieve patient goals as identified in the plan of care
      • Review health records prior to carrying out the plan of care.
      • Monitor and adjust interventions within the plan of care in response to patient/client status and clinical indications
      • Report any changes in patient status or progress to the supervising physical therapist
      • Identify indications, contraindications, precautions and safety considerations for the patient and determine if the treatment intervention is appropriate
      • Determine when a directed intervention is either beyond the scope of work or personal scope of work of a physical therapist assistant
      • Identify relevant information to communicate to the physical therapist for the discharge planning process
      • Recognize activities, positioning and posture that aggravate or relieve pain
      • Select relevant information for documentation
      • Prepare and maintain a safe working environment
      • Handle patients using safe techniques and appropriate body mechanics
      • Select relevant information for documentation and billing purposes  
      • As appropriate to the PTA, maintain and use physical therapy equipment safely and effectively
      • Provide patient centered care


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    PTA 146 Orthopedics II

    7 credits


    This course covers the application of concepts and skills from Orthopedics I to musculoskeletal conditions of the upper extremity, spine, and lower extremity.

    Prerequisites: PTA 126 , PTA 135 , PTA 145 , and PTA 155  

    Students must meet with a faculty adviser prior to registration.

    Corequisites: PTA 136  and PTA 156  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe common soft tissue injuries, fractures, and diseases of the foot and ankle, knee, hip, spine, pelvis, shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand
    • Identify and integrate appropriate evidence-based resources to support clinical decision-making for progression of the patient within the plan of care established by the PT
    • Describe clinically relevant physical therapy interventions used during periods of
      • muscle injury, repair, and immobilization
      • tendon and ligament healing
      • bone and cartilage healing
    • Implement selected components of interventions for patients with musculoskeletal disorders as identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Body mechanics and postural training
      • Biofeedback
      • Manual therapy techniques - soft tissue mobilization
      • Mechanical modalities
      • Therapeutic exercise
      • Coordination and agility training
      • Flexibility exercises
      • Strength, power, and endurance training
    • Perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Interview patients/clients, caregivers and family to obtain current information related to prior and current level of function and general health status
      • Posture and body mechanics
      • Location and intensity of pain
      • Joint integrity and mobility
      • Range of motion
      • Muscle performance
    • When providing interventions and associated data collection techniques:
      • Display professional behaviors consistent with the expectations of the physical therapy profession
      • Protect patient modesty, privacy, and dignity
      • Apply current physical therapy knowledge, theory and clinical judgement
      • Consider the patient/client perspective and treatment environment
      • Provide clear instructions, apply principles of learning, and use a variety of teaching strategies when educating patients, caregivers, and other members of the health care team as directed by the supervising physical therapist
      • Explain the rationale for selected interventions to achieve patient goals as identified in the plan of care
      • Review health records prior to carrying out the plan of care.
      • Monitor and adjust interventions within the plan of care in response to patient/client status and clinical indications
      • Report any changes in patient status or progress to the supervising physical therapist
      • Identify indications, contraindications, precautions and safety considerations for the patient and determine if the treatment intervention is appropriate
      • Determine when a directed intervention is either beyond the scope of work or personal scope of work of a physical therapist assistant
      • Identify relevant information to communicate to the physical therapist for the discharge planning process
      • Recognize activities, positioning and posture that aggravate or relieve pain
      • Complete documentation which is accurate, legible and follows appropriate guidelines and format regulations
      • Prepare and maintain a safe working environment
      • Handle patients using safe techniques and appropriate body mechanics
      • Select relevant information for documentation and billing purposes  
      • As appropriate to the PTA, maintain and use physical therapy equipment safely and effectively
      • Provide patient centered care


    Total Hours: 110 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80

  
  •  

    PTA 155 Physical Rehabilitation I

    6 credits
    Intervention, data collection and communication skills for providing safe and effective physical therapy for patients in acute care settings as well as with geriatric patients. Skills include transfers and bed mobility, assistive mobility devices, and communicating with the healthcare team.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 242 , PTA 105 , PTA 115 , PTA 117 , and PTA 125  

    Corequisites: PTA 126 , PTA 135 , and PTA 145  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe and implement adaptations to communication techniques, interventions and data collection techniques within the plan of care that are important for providing safe, compassionate and effective care for geriatric patients, patients in acute care settings, patients with cardiac or pulmonary conditions and/or patients with specific post-operative precautions
    • Describe the roles of those involved in patient care and discharge planning for a patient in acute, sub-acute, and long-term care facilities
    • Discuss the importance of patient-centered inter-professional collaborative care
    • Value the role of caregivers in treatment and patient home care
    • Effectively provide patient-related instruction to family members and caregivers
    • Instruct patients in weight-bearing status parameters
    • Define the levels of assistance provided to patients during functional mobility
    • Identify and provide the appropriate level of assistance to a patient during functional mobility
    • Compare and contrast a variety of special patient care units in an inpatient care facility
    • Identify special support and monitoring equipment, diagnostic tests, labs, and/or procedures which may be encountered in acute, sub-acute, and long-term care facilities
    • Describe age-related changes in anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology
    • Discuss psychosocial aspects of aging
    • Describe ageism and its potential effects in rehabilitation
    • Recognize and report when signs of elder abuse or neglect are present
    • Identify assessment tools commonly used by physical therapists with geriatric patient populations
    • Administer standardized questionnaires and tests relevant to geriatric patients as appropriate to the role of a PTA
    • Discuss the importance of improving balance and reducing fall risk in geriatric patients with increased fall risk
    • Discuss reimbursement and supervision issues involved with providing physical therapy services to geriatric patients
    • Implement selected components of interventions identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Functional training
      • Bed mobility
      • Basic transfers
      • Assistive device equipment and use for gait and basic transfers
      • Basic wheelchair equipment and use
      • Airway clearance techniques: breathing exercises, coughing techniques, and secretion mobilization
      • Conditioning or reconditioning
      • Strength, power, and endurance training for ventilatory muscles
      • Relaxation techniques and breathing strategies
      • Integumentary protection techniques
      • Injury prevention or reduction education
      • Application, adjustment, use and care of relevant adaptive, assistive, orthotic, and supportive devices and equipment
      • Motor function training: gait and locomotion training
      • Functional training in self-care, home and community life
    • Perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the physical therapist including data collection for:
      • Interview patients/clients, caregivers and family to obtain current information related to prior and current level of function and general health status
      • Aerobic capacity and endurance
      • Assistive devices
      • Gait, locomotion, and balance
      • Ventilation, respiration and circulation examination
      • Arousal, attention and cognition
      • Pain and integumentary integrity
      • Assistive, adaptive, orthotic, protective, and supportive devices
      • Environmental barriers for self-care, home and community life
    • When providing interventions and associated data collection techniques:
      • Display professional behaviors consistent with the expectations of the physical therapy profession
      • Protect patient modesty, privacy, and dignity
      • Apply current physical therapy knowledge, theory and clinical judgement
      • Consider the patient/client perspective and treatment environment.
      • Provide clear instructions, apply principles of learning, and use a variety of teaching strategies when educating patients, caregivers, and other members of the health care team as directed by the supervising physical therapist
      • Explain the rationale for selected interventions to achieve patient goals as identified in the plan of care
      • Review health records prior to carrying out the plan of care.
      • Monitor and adjust interventions within the plan of care in response to patient/client status and clinical indications
      • Report any changes in patient status or progress to the supervising physical therapist
      • Identify indications, contraindications, precautions and safety considerations for the patient and determine if the treatment intervention is appropriate
      • Determine when a directed intervention is either beyond the scope of work or personal scope of work of a physical therapist assistant
      • Identify relevant information to communicate to the physical therapist for the discharge planning process
      • Recognize activities, positioning and posture that aggravate or relieve pain
      • Select relevant information for documentation
      • Prepare and maintain a safe working environment
      • Handle patients using safe techniques and appropriate body mechanics
      • Select relevant information for documentation and billing purposes
      • As appropriate to the PTA, maintain and use physical therapy equipment safely and effectively
      • Provide patient centered care


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    PTA 156 Physical Rehabilitation II

    7 credits
    Therapeutic interventions and data collection skills for patients with neurologic conditions. Review of structure and function of the nervous system and common neurologic and neuromuscular disorders.

    Prerequisites: PTA 126 , PTA 135 , PTA 145 , and PTA 155  

    Corequisites: PTA 136  and PTA 146  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify significant structures and functions of the structures in the nervous system
    • Identify causes and mechanisms of common neurologic and neuromuscular disorders.
    • List complications associated with common neurologic and neuromuscular disorders.
    • Describe the roles and responsibilities of health care providers involved in the care of patients with common neurologic and neuromuscular disorders.
    • Relate motor control and motor learning theories to therapeutic interventions for patients with common neurologic and neuromuscular disorders.
    • Explain the use of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation patterns and techniques
    • Describe sensory systems associated with balance control and coordination
    • Identify motor strategies used for balance control
    • Identify and integrate appropriate evidence-based resources to support clinical decision-making for progression of the patient within the plan of care established by the PT
    • Implement selected components of interventions for patients with common neurologic and neuromuscular disorders identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Functional training
      • Gait and locomotion training
      • Balance and coordination training
      • Posture awareness training
      • Neuromotor development training
      • Strength training
      • Passive range of motion
      • Integumentary protection techniques
      • Wheelchair propulsion programs for conditioning
      • Application & adjustment of devices and equipment
    • Perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Arousal, attention, and cognition
      • Environmental barriers, self-care and home management
      • Gait, locomotion, and balance
      • Posture and body mechanics
      • Muscle function including changes in muscle tone and strength
      • Joint integrity and mobility
      • Pain and integumentary integrity
      • Sensory response
      • Vital signs
      • Assistive, adaptive, orthotic, protective and supportive devices
    • When providing interventions and associated data collection techniques:
      • Display professional behaviors consistent with the expectations of the physical therapy profession
      • Protect patient modesty, privacy, and dignity
      • Apply current physical therapy knowledge, theory and clinical judgement
      • Consider the patient/client perspective and treatment environment.
      • Provide clear instructions, apply principles of learning, and use a variety of teaching strategies when educating patients, caregivers, and other members of the health care team as directed by the supervising physical therapist
      • Explain the rationale for selected interventions to achieve patient goals as identified in the plan of care
      • Review health records prior to carrying out the plan of care.
      • Monitor and adjust interventions within the plan of care in response to patient/client status and clinical indications
      • Report any changes in patient status or progress to the supervising physical therapist
      • Identify indications, contraindications, precautions and safety considerations for the patient and determine if the treatment intervention is appropriate
      • Determine when a directed intervention is either beyond the scope of work or personal scope of work of a physical therapist assistant
      • Identify relevant information to communicate to the physical therapist for the discharge planning process
      • Recognize activities, positioning and posture that aggravate or relieve pain
      • Complete documentation which is accurate, legible and follows appropriate guidelines and format regulations
      • Prepare and maintain a safe working environment
      • Handle patients using safe techniques and appropriate body mechanics
      • Select relevant information for documentation and billing purposes
      • As appropriate to the PTA, maintain and use physical therapy equipment safely and effectively
      • Provide patient centered care


    Total Hours: 110 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
  •  

    PTA 190 Clinical Affiliation I

    4 credits
    Initial full-time clinical affiliation in a physical therapy clinical setting under supervision of a clinical instructor. Application of behavioral, data collection, and therapeutic intervention skills acquired in previous PTA technical coursework.

    Prerequisites: PTA 136 , PTA 146 , and PTA 156  

    Corequisites: PTA 215  and PTA 255  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Within the physical therapist’s plan of care, safely and consistently perform selected physical therapy interventions and associated data collection techniques with limited skill proficiency for simple patient conditions, tasks, and care environments using a moderate expenditure of time and effort and with maximal input and direction from the clinical instructor
    • Given extra time and frequent guidance, perform adequate documentation and communication with the physical therapist regarding all aspects of patient treatment and patient response to physical therapy interventions
    • Use resources and equipment within a physical therapy setting in an efficient and effective manner 100% of the time, with direct supervision from the clinical instructor 75%-90% of the time
    • Demonstrate consistency in developing proficiency of clinical problem solving with simple patient conditions and situations
    • Use self-assessment skills and develop plans to improve knowledge, skills, and behaviors 100% of the time, with guidance of the clinical instructor 75%-90% of the time
    • Adapt delivery of physical therapy services with consideration for patients’ differences, values, preferences, and needs with moderate guidance from the clinical instructor
    • Perform in a manner consistent with established legal standards, standards of the profession, and ethical guidelines 100% of the time, with guidance from the clinical instructor 75%-90% of the time
    • Demonstrate expected clinical behaviors in a professional manner with simple patient conditions and situations
    • Consistently perform in a safe manner that minimizes the risk to patient, self, and others in situations that involve patients with simple conditions and care environments and seek consultation or assistance as appropriate
    • Communicate effectively with patient/clients, family members, caregivers, practioners and/or inter-professional team members


    Total Hours: 120 Practicum or Internship Hours: 120
  
  •  

    PTA 215 Procedures II

    5 credits
    Principles and application of physical agents and modalities with focus on mechanical and light agents. Therapeutic interventions and data collection skills for integumentary conditions and edema management within the role of the PTA.

    Prerequisites: PTA 136 , PTA 146 , and PTA 156  

    Corequisites: PTA 190  and PTA 255  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify activities, positioning, and postures that produce or relieve trauma to the integumentary system
    • Identify signs of infection as they relate to therapeutic interventions for the integumentary or lymphatic systems
    • List therapeutic interventions relevant to patients with lymphatic system disorders
    • Implement selected components of interventions for patients with lymphatic system disorders as identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist
    • List therapeutic interventions relevant to patients with integumentary system disorders
    • Implement selected components of interventions for patients with integumentary disorders as identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Infection control procedures
      • Application and adjustment of supportive devices
      • Integumentary repair and protection techniques
      • Hydrotherapy
    • Perform components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care for patients including:
      • Anthropometric characteristics - limb girth
      • Activities that aggravate or relieve edema
      • Integumentary integrity
      • Joint integrity and mobility
      • Pain location and intensity
    • Describe the use of light and athermal agents as physical therapy interventions
    • Implement selected components of physical therapy mechanical modalities including mechanical traction and compression
    • Identify indications, contraindications, precautions and safety considerations for the patient for wound care, lymphedema, mechanical and light agents
    • Identify when a directed intervention is either beyond the scope of work or personal scope of work of a physical therapist assistant
    • Integrate and apply knowledge and skills from PTA coursework including kinesiology, modalities, therapeutic exercise and other orthopedic interventions to orthopedic case scenarios


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    PTA 235 Topics in Physical Therapy III

    2 credits
    This course covers topics and skills of PTA career development, performance improvement & quality assurance, and ethical behavior in the physical therapy workplace.

    Prerequisites: PTA 190 , PTA 215 , and PTA 255  

    Corequisites: PTA 256 , PTA 280 , and PTA 290  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify resources both within and outside the clinic that help to increase one’s knowledge and skills as a physical therapist assistant
    • Identify opportunities for lifelong learning as a PTA
    • Assess the relevance and value of opportunities for lifelong learning as a PTA
    • Design a self-directed plan for career development and lifelong learning
    • Identify available resources for PTA board examination preparation
    • Design a self-directed plan for board examination preparation
    • Identify performance improvement and quality assurance activities in the workplace
    • Contribute to a physical therapy workplace team through participation in performance improvement and/or quality assurance activities
    • Analyze and discuss ethical situations encountered in physical therapy
    • Apply an ethical decision-making framework to different types of ethical scenarios in the physical therapy workplace
    • Utilize the APTA Standards of Ethical Conduct for the PTA and the Guide for Conduct of the PTA in analysis and discussion of ethical situations in physical therapy


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    PTA 236 Topics in Physical Therapy IV

    3 credits
    This course covers skills to obtain a job and enter the workforce as a PTA including licensure preparation, board exam review, job search, and interview skills.

    Prerequisites: PTA 235 , PTA 256 , PTA 280 , and PTA 290  

    Corequisites: PTA 281  and PTA 291  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Revise own resume sufficient to obtain a position in the workforce as an entry-level physical therapist assistant 
    • Develop a cover letter sufficient to relate personal strengths relevant to an entry-level workforce position as a physical therapist assistant
    • Employ effective PTA job search and application skills including the following:
      • Evaluate the qualities of a potential work environment
      • Identify where to find current jobs available on the market
      • Complete forms often required in a job application process
    • Employ effective job interview skills for PTA positions
    • Implement a board exam preparation plan
    • Complete a mock board exam
    • Complete initial PTA licensure application paperwork


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    PTA 255 Physical Rehabilitation III

    4 credits
    Motor development, common diagnoses and treatment considerations for pediatric patients. Covers therapeutic interventions and data collection skills within the role of the PTA important for providing safe and effective physical therapy for children.

    Prerequisites: PTA 136 , PTA 146 , and PTA 156  

    Corequisites: PTA 190  and PTA 215  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define gross- and fine- motor milestones
    • List righting and equilibrium reactions
    • Identify characteristics of motor development throughout the lifespan
    • Describe the pathology and clinical characteristics of common pediatric disorders
    • Recognize signs of abuse of vulnerable populations
    • Report to appropriate authorities suspected cases of abuse of vulnerable populations
    • Identify assessment tools commonly used by physical therapists with pediatric patient populations
    • Communicate effectively with pediatric patients
    • Identify the differences between common pediatric intervention philosophies
    • Use the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and heath to describe a patient’s/client’s impairments , activity and participation limitations
    • Adapt selected components of interventions for pediatric patients as identified in the plan of care established by the physical therapist including:
      • Functional training
      • Motor function training
      • Positioning and handling
      • Strengthening and stability training
      • Neuromotor development training
      • Patient education
    • Adapt components of data collection skills essential for carrying out the plan of care established by the physical therapist for pediatric patients including:
      • Environmental barriers, self-care and home management
      • Gait, locomotion, and balance
      • Pain location and intensity
      • Mental functions: arousal, mentation, and cognition
      • Muscle performance
      • Neuromotor development and function
      • Assistive, adaptive, orthotic, protective, and supportive devices
    • Participate in a service- learning experience with special populations to increase understanding of the needs/challenges of the community being served
    • Demonstrate self-reflection of how the service learning experience influenced his/her view of community service in PTA education


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    PTA 256 Physical Rehabilitation IV

    4 credits


    PTA skills for working with patients with complex conditions including patients with spinal cord injuries and patients post amputation. Course also covers psychosocial aspects of patient care encountered when working as a PTA.

    Psychosocial aspects of care includes topics of chronic pain, grief, depression, and other mental health conditions commonly encountered in physical therapy.

    Prerequisites: PTA 190 , PTA 215 , and PTA 255  

    Corequisites: PTA 235 , PTA 280 , and PTA 290  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss the role of the PTA in working with patient with complex conditions
    • Identify the common causes of spinal cord injury
    • Describe the clinical presentation following damage to the spinal cord
    • Discuss the impact of complications associated with spinal cord injury
    • Take appropriate action as a PTA to respond to emergency situations related to spinal cord injury such as autonomic dysreflexia
    • Identify the typical functional outcomes for patients with spinal cord injury at various lesion levels
    • Relate new technology and treatments related to spinal cord injury
    • Safely, effectively, and efficiently implement selected physical therapy interventions and data collection techniques within the PT’s plan of care for a patient post spinal cord injury
    • Identify the common causes of lower extremity amputation
    • List and describe the types of postsurgical dressings used post amputation
    • List the phases of care and related prosthetics post amputation
    • Safely, effectively, and efficiently implement selected physical therapy interventions and data collection techniques within the PT’s plan of care for a patient post amputation
    • Discuss the psychosocial factors that influence rehabilitation
    • Identify the various professionals who may be involved in evaluation and interventions for patients with psychosocial issues
    • Recognize the warning signs of possible post-traumatic stress disorder and other psychosocial crisis points or dangerous behaviors
    • Describe possible actions to take as a PTA when encountering a patient who is demonstrating behaviors dangerous to the patient or to others
    • Broadly describe the grief process and the implications of the interaction of the grief process with physical therapy treatment
    • List defense mechanisms which are common reactions to disability
    • Identify methods to help patients manage anxiety and/or depression during physical therapy sessions which are within the scope of work of the physical therapist and physical therapist assistant
    • Implement relaxation interventions within the PT plan of care
    • Compare and contrast the presentation of acute, persistent, and chronic pain
    • List causes and risk factors for chronic pain
    • Identify the psychosocial factors associated with chronic pain
    • Summarize medical management options for chronic pain
    • Discuss complementary and alternative medicine approaches to managing chronic pain
    • Describe physical therapy intervention approaches appropriate for individuals with chronic pain


  
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    PTA 280 Seminar I

    1 credits


    This course covers foundational case presentation skills in preparation for capstone physical therapy case presentation in Seminar II.

    Prerequisites: PTA 190 , PTA 215 , and PTA 255  

    Corequisites: PTA 235 , PTA 256 , and PTA 290  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify available case presentation tools and styles
    • Identify the qualities of and skills for an effective case presentation to a group
    • Identify and discuss the evidence-based resources that support the clinical decision making for the progression of the patient within the plan of care established by the PT
    • Use the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health to identify the patient’s/client’s impairments, activity, and participation limitations for a physical therapy case presentation
    • Determine appropriate presentation tools and styles for a physical therapy case presentation
    • Design a physical therapy case presentation using effective presentation tools and skills


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10

  
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    PTA 281 Seminar II

    1 credit
    This course includes the review, presentation, and discussion of a case based on a clinical affiliation experience from PTA 290  or PTA 291 .

    Prerequisites: PTA 235 , PTA 256 , PTA 280 , and PTA 290  

    Corequisites: PTA 236  and PTA 291  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Incorporate all required elements in a case presentation
    • Integrate concepts from prerequisite course work, foundational courses and PTA technical and clinical courses in a physical therapy case presentation
    • Identify and discuss the evidence-based resources that support the clinical decision making for the progression of the patient within the plan of care established by the PT
    • Present a physical therapy case presentation  applying the  International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health to discuss the patient’s/client’s impairments, activity, and participation limitations
    • Create effective learning objectives which summarize the main points of a case presentation
    • Appropriately de-identify patient information for case presentation following confidentiality guidelines
    • Use appropriate terminology, abbreviations, grammar, and syntax in case presentation
    • Present a physical therapy case presentation and its related learning objectives


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10
  
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    PTA 290 Clinical Affiliation II

    8 credits
    Full-time clinical affiliation to develop and refine practical application of PTA skills under the supervision of an on-site clinical instructor.

    Prerequisites: PTA 190 , PTA 215 , and PTA 255  

    Corequisites: PTA 235 , PTA 256 , and PTA 280  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Within the physical therapist’s plan of care, safely and consistently perform selected physical therapy interventions and associated data collection techniques with limited skill proficiency for simple patient conditions, tasks, and care environments under the direction and supervision of the clinical instructor less than 25% of the time and using a minimal expenditure of time and effort
    • Within the physical therapist’s plan of care, safely and consistently perform selected physical therapy interventions and associated data collection techniques for complex patient conditions, tasks, and care environments under the direction and supervision of the clinical instructor 25-50% of the time, demonstrating developing proficiency, and using a minimal expenditure of time and effort
    • In a timely manner with occasional guidance, perform accurate and relevant documentation and communication with the physical therapist regarding all aspects of patient treatment and patient response to physical therapy interventions
    • Communicate effectively with patient/clients, family members, caregivers, practioners and/or inter-professional team members.
    • Use resources and equipment within a physical therapy setting in an efficient and effective manner 100% of the time, with direct supervision from the clinical instructor 50%-75% of the time
    • Demonstrate consistency and proficiency of clinical problem solving with simple tasks and require only occasional cueing for more complex patient conditions and situations
    • Use self-assessment skills and develop plans to improve knowledge, skills, and behaviors 100% of the time, with guidance of the clinical instructor less than 25% of the time
    • Adapt delivery of physical therapy services with consideration for patients’ differences, values, preferences, and needs with minimal guidance from the clinical instructor
    • When working with new or complex situations, perform in a manner consistent with established legal standards, standards of the profession, and ethical guidelines 100% of the time, with guidance from the clinical instructor less than 25% of the time
    • Demonstrate expected clinical behaviors in a professional manner with simple and complex patient conditions and situations 
    • Consistently perform in a safe manner that minimizes the risk to patient, self, and others in situations that involve patients with simple or complex conditions and care environments and seek consultation or assistance as appropriate


    Total Hours: 240 Practicum or Internship Hours: 240
  
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    PTA 291 Clinical Affiliation III

    9 credits
    Final full-time clinical affiliation to continue to develop and refine practical application of PTA skills under the supervision of a clinical instructor in preparation to enter the field as an entry-level PTA.

    Prerequisites: PTA 235 , PTA 256 , PTA 280 , and PTA 290  

    Corequisites: PTA 236  and PTA 281  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Within the physical therapist’s plan of care, safely, consistently, efficiently, and independently demonstrate skilled performance of selected physical therapy interventions and associated data collection techniques for simple and complex patient conditions and environments, with appropriate consultation with the supervising therapist for new or unusual situations
    • Independently and in a timely manner, perform accurate and relevant documentation and communication with the physical therapist regarding all aspects of patient treatment and patient response to physical therapy interventions
    • Independently use resources and equipment in a physical therapy setting in an efficient and effective manner
    • Demonstrate consistency, proficiency, and skill in clinical problem solving with simple and complex patient conditions and environments
    • Use self-assessment skills and develop plans to improve knowledge, skills, and behaviors
    • Adapt delivery of physical therapy services with consideration for patients’ differences, values, preferences, and needs 
    • Perform in a manner consistent with established legal standards, standards of the profession, and ethical guidelines at all times
    • Demonstrate expected clinical behaviors in a professional manner with simple and complex patient conditions and environments 
    • Consistently perform in a safe manner that minimizes the risk to patient, self, and others in situations that involve patients with simple or complex conditions and care environments and seek consultation or assistance as appropriate


    Total Hours: 270 Practicum or Internship Hours: 270

Physics

  
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    PHYS& 114 General Physics I w/Lab

    5 credits


    This course covers kinematics, motion in two-dimensions, force and motion, work and energy, momentum and collisions, circular motion, gravitation, rotational motion, and solids. Includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: MATH 098 , or MATH 099 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define the basic concepts of introductory mechanical physics
    • Describe physical and quantitative relationships between kinetic and potential energy; impulse and momentum; force, mass, and acceleration; inertia and mass; work, power, and energy
    • Express, with the use of graphing techniques and analytical means, the relationships among displacement velocity and acceleration
    • Solve projectile and force problems using vector analysis
    • Define Newton’s Laws of Motion and analytically illustrate how they determine motion in “real-life” examples
    • Apply information learned to team laboratory and demonstration exercises


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    PHYS& 115 General Physics II w/Lab

    5 credits
    This course covers ideal gas law & kinetic theory, thermodynamics, temperature and heat, heat transfer, electric forces and fields, electric potential, electric circuits, magnetic forces & fields, electromagnetic induction. Includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: PHYS& 114 .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Solve physical problems in class and labs
    • Apply physical concepts to practical applications
    • Solve problems involving thermodynamics
    • Solve problems involving electricity and magnetisms


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    PHYS& 221 Engineering Physics I with Lab

    5 credits
    This course covers the basic principles of Newtonian mechanics including: vector mathematics, multidimensional kinematics, Newton’s laws of dynamics, various forces of nature, circular motion, the universal gravitational law, mechanical energy conservation methods, linear momentum, and rigid body kinematics and dynamics. Laboratory work is included.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 142  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Expand and improve quantitative/symbolic manipulation capabilities
    • Apply the paradigms of classical mechanics to problem solving in the engineering context
    • Measure, record, and analyze signals using A/D converters with various sensors interfaced to computers using appropriate software
    • Explain both the power and limitations of the classical Newtonian approach in the conceptualization and design of engineered creations


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    PHYS& 222 Engineering Physics II with Lab

    5 credits
    This course covers the basic principles of electromagnetism including: Coulomb’s law, the electric and potential fields, Gauss’s law, capacitance, current, resistance, DC circuit theory, magnetism, the magnetic field, Biot-Savart & Ampere’s law, and Faraday’s law. Laboratory work is included.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 151  and PHYS& 221  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Expand and improve quantitative/symbolic manipulation capabilities
    • Apply the paradigms of classical E&M to problem solving in the engineering context
    • Measure, record, and analyze signals using A/D converters with various sensors interfaced to computers using appropriate software
    • Explain both the power and limitations of a Maxwell’s equations approach in the conceptualization and design of engineered creations


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    PHYS& 223 Engineering Physics III with Lab

    5 credits
    This course covers the basic principles of oscillatory motion and Hook’s law, the wave equation, mechanical waves (acoustics), Maxwell’s equations, geometric optics, physical optics, diffraction, interference, and polarization. Laboratory work is included.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 152  and PHYS& 222  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Expand and improve quantitative/symbolic manipulation capabilities
    • Apply oscillatory/wave phenomena to problem solving in the engineering context
    • Measure, record, and analyze signals using A/D converters with various sensors interfaced to computers using appropriate software
    • Explain both the power and limitations of a Maxwell’s equations approach in the conceptualization and design of engineered creations, especially in regards to EM/optical communications


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

Political Science

  
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    POLS& 202 American Government

    5 credits
    This course explores various interpretations of American democracy and evaluates the changing nature of the American political system, origins, institutions, and operations. Students investigate issues of individual rights, popular representation, and power and policies; analyze formal and informal institutions of government; articulate conventional and unconventional means of citizen participation; and interpret political outcomes.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 099  (or placement into ENGL& 101 )

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Evaluate information about American political ideologies and evidence used to support them
    • Analyze real world evidence and hypothetical political and economic issues
    • Explain key concepts in American government and politics
    • Evaluate the political analyses of political commentators and political actors and other sources of political information to distinguish between fact and opinion
    • Evaluate and articulate the impact of historical and current events on the development and functioning of American Government
    • Evaluate and draw conclusions from competing and contradictory sources
    • Present theoretical solutions to contemporary political and economic problems
    • Articulate how well ideologies describe real world problems and offer solutions to those problems.
    • Communicate awareness and understanding of key concepts in American government through written and/or oral expression
    • Present theoretical solutions to contemporary political and economic problems


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Psychology

  
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    PSYC 099 Human Relations

    5 credits
    Course will cover essential communication and interpersonal skills desired in the work environment. Teamwork skills will be achieved through practical application.

    Prerequisites: ABED 045 , or ABED 046 , or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the basic steps in the communication process
    • Understand non-verbal communication and practice identifying non-verbal clues
    • Describe barriers to communication and explain how to overcome them
    • Develop improved listening skills
    • Identify the types of teams that characterize most organizations
    • Identify various team member roles
    • Select key leadership traits for personal/professional development
    • Describe how an individual can develop his/her leadership potential
    • Recognize his/her typical method of resolving conflict
    • Develop effective techniques for negotiating and resolving conflict
    • Recognize which groups and individuals fit under the diversity umbrella
    • Identify steps by which many cross-cultural barriers can be overcome
    • Describe how to combat racial and sexual harassment in the workplace
    • Recognize the importance of ethical behavior for establishing good interpersonal relations in the workplace
    • Identify job situations that present ethical dilemmas
    • Develop and use a systematic method for making ethical decisions
    • Discuss the importance of grooming and hygiene as it relates to his/her career
    • Discuss ways to balance work and family needs
    • Differentiate between short- and long-term goals
    • Describe goal-setting processes
    • Understand the impact of self-esteem on career and personal goals
    • Identify sources that contribute to self-esteem


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    PSYC 324 Psychology of Organizations

    5 credits
    This course prepares the student to exercise effective leadership by learning positive psychology, negotiation and labor relations, strength-based management of individuals and teams, motivation/morale, and conflict resolution.

    Prerequisites: Admission to a baccalaureate program and PSYC& 100  or SOC& 101 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply practical expertise in selection of new employees, performance management, motivation, and work attitudes
    • Create a work environment that fosters employee well being and productivity by constructing cohesive work groups
    • Support cultural differences to improve the utilization of human capital and effectiveness of the organization
    • Evaluate sources of conflict to generate win-win negotiation
    • Analyze leadership and management styles and their impact on groups and individuals
    • Coach employees in career planning and development using practical application of the theories of adult learning and human behavior in the workplace


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    PSYC 330 Wellness, Resilience, and Self-Awareness

    5 credits
    Prerequisites: ENGL& 101  and admission to any applied baccalaureate program

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    PSYC 441 Psychology of Creativity

    5 credits
    This course is a close examination of creativity as a human trait. Issues of definition, identification, measurement, development, use, loss, and value in the design process are examined.

    Prerequisites: PSYC& 100  or equivalent. Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission.

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Evaluate measurements and outcomes of creativity
    • Identify obstacles to creativity in the design process and methods for overcoming them
    • Apply concepts and theories of creativity to the field of design
    • Describe characteristics of creative individuals
    • Identify characteristics of workplace environments that are conducive to facilitating creative processes
    • Appreciate cross-cultural perspectives of creativity


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    PSYC& 100 General Psychology

    5 credits
    This course will introduce students to the principles of motivation, communication, human development and learning. Practical applications will be made to individual difference, group process and behavior in organizations.

    Prerequisites: ABED 045 , or ABED 046 , or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Correctly use basic psychological terminology, concepts, and theories
    • Describe how biological, psychological, social factors affect behavior
    • Critically analyze information about human behavior
    • Distinguish between scientific and non-scientific ways of knowing
    • Appreciate how psychology explains personal experience and social interaction
    • Explain how culture, gender, and group identity can influence self-awareness and relationships between and among groups
    • Develop, organize, implement, and present a term project


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology

    5 credits
    Students will learn the stages of human development from infancy throughout the life span. Stages will be discussed in terms of physical, social and psychological. Normal growth and development are discussed for each developmental stage. Also addressed are deviations from normal as behaviors which interfere with function. Practical applications are made.

    Prerequisites: ABED 045 , or ABED 046 , or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss the general concepts of human development and behavior
    • Understand basic psychological terminology, concepts, and theories
    • Describe how biological, psychological, and social factors affect behavior
    • Explain the developmental theories of Erickson, Piaget, Kohlberg, and others
    • Describe the physical, mental, emotional, and social developmental characteristics at each developmental stage throughout the life span
    • Describe possible blocks to normal growth and development at all stages
    • Define the critical periods in development
    • Explain the impact on the individual and the family when individuals have not developed along expected patterns
    • Describe the stages of death and dying as defined by Kubler-Ross


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    PSYC& 220 Abnormal Psychology

    5 credits
    Students will learn to identify symptoms of abnormal psychological disorders and diagnostic classifications, including various models of treatment. Students will gain a better understanding of maladaptive behavior and its impact on individuals, families, and society. They will also acquire basic information regarding the identification and management of high-risk situations that may occur during the course of their work as a human service professional.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define the four components of abnormal behavior
    • Compare and contrast the theoretical models of abnormal behavior
    • Differentiate between varieties of psychological disorders as defined in the DSM
    • Examine the role of the human service professional in working with clients with diagnosed psychological disorders
    • Describe the effects of maladaptive behavior on individuals, families, and society
    • Illustrate methods for de-escalating the angry/emotional client
    • Implement crisis management techniques
    • Analyze personal and professional limits and employ self-care to avoid burnout
    • Evaluate the impact of cultural norms on the determination of abnormal behavior


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Public Health

  
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    CHPH 315 Vulnerable Populations

    5 credits
    This course investigates the various perspectives describing and understanding mental health, mental health disorders and addictions, and interventions, including assessment, treatment, and self-help strategies within individual, group, family, and community contexts.

    Prerequisites: PUBH 310 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    CHPH 325 Health Equity and Social Justice

    5 credits
    This course analyzes issues related to health disparity, and issues related to social justice, such as healthcare access, unequal treatment based on ethnicity, race, income, and strategies for supporting diverse populations to reduce disparity and influence public policy.

    Prerequisites: PHIL 301 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    CHPH 435 Community Health Issues

    5 credits
    This course addresses issues in community health. It introduces strategies to reduce health risks, health disparity, and introduces resources for community intervention and prevention programs.

    Prerequisites: PUBH 401  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    CHPH 455 Service Learning Capstone

    5 credits
    This course is designed to serve as a service learning experience. Students will collaborate with local agencies to develop a community health program. Students will also participate in a weekly meeting with students in other capstone courses from the other specializations to collaborate and share information and knowledge gained.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 110 Lecture Hours: 20 Practicum or Internship Hours: 90
  
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    EPID 315 Statistical Research: Data Management & Analysis

    5 credits
    This course introduces statistical analysis software packages typically encountered in epidemiological research. Students will develop data analysis techniques for dataset analysis for the various software packages.

    Prerequisites: MATH 351  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Conduct basic statistical analysis using software
    • Import data of different types and create a clean dataset​
    • Evaluate correlations between variables of interest​
    • Create data analysis including data visualization specific to epidemiology
    • ​Design an effective presentation of findings


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    EPID 325 Advanced Principles of Epidemiology

    5 credits
    This course is designed to train students to apply epidemiological principles to determine disease etiology as well as evaluate prevention and intervention programs. It will do so in the context of the five areas of epidemiology: environmental health, biostatistics, epidemiology, social and behavior sciences, and health management and policy.

    Prerequisites: PUBH 320  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion fo ths course students will be able to:

    • Evaluate prevention and intervention programs
    • Characterize source, target, and sampling populations and identify the methods for recruitment 
    • Review the measures of frequency and association in order to appropriately interpret and apply data analysis
    • Integrate and apply research findings in the areas of environmental health, biostatistics, epidemiology, social and behavior sciences, health management and policy, etc. with public health practice


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    EPID 435 Field Epidemiology

    5 credits
    This course allows students the opportunity to conduct epidemiological field studies, including the application of survey methodology. Students learn techniques and acquire resources needed to design and carry out the field portion of an epidemiological investigation, including staff recruitment and training; counting and listing techniques; enumeration methodologies; subject recruitment, retention, and tracking; data storage and management; and general survey instrument issues.

    Prerequisites: EPID 325  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    • Formulate the foundational skillset necessary for a field epidemiologist
    • Evaluate and construct the steps required in an outbreak investigation
    • Differentiate between the steps required in an outbreak investigation versus chronic disease, health equity, or health policy field work
    • Critique literature in field epidemiology


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    EPID 455 Service Learning Capstone

    5 credits
    This course is designed to serve as an epidemiology capstone experience. Students will work with local agencies and health departments engaged in health surveillance and monitoring on projects that may include data analysis and application, using GIS mapping tools and related software, field observations, and community assessment. Students will also participate in a weekly meeting with students in other capstone courses from the other specializations to collaborate and share information and knowledge gained.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 110 Lecture Hours: 20 Practicum or Internship Hours: 90
  
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    PUBH 301 Foundations of Public Health

    5 credits
    This course will introduce the foundations of various specializations in public health including chronic and infectious epidemiology, behavioral and social epidemiology, community health, molecular and genetic epidemiology, etc. Students will develop a broad understanding of how these specializations address public health issues across the globe by this introduction to the fundamental principles, concepts, and tools used in various public health disciplines.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss the history, mission, and goals of public health
    • Investigate core specializations in public health including epidemiology, community health, and biostatistics
    • Explore key concepts of public health, including morbidity and mortality, infectious and chronic disease, social determinants of health, and health disparities within populations
    • Discuss the major issues and strategies for health promotion and disease prevention
    • Explain the role of public health professionals in addressing the public’s health
    • Investigate the role of governments and health policy in public health
    • Compare and contrast public health efforts locally, nationally, and globally


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PUBH 310 Theories of Health Behavior

    5 credits
    This course will introduce various health behavior theories (personal, social, and population-based) and their roles in health education, research, and intervention.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PUBH 320 Principles of Epidemiology

    5 credits
    An introduction to epidemiological investigations of disease (infectious and noninfectious). Includes introduction to study design for investigating disease etiology, mode of transmission, and pathogenesis.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PUBH 330 Healthcare Leadership and Management

    5 credits
    This course presents core concepts of healthcare structure and leadership, including organizational design as it relates to workplace diversity, managing versus leading professionals, and overall system function.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH or BASBH program

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    PUBH 340 Global Health

    5 credits
    This course surveys current global health issues such as disease burden and distribution, health inequality and disparity, global health policy, and global health interventions.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
 

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