Catalog 2018-2019 
    
    Dec 05, 2020  
Catalog 2018-2019 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Early Childhood Education

  
  •  

    EDUC 140 Diversity in Education

    3 credits
    Students will explore social justice issues and build cultural competency in an educational setting.  Students will examine in depth the historical and current impact of children’s, teachers’, and families’ cultural context in our schools.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  and ABED 046  or placement scores.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and define appropriate terminology in multicultural education
    • Describe and critically evaluate and communicate the social, political and cultural origins and manifestations of racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism/homophobia, ableism, and ageism in the current education system
    • Identify and critically analyze the cultural contexts that have shaped the student’s experiences as well as those of the children and families served in the educational setting
    • Explain the impact of bias on the healthy growth and development of all children
    • Define and describe the following approaches: anti-bias, multicultural, culturally relevant, and bilingual/bicultural
    • Design, assess, and adjust a culturally relevant anti-bias curriculum


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    EDUC& 115 Child Development

    5 credits
    In this course students build a functional understanding of the foundations of child development, prenatal to age eleven. Students observe and document physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of children, reflective of cross cultural and global perspectives.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss prominent child development research and theories
    • Describe the developmental sequence from conception through early adolescence in all domains using appropriate terminology and identifying characteristics of each
    • Describe individual and cultural effects, differences and commonalities in child development and nurturing practices
    • Articulate how family, caregivers, teachers, community, and culture influence development
    • Implement appropriate techniques to conduct and document observations of children as a means to assess and communicate growth and development


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    EDUC& 130 Guiding Behavior

    3 credits


    In this course students examine the principles and theories promoting social competence in young children and creating safe learning environments. Students also develop skills promoting effective interactions, providing positive individual guidance, and enhancing group experiences.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and differentiate developmentally appropriate child behaviors, individually and in groups
    • List and describe positive guidance techniques for children birth through early adolescence
    • Describe and demonstrate positive, respectful and culturally responsive interactions
    • Create a model daily schedule, routine and environment that provide support for attachment, self-help, relationship building, and exercising executive function
    • Develop strategies to promote social/emotional competencies and a positive sense of self
    • Identify and communicate strategies for professional interactions with families and other staff reflecting confidentiality, respect, and a positive approach to guidance
    • Compare and contrast at least three approaches to guiding young children’s behavior

     

    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
  •  

    EDUC& 136 School Age Care

    3 credits
    In this course students develop skills to provide developmentally appropriate and culturally relevant activities and care, specifically: preparing the environment, implementing curriculum, building relationships, guiding academic/social skill development, and community outreach.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Develop a plan to create reciprocal, culturally sensitive relationships with children and families
    • Analyze the effectiveness of the environment and recommend changes reflecting the following standards: bias free, respectful of cultural and individual diversity; developmentally appropriate; promotes positive self-esteem and social interaction; and supports activity, involvement, initiative, responsibility, creativity and a growing sense of autonomy
    • Discuss the dynamics impacting behavior of children in after school care environments and identify guidance strategies promoting academic and social growth
    • Develop a plan for curriculum and program implementation that reflects responsive respect for the local community context
    • Describe state and local school age regulations and procedures related to group size, health, nutrition and safety
    • Identify resources supporting school age care
    • Identify resources supporting school age care/youth development specialists


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    EDUC& 150 Child, Family and Community

    3 credits


    In this course students integrate the family and community contexts in which a child develops. Students also explore cultures and demographics of families in society, community resources, strategies for involving families in the education of their child, and tools for effective communication.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication

    .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss demographic trends of children and families today
    • Identify influences on children’s development and socialization process
    • Establish tools for communicating and creating relationships with families that are respectful, inclusive and that reflect an understanding of cultural and community influences
    • Articulate the benefits of family-centered programs and the importance of supporting parents as their child’s first and most important teacher
    • Describe strategies for engaging families in their children’s learning and development
    • Discuss the importance of collaborating with other community programs to support the needs of children and families
    • Identify community resources and create strategies for connecting children and families to those resources
    • Develop environments that reflect family and community diversity that prevent bias


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
  •  

    EDUC& 203 Exceptional Child

    3 credits
    This course examines the educational, social, and developmental patterns of children with special needs. Students explore the impact of disabilities on children, on families, and on their futures. Students will access local resources available to teachers and families.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  and ABED 046  or placement scores.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the history and philosophy of special education in the United States
    • Describe the primary conditions for which children need additional support for optimal development and learning
    • Explain the process used to identify children with special needs
    • Explain the purpose and components of the IEP and an IFSP
    • Identify and describe different intervention programs designed for children with special needs and local resources available to children and their families
    • Identify professional and ethical guidelines for early childhood special educators
    • Identify, research and apply effective ways to work with children with disabilities and their families


    Total Hours: 33 Lecture Hours: 33
  
  •  

    EDUC& 205 Introduction to Education

    5 credits
    This course provides an introduction to the field of K-12 education, designed to serve the needs of those considering a career in, and those interested in a better understanding of the educational system. This course includes 33 hours of a required, supervised placement in an elementary, middle or high school.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the historical origins and philosophical beliefs of public education in the United States
    • Explain the nature and purpose of public education
    • Identify the current issues facing the State of Washington as they relate to governance and funding along with the impact these issues have on the classroom
    • Examine current issues in education, including the roles of unions, political influences, school reform, and school choice
    • Articulate the current requirements for teacher certification programs in Washington State
    • Examine the breadth of diversity reflected in public school populations
    • Identify current theories related to how children learn and relate these theories to possible implications for teaching
    • Identify and employ specific techniques for motivating students to learn, for dealing with disruptive behaviors, and for dealing with the challenges presented within the classroom
    • Identify and critically evaluate their own personal philosophy of education, professional goals, and positive communications skills when working with students, peers and supervisors



Economics

  
  •  

    ECON 310 Business Economics

    5 credits
    Covers applied microeconomic analysis and introduces applied macroeconomic analysis of relevance to the business firm. Emphasizes the development of economic tools and concepts that can be used in the firm’s management decision-making process. Builds upon the standard economic analysis of the firm that integrates a company’s revenue, cost, output and pricing decisions. Marginal and incremental reasoning is stressed as an important decision-making principle.

    Prerequisites: TLM 301  and admission to BASTLM program.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interpret and analyze the principles essential for understanding the economizing problem, specific economic issue, and policy alternatives
    • Apply the economic perspective and reason accurately and objectively about economic matters that can be used in the firm’s decision making process.
    • Analyze applied macroeconomic issues relevant to the firm.


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    ECON& 201 Micro Economics

    5 credits


    Examines the market economy including consumer demand, production, exchange, the price system, resource allocation and the role of government in the economy. Students analyze resource and income distribution, assess consumer and business behavior, and evaluate price determination and production cost.

    Prerequisites: MATH 098  or MATH 099  and ENGL 099  (or equivalent placement scores for any MATH& course and ENGL& 101  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Evaluate economic examples as related to personal incentives and voluntary exchanges
    • Explain the concept of opportunity cost
    • Define how traditional, command, and market forces affect the production and distribution of goods and services in a market economy and identify and analyze the interaction among these forces
    • Use economic reasoning, principles, and models to identify the possible causes and evaluate possible solutions for current microeconomic issues, such as productivity growth, wage differentials, and poverty
    • Compare and contrast the major traditions of economic thought as they apply to microeconomic theory and policy, in particular to the role of government in the market system.
    • Identify and explain the major forces impacting the distribution of income and wealth in modern U.S. capitalism, including the impact of discrimination
    • Identify and describe situations where market outcomes are socially undesirable, analyze the causes of market failure, and compare and contrast alternative remedies
    • Use graphical representations and economic models
    • Evaluate newspaper articles dealing with micro-economic issues 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

  
  •  

    ECON& 202 Macro Economics

    5 credits


    This is an introductory course emphasizing how the markets operate from the big (macro) picture. The course covers measurement of economic performance, national income accounting, aggregate supply and demand, fiscal policy, money creation/Federal Reserve system, monetary policy, inflation and unemployment.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 099  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain  economic policy
    • Apply the economic theories to personal and business situations


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50


Electronics

  
  •  

    ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I

    6 credits
    Electronics impacts all of our lives, this complete introduction to basic electricity/electronics principles with an emphasis on hands-on application of theory provides a solid foundation to anyone in the ” high-tech” workforce. A good look into how these electronics products really work.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) and ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use a Scientific a Calculator and Scientific Notation to perform basic calculations
    • Properly apply Industry Safety Precautions
    • Describe and use the Periodic Table of Elements as it pertains to electrical characteristics
    • Use Basic Formulas and apply the associated laws of physics for electronics
    • Correctly use Electronic Abbreviations, including the Greek Alphabet, Commonly Used Prefixes, Resistor Color Codes, Electronic Symbols and Semiconductor Schematic Symbols
    • Describe the Fundamentals of Electricity
    • Define Current, Voltage, and Resistance, and Power
    • Take Electrical measurements using a variety of Meters and standard electronics test equipment
    • Describe the fundamentals of DC Circuits
    • Define Magnetism, Inductance and Capacitance
    • Describe AC Circuits and Alternating Current
    • Define and demonstrate the ability to take AC Measurements as it pertains to Resistive, Capacitive, Inductive, and Resonant AC Circuits
    • Describe and demonstrate a working knowledge of Transformers
    • Successfully work in mixed teams to accomplish required tasks


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    ELEC 111 Computer Literacy For Electronics Professionals

    2 credits
    An introductory course, which develops an understanding of basic computer operations as they pertain to the electronics technical professional. Hardware and basic software applications are studied as well as industry specific software applications. Basic computer operations are studied.

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the basic configuration of a computer
    • Use a variety of common input/output devices
    • Explain the theory of the processing process
    • Detail storage devices and options
    • Differentiate between portable computer configurations
    • Describe the basic functionality of operating systems
    • Use basic application software, including Office applications
    • Use software applications specific to the electronics profession
    • Explain basic networking concepts
    • Use Internet search resources and optimize input using Boolean and other search parameters to achieve improved search results


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ELEC 113 Career Planning and Leadership I

    2 credits
    Focus on career objectives for the diverse electronics industry, leadership/ team skills, customer relations, occupational safety, hazardous material regulations, hiring practices and techniques, and workplace ethics unique to the electronics industry.

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • State the four basic properties on which electronics is based
    • List the branches of electronics
    • List the persons and companies largely responsible for the progression of electronics
    • Provide an overview of the Electronics Industry
    • Describe the duties of an Electronics Technician
    • Evaluate profiles of technicians
    • Describe the educational background of electronics professionals
    • Develop a career development portfolio
    • Explain the learning process for electronics students
    • Develop a personal inventory for professional development
    • Develop a plan for heightening skills
    • Develop a comprehensive plan for career search
    • Research a series of multinational companies and describe their internationally distributed design and manufacturing processes


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ELEC 114 Electronics Testing Processes and Techniques I

    2 credits


    A practical study of techniques and methods of basic electrical testing and parameter measurement. Component identification, technical methodology and practices that are utilized throughout the electronics industry are studied. Testing emphasis is on portable hand-held electronic test equipment, including VOMs and DMMs.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) and ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    ELEC 110  as either a prerequisite or corequisite

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Select and safely use laboratory power supplies for various applications
    • Describe the uses and operating principles of a D’Arsonval meter movements and safely use a D’Arsonval meter for an application
    • Select and safely use a DC ammeter and voltmeter for an application
    • Select and safely use an Ohmmeter for an application and describe the uses and operating principles of a Ohmmeter
    • Describe the uses and operating principles of a Megger and safely use a Megger for an application
    • Select and safely use an Analog Multimeter for an application and describe the uses and operating principles of an Analog Multimeter
    • Distinguish between the applications of a continuity test and an Ohmmeter measurement
    • Describe the uses and operating principles of a Digital Multimeter and select and safely use a Digital Multimeter
    • Determine need for equipment calibration and prepare calibration schedules for test instruments


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
  •  

    ELEC 115 Electronics Manufacturing Testing Techniques I

    5 credits
    Introduction to techniques and methods of fabrication that are utilized throughout the electronics industry. Basic manual electronic manufacturing techniques, safety procedures, and shop practices and techniques are explored, as well as proper hand tool selection, care and utilization.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher) and ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interpret and apply safety codes, policies, and practices, and accident prevention procedures
    • Apply recommended procedures for the safe handling, storage and disposal of hazardous materials using MSDS data to identify or label hazardous materials
    • Conduct safety inspections of shop environments, detect hazardous conditions and take corrective action
    • Use protective equipment and clothing to ensure personal health and safety in the workplace
    • Select, operate, and maintain hand, power tools and solder equipment safely
    • Apply basic soldering techniques including excess solder removal
    • Prepare common wire and cable assemblies
    • Repair sub-assemblies and replace electronic components on through-hole printed circuit board assemblies (PCBAs)
    • Apply regulatory and licensing requirements when completing installations, maintenance and repairs of electronic equipment
    • Analyze the soldering processes and the different types and applications of solder and solder flux
    • Select the correct soldering tip and temperature for the specific soldering and solder extraction application
    • Remove components using the following methods:  wicking, vacuum pulse; combination iron-sucker; heat and pull
    • Extract solder from:  through-hole mounted components; large thermal mass joints; terminals and socket mounted components
    • Install electronic components on single-sided and double-sided printed circuit boards following QA/QC procedures
    • Apply component handling precautions such as ESD precautionary techniques


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ELEC 116 Introduction to Programmable Logic Controllers

    5 credits
    Students will be familiarized with PLCs and learn automated manufacturing techniques and practices used to keep these machines operational.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 110  as either a prerequisite or corequisite

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interpret standard electrical control system symbols and codes commonly used in PLC operation and maintenance
    • Use both digital and analog Input/Output Modules with a PLC
    • Troubleshoot and validate Safety Circuits
    • Program Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for an industrial control application,  taking into account factors such as:  standard programming including timer and conter functions, data manipulation, program test procedures, and methods of implementing remote I/O operations
    • Implement communications and networking protocols used with PLCs
    • Analyze, implement and test a wide range of sensors
    • Interpret the basic characteristics and properties of fluids and solve problems involving fluids as it pertains to equipment operations and preventative maintenance
    • Analyze the dynamics of fluid flow and solve problems in discharges and viscosity
    • Interpret wiring diagrams, schematic diagrams and block diagrams as it pertains to equipment operations and preventative maintenance
    • Prepare and Maintain parts inventory and preventitive maintenance records and logs
    • Interpret and apply safety codes, policies and practices, and accident prevention procedures


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    ELEC 120 Introduction to Electronics II

    6 credits
    Continuation of ELEC 110 Introduction to Electronics I  in which semiconductors circuits both analog and digital electronics are explored. A variety of hands-on lab activities with applications enforce the classroom learning.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 110 

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe Semiconductor Fundamentals
    • Describe and demonstrate a working knowledge of PN Junction Diodes, Bipolar Transistors, Field Effect Transistors, and Thyristors
    • Describe the use of Integrated Circuits
    • Describe and demonstrate a working knowledge of Optoelectric Devices
    • Explain the functionality of  Linear Electronic Circuits and Power Supplies
    • Apply Amplifier Basics to demonstrate the implementation of circuits in Amplifier Applications
    • Use Oscillators and Waveshaping Circuits
    • Define and use the Binary number System
    • Use Basic Logic Gates in practical circuits
    • Use various methods of Simplifying Logic Circuits
    • Test and implement Sequential Logic Circuits, Combinational Logic Circuits and Digital Logic Symbols
    • Describe and demonstrate a working knowledge of Microprocessor Basics


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    ELEC 126 Electronics Manufacturing Testing Techniques II

    5 credits
    Introduction to surface mount techniques and advanced methods of fabrication that are utilized throughout the electronics industry. Basic manual electronic manufacturing techniques, safety procedures and shop practices and techniques are explored, as well as proper hand tool selection, care and utilization.

    Corequisites: ELEC 115  

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interpret and apply safety codes, policies, and practices, and accident prevention procedures
    • Apply recommended procedures for the safe handling, storage and disposal of hazardous materials using MSDS data to identify or label hazardous materials
    • Conduct safety inspections of shop environments, detect hazardous conditions and take corrective actions
    • Use protective equipment and clothing to ensure personal health and safety in the workplace
    • Select, operate, and maintain hand and power tools safely
    • Apply basic soldering techniques for surface mount and socket mounted components
    • Apply ESD procedures when handling surface mount electronic components
    • Prepare common wire and cable assemblies for surface mount combination assemblies
    • Repair sub-assemblies and replace electronic components on surface mount printed circuit board assemblies (PCBAs)
    • Apply regulatory and licensing requirements when completing installations, maintenance and repairs of surface mount applications
    • Analyze hand, wave and reflow soldering processes for surface mount technology applications
    • Maintain surface mount soldering-station components such as solder tips, solder extraction tips and solder collection chamber
    • Select the correct tools required to perform solder extraction on surface mount assemblies
    • Remove surface mount components using the following methods:  wicking, vacuum, pulse, combination iron-sucker, heat and pull
    • Install surface mount electronic components on single-sided and double-sided printed circuit boards following QA/QC procedures


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ELEC 130 Electricity and Electronics

    6 credits
    Fundamentals of physics as it relates to electricity and electronics are studied. Basic DC/AC theory including basic and intermediate circuit identification and analysis are explored.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 120  

    Corequisites: ELEC 137  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the fundamentals of atomic theory as applied to electronics
    • Define electrical current and its rules, measurement units, and values
    • Describe and define the terms energy, work, and power and their units of measure
    • Describe the difference between a series and a parallel circuit
    • State Kirchoff’s current law
    • Describe the AC power distribution system from the electric power plant to the home or industry
    • Explain how information carriers are used to carry many forms of information on different frequencies within the frequency spectrum
    • List and explain the factors determining capacitance and inductance
    • Describe impedance, phase angle, power and power factor
    • State Faraday’s and Lenz’s laws relating to electromagnetic induction
    • Describe the basic transformer and its application
    • Identify the difference between a series and parallel RCL circuit
    • Define Resonance, and explain the characteristics of Series Resonance and Parallel Resonance
    • Identify and explain the differences between passive filter types including: Low pass filter; High pass filter; Bandpass filter; Band stop filter
    • Use complex numbers in both rectangular and polar form
    • Describe how complex numbers apply to AC circuits containing series-parallel RCL components


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    ELEC 137 Introduction to Semi and Analog

    5 credits
    An introductory study of basic semiconductor theory as it applies to electronics applications. Basic PN junctions through operational amplifier configurations and applications are explored.

    Corequisites: ELEC 130  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the fundamental nature of semiconductor materials and its application in modern electronics
    • Describe the characteristics of and differences between the half-wave rectifier, the full-wave center tapped rectifier, and the full-wave bridge rectifier
    • Calculate ripple voltages and ripple frequencies of all rectifier types
    • Describe the operation and characteristics of an IC regulator
    • Name the three terminals of a bipolar junction transistor
    • Describe the two basic actions of a bipolar transistor:  ON/OFF switching action; Variable-resistor action
    • Explain the meaning of the following:  Transistor voltage and current abbreviations; DC alpha; DC beta; Collector characteristic curve; AC beta; Input resistance and impedance; Output resistance and impedance; Calculate a transistor circuit; DC current gain; AC current gain; Voltage gain; Power gain
    • Define the following terms:  DC load line; Cutoff point; Saturation point; Quiescent point.
    • Explain the JFET operation, and the following characteristics:  VP, VBR, IDSS, VGS(OFF); Transconductance; High input impedance
    • Describe how to test the various types of FET’s
    • Describe the symbol, package types, and internal block diagram of the operational amplifier and its application configurations


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
  •  

    ELEC 197 Electronics Capstone - Certificate Level

    5 credits
    All students are required to complete a capstone project prior to graduation as a final check of competency. Details are negotiated between the instructor and student to best fit the students’ individual area of interest within the field. This course is to be taken the final quarter of a certificate program.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission required

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize knowledge gained in the program to demonstrate competency in the field of electronics
    • Complete an assigned project from concept to final completion
    • Demonstrate for peers and undergo a peer review of materials, processes and methodology for their assigned project
    • Employ industry acceptable documentation techniques
    • Work independently and apply learned aspects of electronics to demonstrate competency in their chosen area of interest within the electronics industry
    • Communicate information to superiors, peers, and subordinates


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
  •  

    ELEC 211 Digital Electronics

    6 credits
    This course covers an introduction to logic fundamentals, numbering systems, codes, gates, truth tables, DeMorgan’s theorem, basic Boolean theorems, and combination logic circuits including PLDs and PGAs. The course combines lecture sessions with intensive hands-on lab experiments.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 137  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Distinguish between analog and digital representation
    • Convert from the hexadecimal or octal number system to either the decimal or the binary number system
    • Identify BCD code, ASCII code, and Hexadecimal code
    • Describe the operation of and construct the truth table for the AND, NAND, OR, NOR gates
    • Use Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, and simulation software as tools to design logic circuits
    • Design simple logic circuits without help of a truth table
    • Write the Boolean expression for the logic gates and combinations of logic gates
    • Construct and analyze the operation of a latch / flip-flop made from NAND or NOR gates
    • Connect shift registers as data transfer circuits
    • Operate flip-flops as used to build frequency dividers, counters and shift registers
    • Use and program a PLD using industry standard software and modeling tools
    • Develop and utilize applications for Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs)
    • Use a JTAG interface to reprogram a CPLD


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    ELEC 213 Career Plan and Leadership II

    2 credits
    Continuation of ELEC 113 Career Planning and Leadership I . Focus on continued development of career objectives for the electronics industry including leadership/team skills, occupational safety, hazardous material regulations, hiring practices and techniques, and workplace ethics.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 113  

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • List the persons and companies largely responsible for the continued progression of electronics
    • Explain the process and people involved in the development of a product
    • Describe the duties of an Electronics Technician
    • Describe the educational background of electronics professionals
    • Practice fundamental human relations skills
    • Develop a career portfolio
    • Develop fundamental technical interview experience
    • Detail advanced learning options and techniques for technicians
    • Explain the process in securing a position
    • Update their personal inventory for professional development
    • Reshape their personal plan for continuing development in their electronics knowledge
    • Implement a comprehensive plan for a career search


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ELEC 214 Troubleshooting Electronic Circuits

    4 credits
    Covers troubleshooting techniques in a wide variety of circuits found in electronic systems. DC and AC voltage analysis are used to troubleshoot to component level in power supplies, bipolar/FET audio and RF amplifiers, oscillators, and op-amp circuits.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 137  as either a prerequisite or corequisite

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon the successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize the concept and use flow charts, step by step procedures and methodologies for troubleshooting systems
    • Discuss philosophies of repair for various situations
    • Describe the importance of block diagrams as an aid in troubleshooting
    • Analyze DC and AC for incorrect voltages applied to a circuit in order to locate the defective component
    • Describe the concept of signal tracing, signal injection, and signature analysis
    • Test and measurement of electrical parameters of amplifiers, oscillators, power supplies and op-amp circuits
    • Test and measure voltages of circuits employing a defective component
    • Analyze a system to determine the root cause of a device failure


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ELEC 216 Mechatronics

    4 credits
    Continuation of SOLID-STATE I. Covers AC analysis of bipolar small-signal transistors, including computer modeling of circuits. DC/AC analysis of large-signal amplifiers is also included. The course combines lecture sessions with intensive hands-on lab experiments.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 116  

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use both digital and analog Input/Output Modules with a PLC
    • Program Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) and embedded systemsfor industrial control and monitoring applications
    • Analyze, implement and test a wide range of sensors and apply transfer functions of a given sensor to correctly program a response from a system
    • Interpret the characteristics and properties of hydraulic systems and solve problems involving hydraulic principles as it pertains to equipment operations and preventative maintenance
    • Interpret the characteristics and properties of pneumatic systems and solve problems involving pneumatic principles as it pertains to equipment operations and preventative maintenance
    • Demonstrate an understanding of control processes such as closed versus open loop, analog versus digital,  and linear versus non linear control systems as it pertains to equipment operation
    • Analyze the basic dynamics of simple mechanical devices (levers, gears, etc.) and interface to electronics control and monitoring systems and circuits
    • Prepare and Maintain parts inventory and preventitive maintenance records and logs
    • Interpret and apply safety codes, policies and practices, and accident prevention procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ELEC 217 Data Acquisition and Analysis

    5 credits
    Course exposes students to data acquisition principles involving monitoring and/or controlling signals with a computer in a scientific, testing, or manufacturing environment. Students gain experience in real-world data acquisition applications.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 211  as either a prerequisite or corequisite

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the fundamental principles of Data Acquisition
    • Implement electronic instrumentation and basic measurement
    • Define process measurement and control
    • Demonstrate applications using real world sensors and input signal conditioning
    • Utilize interfacing techniques to the PC
    • Create programs to successfully integrate Automatic Test Equipment (ATE)
    • Cite and demonstrate proper techniques for displaying and analyzing data
    • Perform basic statistical analysis on data and arrive at correct conclusions based on data
    • Demonstrate proficiency in safety, lab techniques, troubleshooting within a team environment
    • Give and accept direction and constructive feedback from peers 


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ELEC 221 FCC/CET Preparation

    1 credits
    This course is designed to aid the electronics student to pass the FCC “General Radiotelephone” license exam (FCC Element I and III). Also covered are topics covered in the CET “Associate” level exam enabling students to be certified by ETA, International. Both the FCC and CET license examinations are offered at Lake Washington Institute of Technology for additional fees. See instructor for details.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 137  

    Corequisites: ELEC 223 

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon the successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe several of the more important FCC rules and regulations as contained in Element I
    • Identify and review electronic concepts contained in FCC Element III
    • Identify and review electronic concepts contained in the CET “Associate” level exam
    • Describe safety precautions as outlined in the CET “Associate” level exam


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10
  
  •  

    ELEC 223 Communication Electronics

    5 credits
    This course is an introduction to electronic communications covering topics on electrical noise, AM/FM modulation and demodulation techniques, transmission lines, electromagnetic wave propagation, antenna systems, and basic fiber optic techniques. The course combines lecture sessions with intensive hands-on lab experiments.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 137  

    Corequisites: ELEC 221  

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018, Fall 2018, SPring 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify noise sources inherent in communication systems
    • List the identifying characteristics of common oscillator circuits
    • Explain the concept of positive feedback utilized in oscillator circuits
    • Construct, test and observe the operation of an RF oscillator circuit
    • Construct, test and observe heterodyning, AM, FM and SSB generation in the lab
    • Describe simple modulation systems using block diagrams
    • Draw a block diagram of a superheterodyne receiver and correctly label all blocks
    • Describe the differences between  superheterodyne AM/FM receiver systems
    • Construct, test and observe the operation of a superheterodyne receiver
    • Compare AM with FM in regards to the method of transmitting frequency and amplitude of intelligence
    • Draw current and voltage distribution on a half-wavelength dipole antenna
    • Describe basic concepts of radio wave propagation
    • Describe several basic antenna systems
    • Compare Marconi and Hertz antennas by stating their differences
    • Observe standing waves (voltage nodes) on a dipole antenna
    • Calculate the resonant frequency of a dipole antenna
    • Describe the differences between resonant and non-resonant transmission lines
    • Describe basic fiber optic techniques used for data transmission
    • Construct, test and observe the operation of a fiber optic transmission system


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ELEC 224 Electronic Circuits

    5 credits
    Course covers DC/AC analysis of basic FET devices with DC/AC amplifier analysis and a study of the thyristor family. Computer modeling of FET amplifiers is used to enhance understanding. Also includes a study of frequency effects on amplifier operation, and a study of oscillator and regulated power supply circuits. This course teaches to the global outcome of Information and Technical Literacy.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 137 

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the operation of FET devices and their role in amplification
    • State common biasing methods for FET circuits
    • Approximate FET input/output impedances and gain
    • List the major parameters of FET configurations
    • Computer model DC/AC FET amplifiers and interpret the data
    • Construct, test and analyze the operation of several FET amplifier circuits in the lab
    • Name and recognize the schematic symbol of common thyristor devices
    • Explain the operation of a SCR and Triac circuit used to control power to a load
    • Construct, test and analyze a thyristor circuit in the lab
    • Describe the effects that frequency has on amplifier operation
    • Name several selected oscillator circuits by viewing their schematic diagrams
    • Construct, test and analyze the operation of oscillator circuits in the lab
    • Compare linear regulated power supplies with switch-mode power supplies
    • Describe the theory of linear regulated and switch-mode power supplies
    • Construct, test and analyze the operation of regulated power supplies in the lab
    • Use complex numbers in both rectangular and polar form
    • Read and interpret datasheets from a variety of sources, including the internet, and apply the data obtained to devices used


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ELEC 225 Linear Circuits

    5 credits
    Course covers basic and advanced topics on differential amplifiers and op-amp IC circuits. Op-amp negative feedback is covered. Also includes the study of several selected linear and non-linear op-amp circuits, including active filters.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 137  

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Model DC/AC operation of differential amplifiers
    • Construct, test and analyze the operation of a differential amplifier
    • Understand the operation and use of a typical op-amp IC
    • Construct, test and analyze the operation of op-amp IC filter circuits
    • Construct, test and analyze the operation of voltage comparators


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ELEC 226 Introduction to Automation/Electomechanical

    4 credits
    Operation and maintenance of an Automated Manufacturing Cell is explored, with plenty of hands on experience.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 216  

    Quarters Offered: Winter 2018

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interpret standard electrical control system symbols commonly used in  instrumentation as it pertains to equipment operation
    • Analyze and test  industry standard  motor control circuits as it pertains to equipment operation and test examples of stepper, servo, DC and AC induction motor drive circuits
    • Model and use basic sensors and their support circuits (proximity sensors, temperature transducers, flow sensors, encoders, position sensors,  pressure sensors, accelerometers, load cells, etc.)
    • Apply current loops and interface support circuitry for data transmission in noisy envrionments
    • Demonstrate an understanding of control processes such as: closed versus open‑loop, analog versus digital,  linear versus non‑linear control systems as it pertains to equipment operation
    • Operate  and test data collection systems such as those employing bar coding, magnetic, RFID tag technologies as it pertains to equipment operation
    • Operate a variety  of HMI (Humand Machine Interfaces) used in automation
    • Interpret flow charts and block diagrams as it pertains to automation operations and repair
    • Interpret electronic technical manuals and bulletins as it pertains to equipment maintanence
    • Prepare and Maintain operation logs as it pertains to equipment operations
    • Interpret and apply safety codes, policies and practices, and accident prevention procedures
    • Use a block diagram programming techniques to create algorithmic instructions for use by robotic systems and devices


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ELEC 232 Digital Electronics Lab

    6 credits
    Students apply previously studied theory and circuits in the planning, development and prototyping of a digital system. The digital system developed will have a direct application to an identified branch of the electronics industry.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 211  and ELEC 237  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize ROM, Ram, EEPROM or FLASH memory devices
    • Employ operational characteristics for Arithmetic Circuits
    • Develop and utilize applications for Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs) or Microcontrollers
    • Apply applications for Encoders
    • Develop applications including various flip-flops
    • Utilize the application of counters
    • Implement basic Microprocessor Architecture
    • Apply the application of Shift Registers, either independently or within a microcontroller or PLD
    • Utilize logic gates to perform arithmetic operations within digital circuitry
    • Utilize interfacing between digital and analog circuits
    • Develop an application utilizing digital electronics
    • Research the parameters and controls necessary to use a digital system to control real-world devices and systems.  Report findings in a standard industry document format


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
  •  

    ELEC 233 IPC-A-610 Certification Program

    5 credits
    Attain this coveted industry based Electronics certification. This training and certification has immediate recognition, legitimacy and value throughout the electronics industry. This certification will demonstrate your commitment to customer requirements and greatly assist any company dedicated to ISO-9000 or other quality assurance initiatives.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 126  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the role and responsibilities of Certified Technicians
    • Cite criteria for acceptable laminate conditions
    • Evaluate soldered connection requirements for plated-through holes
    • Evaluate surface mounting criteria for chip components, leadless and leaded chip carriers
    • Demonstrate swaged hardware, and heat-sink requirements of mechanical assemblies
    • Cite component-mounting criteria for DIPS, socket pins, and card edge connectors
    • Demonstrate discrete wiring assembly requirements
    • Cite solder fillet dimensional criteria for all major SMT component groups
    • Demonstrate an understanding of SMT soldering anomalies, such as tombstoning, dewetting, and other common assembly problems


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    ELEC 234 IPC/WHMA-A-620 Certification Program

    5 credits
    Attain this internationally recognized industry based Electronics certification that has immediate recognition, legitimacy and value throughout the electronics industry. This certification includes many aspects of cable and harness fabrication. Candidates must meet IPC requirements to attain certification. Students are required to pass the IPC/WHMA-A-620 certification to receive a passing grade.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 126  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the role and responsibilities of Certified Technicians
    • Cite criteria for acceptable soldered terminations
    • Demonstrate and evaluate applicable crimping techniques
    • Cite and demonstrate processes used for soldered termination preparation
    • Evaluate coaxial cable requirements
    • Demonstrate coaxial cable preparation and termination techniques
    • Demonstrate and evaluate wire-harness preparation and assembly techniques
    • Cite and demonstrate processes used for coaxial cable preparation
    • Function effectively in interactions with individuals, within group situations, and within professional organizations and systems


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    ELEC 237 Introduction to Microprocessors and Microcontrollers

    5 credits
    Introduces the microcontroller and its applications. Students learn how to program, analyze, troubleshoot, interface, and design electronic systems based on micro-technology, including industrial, consumer, and microcomputer systems.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 211  as either a prerequisite or corequisite

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the basic functions of the microprocessor
    • Identify and describe basic microprocessor  architecture
    • Create simple programs using computer instruction sets and block diagrams
    • Describe the operation and use of a microcontroller
    • Successfully create complex microcontroller applications both in hardware and software.
    • Download and run programs on an evaluation board
    • Implement a systemic approach to solving a control problem using modern micro-processing devices


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ELEC 239 Printed Circuit Board Layout and Design

    6 credits
    Introduction to Printed Circuit Board Layout and Schematic capture. Students will modify and create libraries from part datasheets and use them to create schematics and layout PCB’s for various circuits.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission required

    Quarters Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Winter 2019

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the basic manufacturing processes used in PCB construction
    • Describe the components, file types and the key processes (such as verification, design rule checking, and annotation) in schematic capture and layout processes
    • Use PCB schematic capture and layout software
    • Integrate the basics of good PCB layout, including calculations of trace width for current handling capability and impedance, to successfully complete a PCB design
    • Successfully create complex PCBs from schematic capture to output file generation (Gerber files)
    • Create industry standard documentation necessary for the production of PCBs


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    ELEC 297 Electronics Capstone - Degree Level

    4 credits
    Capstone course for 200 Level electronics classes and degrees. All students are required to complete a capstone project prior to graduation as a final check of competency. Exact details are negotiated between the instructor and student to best fit the students’ individual area of interest within the field. This course is to be taken the final quarter of a degree program.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission required

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize knowledge gained in the program to demonstrate competency in the field of electronics
    • Complete an assigned project from concept to final completion
    • Demonstrate for peers and undergo a peer review of materials, processes and methodology
    • Employ industry acceptable documentation techniques
    • Work independently and apply learned aspects of electronics to demonstrate competency in their chosen area of interest within the electronics industry.  The chosen area of interest is directly related to the certificate the student is expecting to be awarded
    • Communicate information to superiors, peers, and subordinates
    • Self-assess learning needs and design, implement, and evaluate strategies to promote intellectual growth and continued professional competence


    Total Hours: 80 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
  •  

    LASR 201 Fundamentals of Light and Lasers

    6 credits
    This course will provide students with a basic understanding of light and its integration into opto-electronic devices (e.g. lasers). Safety standards and procedures will be emphasized throughout the course to thoroughly familiarize the student with the proper photonics work environment. This course is built upon a comprehensive laboratory program that develops a practical intuition to complement conceptual understanding. Application of optical principles to the analysis and characterization of laser systems is emphasized.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 110 , ELEC 120 , and MATH 098  or MATH 099  (or placement scores for any MATH& course), or instructor permission

    Corequisites: PHYS& 114  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define the wide variety of employment opportunities available to Opto-electronic Technicians
    • Define these properties of light: wavelength, frequency, speed, amplitude, energy, phase, coherence, and polarization
    • Describe the electromagnetic spectrum and diagram the main optical regions
    • Describe safety procedures to be followed when working with lasers and optics
    • Demonstrate how to set up optical systems involving optical components, optical benches, and optical diagnostic equipment
    • Demonstrate how to handle, store, clean, and characterize optical components
    • Distinguish between laser and non-laser types of light sources and identify their characteristics
    • Describe the following basic laser classifications based on the appropriate hazards: Class 1, 2, 3a, 3b, and 4
    • Practice and communicate laser safety and describe eye damage related to wavelength (different wavelength regimes for Cornea, Lens and Retinal damage) and exposure times
    • Describe optical systems in terms of fundamental physical optics: waves, rays, reflection, refraction, dispersion, critical angle, thin and thick lenses, F-number, and numerical aperture
    • Describe optical phenomena and systems in terms of fundamental physical optics: Huygen’s principle, constructive & destructive interference, diffraction patterns, Brewsters angle, and polarizers
    • Describe waveguide TIR Principles and their importance in current technologies 
    • Describe and characterize the output of laser light in terms of wavelength, optical waist, power, irradiance, Rayleigh range, and divergence


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    LASR 210 Laser and Optical Systems and Applications

    5 credits
    This course will provide students with a fundamental overview and understanding of the most common types of laser and optical sources and their associated applications. Laser assembly, alignment, and diagnostics will form the foundation of this course. The student will develop a working knowledge of He-Ne, CO2, diode, Nd:YAG, Ar+, and fiber laser systems. LED lighting and Photodiode detection systems will also be covered. Laboratory and hands on learning are emphasized. Safety standards and procedures will be emphasized throughout the course to thoroughly familiarize the student with the proper photonics work environment. 

    Prerequisites: LASR 201  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Determine focused beam spot size and location
    • Measure laser power output (peak and average)
    • Measure and calculate power density
    • Use an IR alignment scope
    • Assemble and characterize CW, pulsed, and Q-switched laser sources
    • Generate 2nd  harmonic (e.g. use KTP) for different laser formats demonstrating peak-power benefits
    • Describe basic optical harmonic conversion and Energy and Momentum Conservation
    • Evaluate the use and appropriateness of lasers for common engineering metrology applications
    • Calculate optical beam propagation through free space and fibers
    • Describe safety procedures to be followed when working with lasers and optics
    • Describe and demonstrate fiber coupling and operation and apply the principles to optimize fiber coupling efficiency
    • Specify the proper laser sources for common applications 
    • Describe the safety precautions and lab protective gear for laser systems: Class 1, 2, 3a, 3b, and 4
    • Set up and align Michelson interferometers and define optical interference and its basic uses in industry
    • Describe, measure, and apply correctly radiometric and luminous flux definitions and measurments
    • Describe and characterize the output of laser light in terms of wavelength, optical waist, power, irradiance, Rayleigh range, and divergence


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
  •  

    LASR 220 Communication, Imaging, and Remote Sensing

    6 credits
    This course will provide the student with a fundamental overview and understanding of common Photonics applications. Students will develop an in-depth understanding of fiber optic communication and non-contact measurement photonic systems and acquire skills that have broad based industry relevance. Industry standard documentation and work place performance will be covered thoroughly. This course is built upon a comprehensive laboratory program that develops a practical intuition to complement conceptual understanding. Safety standards and procedures will be emphasized throughout the course to thoroughly familiarize the student with the proper photonics work environment.

    Prerequisites: LASR 201  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Measure and calculate coupler split ratio
    • Measure power and compare with power budget to assess performance of given fiber-optic systems
    • Determine dispersion characteristics of optical fibers
    • Use erbium-doped fiber amplifiers for signal regeneration
    • Install and use electro-optic (EO) and acousto-optic (AO) devices (e.g. Q-switching)
    • Use mechanical splices to join fibers
    • Interpret and implement general imaging requirements
    • Set up and align Mach-Zehnder interferometers
    • Perform setup and calibration of imaging systems
    • Measure wavefront aberrations
    • Perform digital image processing
    • Design and test photodetector circuits
    • Setup and describe basic focal plane array system (e.g. CCD’s)
    • Analyze and evaluate interferometric fringe patterns


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60

Engineering

  
  •  

    ENGR 100 College Success in Engineering

    3 credits


    The primary goal of this course is to provide students with the resources needed to make an informed decision about future education and career goals and to make those goals reality. This course provides an orientation to the educational options and professional opportunities in engineering. Students will develop academic and personal skills and attitudes that promote success in college study.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Students should enroll in ENGR 100 in their first quarter of the Computer and Electrical Pre-Engineering, Associate in Science Transfer  or Mechanical, Civil, Aeronautical, Industrial, Materials Science Pre-Engineering, Associate in Science Transfer .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Develop goals for college study and identify strategies (including financial, time, stress and health management) to achieve them
    • Distinguish among different fields of engineering and engineering technology
    • Prepare an academic plan leading to an Associate degree and successful transfer in engineering
    • Outline the specific job opportunities and educational requirements in at least one field of engineering
    • Demonstrate attitudes and learning strategies that promote success in STEM study
    • Successfully navigate campus resources and services including the college website, learning management system, student financial services, and various student support services
    • Define, explore, and discuss the importance of diversity in today’s classroom and community


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
  •  

    ENGR 110 Introduction to Engineering I: Modeling and Analysis

    5 credits
    A project-based introduction to engineering analysis, problem solving, and mathematical modeling. Working in teams, students will complete a series of hands-on projects designed to emphasize a systematic, analytical problem solving approach and explore the engineering disciplines at a technical level. Topics include: introductory engineering concepts; engineering for sustainability; teamwork skills; the application of mathematics, physics, and chemistry in engineering; unit systems; and an introduction to spreadsheet applications.

    Prerequisites: ENGR 100 MATH& 151 , and PHYS& 221  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use estimation to make order of magnitude calculations in the absence of data
    • Properly apply the rules for handling significant figures in arithmetic
    • Perform dimensional and unit analysis
    • Manipulate formulas to perform sensitivity analysis of systems in one or more variables
    • Prepare and interpret graphs following accepted standards in engineering and science
    • Perform introductory spreadsheet calculations such as cell-reference equations, descriptive statistics, and graphing
    • Demonstrate application of engineering problem solving processes
    • Describe elements of the engineering design process
    • Participate in developing functional project teams
    • Communicate technical information in a clear, concise, and accurate fashion through both written and oral presentation
    • Produce effective visual aids for oral presentations


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    ENGR& 114 Engineering Graphics

    5 credits
    This course introduces methods of communicating technical information in engineering design. Students will use 3D parametric Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software to create solid models and fabrication drawings. The roles of engineers, designers, and drafters, and how they relate in an engineering environment, will be covered.

    Prerequisites: ENGR 100  

    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ENGR& 204 Electrical Circuits

    5 credits
    This course is an introduction to electrical engineering. Topics covered include basic circuit and systems concepts and resistors, sources, capacitors, inductors, and operational amplifiers. Students will solve first- and second-order linear differential equations associated with basic circuit forms.

    Prerequisites: PHYS& 222  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Solve electric circuits using node and mesh analysis
    • Apply Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems to circuit analysis
    • Articulate the basic laws of capacitors and inductors
    • Demonstrate the use of differential equations in the analysis of resistance-inductance-capacitance (RLC) circuits
    • Describe an ideal operational amplifier (op amp) and use it in circuits
    • Differentiate between applications using linear and nonlinear resistors and diodes
    • Solve first-order and second-order switched circuits
    • Analyze single-phase and three-phase sinusoidal steady state circuits


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ENGR& 214 Statics

    5 credits
    This course emphasizes the proper utilization of vector algebra and free body diagrams to solve problems in engineering statics through the use of Newton’s Laws.  Vectors are used to describe the action of forces and moments acting on particles and rigid bodies, which are fixed in space or undergoing uniform motion.  The six major areas of study are: vector algebra of forces and moments, free body diagrams and equilibria of particles and rigid bodies, centroids and centers of gravity, internal forces of trusses and frames, friction and applications to machines, and moments of inertia.

    Prerequisites: PHYS& 221  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Draw complete free body diagrams (FBD) and write appropriate equilibrium equations for the FBD, including support reactions
    • Solve equilibrium problems through the use of Newton’s Laws
    • Apply the concepts of equilibrium to various structures
    • Calculate moments, centers of mass, and forces for particular structures
    • Apply vector algebra principles to solving statics problems
    • Analyze and solve problems in statics through the logical application of the basic principles of classical mechanics


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ENGR& 215 Dynamics

    5 credits
    This course covers a vector treatment of kinematics and kinetics of particles in rectilinear and curvilinear motion followed by the study of rigid bodies in general plane motion. Newton’s Second Law along with the principles of work and energy, impulse and momentum, and conservation of energy will be applied to a large selection of problems dealing with the interactions of bodies and force systems.

    Prerequisites: ENGR& 214  and MATH 238  

  
  •  

    ENGR& 224 Thermodynamics

    5 credits
    This course covers fundamentals of thermodynamics, basic principles from macroscopic point of view, and concepts such as systems and their behavior, energy and heat transfer, first and second law of thermodynamics, and methodology for problem solving. This course also discusses the application of thermodynamics laws to engineering systems such as vapor power plants, combustion engines, refrigerators, and heat pump systems.

    Prerequisites: CHEM& 162 MATH& 152 , and PHYS& 223    

    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ENGR& 225 Mechanics of Materials

    5 credits
    This combined lecture-lab course provides engineering students with the fundamental principles and basic concepts used in the study of the engineering behavior of structures and mechanical members subjected to slowly applied or steady state loading conditions. The course will cover the basic relationships between axial, torsion, bending and shear loading acting on solid elements such as rods, shafts, columns and beams and their allowable stresses, strains and deformations. It will also cover Mohr’s circle of stresses and strains.

    Prerequisites: CHEM& 161  and MATH 220  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply the knowledge of statics, properties of materials, and basic mathematics to analyze the stress-strain behavior of structural members subjected to slowly applied or steady state loads
    • Differentiate between various static loading conditions of simple structures and formulate progressive solutions to quantify their stress-strain behavior
    • Work individually and function as part of a team to
      • Analyze the stress-strain behavior of simple structural elements under combined loading conditions
      • Design simple beams to meet specific design needs
      • Effectively communicate the results of this work in coherent and legible calculations


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

English

  
  •  

    ENGL 093 Beginning English

    5 credits
    Instruction in basic sentence grammar and the essentials of writing sentences and paragraphs; an introduction to essays. Review of study skills necessary for college success also provided.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and use fundamental grammar principles
    • Identify and use fundamental sentence structure principles
    • Identify and use fundamental punctuation principles
    • Develop proofreading skills
    • Develop paragraph-writing skills
    • Write brief messages, memos, and letters
    • Write brief summaries of material


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    ENGL 099 Intro to Essay Writing

    5 credits
    This course presents grammar and paragraph review and instruction in writing thesis-driven essays. Students will write a minimum of 3500 words of finished composition during the quarter.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099)

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Speak, comprehend, read and write English fluently at a college level
    • Apply the writing process to create finished compositions
    • Exercise basic critical thinking skills to analyze and express ideas in writing
    • Demonstrate awareness of audience in written compositions
    • Develop well-structured paragraphs with very few grammar mistakes
    • Recognize and write thesis-driven essays including introductions, developments and conclusions
    • Use basic editing skills to revise writing


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    ENGL 335 Technical Writing for Designers

    5 credits


    Students will learn to convey written technical information in appropriate formats for various audiences. They will learn how to gather information, document sources, edit and format writing, and collaborate in order to produce effective technical communications. An emphasis will be placed on refining research skills.

    Prerequisites: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission.

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Analyze writing at the sentence and paragraph level in order to choose effective revision strategies
    • Produce writing that is correct, clear, professional, and stylistically effective
    • Use formatting and graphics to enhance the clarity of communication
    • Employ a wide range of editing skills to take writing through stages of revision
    • Produce writing appropriate to various technical situations, including online help, user manuals, technical manuals, training materials, business papers and reports
    • Research, integrate, and document information required for various technical projects
    • Produce writing that adheres to academic and professional ethical standards
    • Produce writing that communicates effectively to diverse, multicultural audiences
    • Work collaboratively to produce effective technical communication
    • Complete a technical writing project related to the student’s particular professional interests


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

  
  •  

    ENGL& 101 English Composition I

    5 credits
    Advanced expository writing, reading and evaluating essays, and critical thinking are covered in this course that fulfills the written communication requirement for an AAS degree. Students will write a minimum of 5000 words of finished composition during the quarter.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 099  (or placement into ENGL& 101)

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Consistently apply the stages of the writing process to create finished compositions
    • Consistently exercise critical thinking skills to analyze and express ideas in writing
    • Analyze and evaluate the structural components of written texts
    • Draft and edit effectively structured essays to suit audience and purpose
    • Employ basic research and library skills to locate and evaluate information
    • Synthesize and cite sources using accepted documentation styles


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    ENGL& 102 English Composition II

    5 credits


    Students learn to write fully documented research papers using critical thinking and reading skills. The class will emphasize logical argumentation from evidence and research skills necessary to collect relevant information. Students will write a minimum of 5000 words of finished composition during the quarter.

    Prerequisites: ENGL& 101 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Consistently demonstrate strong critical thinking skills in both reading and writing
    • Write college level compositions to suit audience and purpose
    • Apply the strategies of effective argument
    • Employ a range of research and library skills to locate and evaluate information
    • Write effective research documents that synthesize and cite sources using accepted documentation styles

     

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

  
  •  

    ENGL& 111 Intro to Literature

    5 credits
    This course presents an overview of three important genres of literature: fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will learn and use critical skills to analyze and write about selected works in these genres.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 099  (or placement into ENGL& 101  or higher)

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • List the structural elements of the genres: poetry, drama, fiction
    • Apply a range of terms specific to the study of literature to works of fiction, poetry, or drama
    • Demonstrate critical-thinking skills when evaluating and analyzing a literary work
    • Apply one or more critical strategies in the interpretation of literary works
    • Explain the interrelationship between cultural and historical factors and literature
    • Employ synthesis to compare and contrast literary works and to incorporate research into writing
    • Apply the writing process when analyzing literature
    • List a range of significant past and current authors


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    ENGL& 235 Technical Writing

    5 credits
    Students will learn to design, format, and produce documents common in business and industry. Emphasis will be placed on efficiently developing accurate, clear, concise, and visually accessible technical communication. Research techniques for technical writing will be introduced.

    Prerequisites: ENGL& 101  

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon the successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate critical thinking and clear, organized expression in documents and researched reports
    • Produce clear, concise, accurate and visually accessible documents for specified audiences
    • Apply research skills specific to industry-related information sources
    • Demonstrate professional standards in writing ethics, punctuality, and work production
    • Effectively address in written documents audiences diverse in culture and industrial specialties, as well as in professional interests and responsibilities


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

English as a Second Language

  
  •  

    EASL 010 ESL Orientation

    1 credits


    This course is for students who took the ESL placement test and plan to enroll in the English as a Second Language program at Lake Washington Institute of Technology.

    Prerequisites: CASAS ESL appraisal and instructor’s permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain ESL placement  and class sequence and familiarize with the notion of certificates and degrees
    • Interpret and use vocabulary on LWIT forms such as registration, tuition waiver, release of information, etc.
    • Locate and use campus resources such as the Academic Skills Center, Library, bookstore, registration, financial aid, etc.
    • Identify community medical, legal, and other resources available to immigrants and refugees
    • Select realistic educational and professional goals
    • Complete the ESL transition electronic survey
    • Navigate the LWIT website and register on-line for ESL classes

     

    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10

  
  •  

    EASL 015 Beginning ESL Literacy

    1-12 credits


    This course is for students beginning to study English as a second language. It teaches survival English, with a focus on speaking and listening.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     

    • Listening:
      • Understand the relationship between letters and sounds
      • Respond appropriately to simple questions, statements, and high frequency commands as part of simplified conversations
      • Master a few simple formulas to convey understanding and ask for repetition or clarification

     

    • Speaking:
      • Apply simple sentences and appropriate nonverbal behavior to express needs
      • Learn basic survival vocabulary to describe objects or report an activity
      • Use a limited set of learned words and phrases related to basic personal information and a limited number of activities in familiar and predictable communication tasks

     

    • Reading:
      • Demonstrate familiarity with concepts of letter names and sounds (individual consonants and vowels), and common vocabulary
      • Read and understand dates and time in general
      • Recognize everyday words or word groups in short, simple text and on personal information forms applying basic phonics rules

     

    • Writing:
      • Write upper/lower case letters legibly and appropriately using simple, everyday, highly familiar words (personal names, signatures, addresses)
      • Write numbers (dates, phones #s, prices) and simple phrases to convey information
      • Write simple sentences using the Simple Present and Present Continuous 


    Total Hours: 120 Lecture Hours: 120

  
  •  

    EASL 016 Low Beginning ESL

    1-12 credits


    This course continues teaching basic functional English but has an increasing emphasis on beginning reading and writing.

    Prerequisites: EASL 015  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     

    • Listening:
      • Understand and respond to simple requests and to ask for repetition and clarification
      • Differentiate statements from questions based on grammar and intonation
      • Use sentences and appropriate non-verbal and visual clues to express needs
    • Speaking:
      • Use basic vocabulary and simple sentence structure to describe people or objects
      • Use a limited set of learned words, phrases, and short sentences related to basic personal information
      • Initiate and maintain simple conversations by applying such strategies as gestures, eye contact, and simple, repeated requests
    • Reading:
      • Read and understand schedules, calendars, and other data sources
      • Use context clues to decode and recognize familiar words in short, simple text by breaking words into parts
      • Read and understand U.S. measurement for weight, volume, distance, and temperature
      • Read short passages and identify the main idea and some details
    • Writing:
      • Fill out personal information and other forms accurately and neatly
      • Use everyday vocabulary to write a few related sentences on a single topic
      • Make simple edits of grammar, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation based on review and feedback from others


    Total Hours: 120 Lecture Hours: 120

  
  •  

    EASL 024 Workplace Communications I

    1-8 credits
    This course is designed to improve workplace communication for beginning level ESL and ABE students. Topics will include beginning phonics and pronunciation, helpful reading techniques for the workplace, interpretation of safety procedures, general work procedures.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate placement test score.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Ask for, give, follow and clarify directions
    • Interpret and apply general work-related vocabulary
    • Interpret product label directions, warnings, danger signs, and symbols
    • Use content tables, indices, dictionaries
    • Identify safe work procedures


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 80
  
  •  

    EASL 025 Workplace Communications II

    1-8 credits
    This course is designed to improve workplace communication for intermediate ESL and ABE students. Topics will include the interpretation of work-related vocabulary, safety procedures, handbooks, charts, performance reviews and benefits.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate placement test score.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Ask for, give, follow and clarify directions
    • Interpret general work-related vocabulary
    • Recognize and use occupational signs, charts, forms, and written directions
    • Interpret job responsibilities and performance reviews
    • Interpret employee handbooks, work safety manuals, and related publications
    • Identify safe work procedures
    • Interpret wages, deductions, and benefits
    • Participate in meetings


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 80
  
  •  

    EASL 030 High Beginning ESL

    1-15 credits


    In this course students will practice and improve communication skills with an equal emphasis on listening, speaking, reading and writing.

    Prerequisites: EASL 016  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     

    • Listening
      • Distinguish voice patterns for questions, statements and imperatives
      • Understand and respond to conversations, instructions, and narratives in the form of basic connected discourse on familiar topics related to personal background/needs and everyday tasks
      • Apply background knowledge to understand the intent of the speaker
    • Speaking
      • Use vocabulary related to common/everyday topics or personal experience  and basic sentence structure in familiar/predictable communication tasks
      • Use simple strategies (such as making and responding requests for feedback repetition, and rephrasing) to meet the speaking purpose
    • Reading
      • Demonstrate familiarity with simple, everyday knowledge and vocabulary
      • Read simple stories and understand main messages
      • Use various strategies such as restating and rephrasing text, and use a simplified dictionary
    • Writing
      • Complete information on forms
      • Use familiar vocabulary and simple sentence structure to produce several sentences on a topic
      • Make simple edits of grammar, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation


    Total Hours: 150 Lecture Hours: 150

  
  •  

    EASL 040 Low Intermediate ESL

    1-15 credits


    Students continue improving their communication skills with an emphasis on reading and writing to enhance their participation in the community and on the job.

    Prerequisites: EASL 030  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     

    • Reading
      • Locate important information in short to medium-length texts; skim and scan for main ideas and details
      • Infer meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary by drawing on content knowledge and using contextual clues
      • Read and interpret charts, graphs, or maps
    • Writing
      • Write simple and compound sentences with appropriate punctuation and capitalization.
      • Use familiar vocabulary and basic text structure to write a single paragraph to convey an idea with supporting details and/or examples.
      • Make edits of grammar (simple verb tenses), spelling, and sentence structure
    • Speaking
      • Discuss and exchange opinions
      • Discuss personal/employment background
      • Use high-frequency vocabulary, knowledge of basic grammar, and sentence structure in familiar communicative tasks and short presentations
    • Listening
      • Understand and respond to conversations, explanations, instructions, and short narratives of a somewhat complex nature but related to familiar tasks and situations
      • Apply linguistic and background knowledge and strategies  (by taking notes and summarizing main points to understand the main intent and details communicated by speaker)


    Total Hours: 150 Lecture Hours: 150

  
  •  

    EASL 042 ESL Writing Fundamentals

    1-9 credits
    Teaches organization/other aspects of the writing process integrated with grammar, reading, and critical thinking skills.

    Prerequisites: EASL 030  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify paragraph parts and organize paragraphs effectively
    • Write extended paragraphs with the following methods of development: narration, description, process, cause/effect, contrast, and persuasion
    • Use pre-writing techniques and understand the basics of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, editing, and revising
    • Demonstrate familiarity with the most common spelling rules
    • Understand common prefixes, roots, and suffixes and use this knowledge to create new words and infer meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary
    • Identify and use correctly the main grammatical structures taught in EASL 030 and 040.
    • Skim, scan, predict, and understand patterns of organization within a text
    • Read timed readings and answer comprehension questions and/or summarize


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 90
  
  •  

    EASL 050 High Intermediate ESL

    1-15 credits


    Students will practice and improve communication skills to function effectively in various life situations and to explore program opportunities.

    Prerequisites: EASL 040  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     

    • Reading
      • Recognize unfamiliar and some specialized words by breaking words into parts and using contextual clues           
      • Monitor and enhance comprehension by recognizing key words and posing and answering questions 
      • Organize information using some strategies, such as recall, restatement, simple sequencing and simple categorization
    • Writing
      • Write a simple narrative, informative, or expressive paragraph
      • Use strategies to identify, brainstorm and organize ideas to support a single purpose such as to convey personal experience, meet a specific need or respond to recent learning
      • Make edits of grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage and text structure
    • Listening
      • Understand and respond appropriately to extended explanations and narratives, detailed instructions and complex conversations
      • Use a wide range of strategies effectively to repair gaps in understanding and give feedback
      • Apply linguistic, socio-cultural, and other background knowledge and strategies to understand the intent of the speaker
    • Speaking
      • Use basic grammar and a variety of sentence types in a range of somewhat unfamiliar or unpredictable communication tasks
      • Elaborate with some detail and examples and select the most important information to relay
      • Recall and use sufficient oral vocabulary related to personal experience and everyday activities, some idioms


    Total Hours: 150 Lecture Hours: 150

  
  •  

    EASL 053 Healthcare Bridge I

    6 credits


    This course is designed to assist ESL students in their transition into Allied Health Programs, by offering language instruction in the context of Health/ Healthcare.

    Prerequisites: Completion of level 4 or equivalent placement scores and interest in one of the Allied Health Programs at LWTech.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate familiarity with key A&P concepts (body makeup and systems, etc) and master basic vocabulary (in terms of spelling, pronunciation and word use) related to Health/Healthcare
    • Apply basic reading comprehension skills (skimming, scanning, and breaking down larger phrases) to authentic reading selections used in Allied Health Programs; read timed readings and answer comprehension questions and/or summarize
    • Identify the three basic component parts of a word and apply word building rules to infer meaning of basic health/medical terminology
    • Differentiate among verb tenses, use Passive Voice (basics tenses) correctly, form the plural of medical nouns, and use adjectives to compare
    • Write an extended paragraph with the following methods of development: narration, description, cause/effect, and process analysis
    • Use simple sentence combining techniques to write paragraphs/case studies
    • Set realistic goals, keep a reading log, and keep track of wpm, and improve test-taking skills
    • Identify class sequence and campus contact for desired program
    • Plan a visit of at least one hour to a relevant college class, interview the instructor and/or a student in the class, and prepare a report based on the interview and observation
    • Plan a project with a classmate to present to the class on topics of intercultural issues in healthcare (involves contact with native speakers)
    • Use a CD and a floppy disk, create and save a document, and use bars, buttons, and icons; become familiar with basic word-processing skills and improve typing speed; access relevant web pages

     

    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 60

  
  •  

    EASL 057 ESL Writing High/Intermediate

    3 credits
    This online class improves reading and writing skills through learning and practicing new grammar and writing topics. Assignments are based on online reading texts.

    Prerequisites: EASL 040  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the form, meaning, and use of different verb tenses, the passive voice, modal verbs, and gerunds and infinitives
    • Write clear sentences in paragraphs missing topic sentences, supporting sentences, and concluding sentences
    • Understand the meaning and use of different transitional words and phrases
    • Apply the new grammar knowledge in writing sentences and paragraphs correctly
    • Develop ideas into final paragraphs based on online readings


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    EASL 060 Connect With English

    1 credits
    In this independent-study course, students will practice listening and writing skills, and some basic grammatical structures to complement or prepare for regular ESL classes.

    Prerequisites: EASL 030  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Total Hours: 22 Lab or Clinical Hours: 22
  
  •  

    EASL 062 Writing Improvement

    1 credits
    This independent-study class is intended for intermediate ESL learners. Students will work on their writing at the sentence level and then at the paragraph level, while reviewing and practicing grammatical structures and relationships.

    Prerequisites: EASL 030  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Total Hours: 22 Lab or Clinical Hours: 22
  
  •  

    EASL 064 ESL Workskills

    1 credits
    This is an independent-study course designed to improve the language skills necessary to function well in an American workplace setting.

    Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in EASL 030  or EASL 040  or current employment.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    EASL 065 Advanced ESL

    1-15 credits


    In this course, students will continue improving communication skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing to prepare them for transitioning into college programs.

    Prerequisites: EASL 050  or equivalent placement.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     

    • Reading
      • Locate important information, read identified sections for detail and determine missing information
      • Monitor and enhance comprehension using skimming and scanning and question formation techniques
      • Organize and analyze information and reflect upon its meaning using classification, categorization and comparison/contrast
    • Writing
      • Write compound and complex sentences in one-two paragraph texts with few errors
      • Make revisions for clarity and organization and edits for grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and language usage
      • Use familiar and specialized vocabulary including abstract nouns and idioms
    • Listening
      • Understand main ideas in conversations, short lectures, and extended explanations
      • Ask questions for further understanding and to give feedback appropriate to the situation
      • Apply linguistic, socio-cultural, and other background knowledge and strategies to fully understand the intent of the speaker
    • Speaking
      • Use a variety of complex sentence structures in a range of unfamiliar, unpredictable and uncomfortable interactions
      • Employ appropriate strategies to select, organize and relay information
      • Recall and use vocabulary related to daily activities, school, work and social situations


    Total Hours: 150 Lecture Hours: 150

  
  •  

    EASL 085 ESL/ABE Learning Strategies

    6 credits
    This course contextualizes reading, writing, speaking, and listening with metacognitive and self-regulation skills. Upper-level ESL/ABE students build resilience and motivation to transition into college-level classes. The course addresses language learning styles and navigating the US academic culture. Students learn research-based techniques to reduce college and cultural-related anxiety and improve self-confidence in one’s abilities to succeed.

    Prerequisites: EASL 040  (or equivalent CASAS placement) and instructor permission

    Corequisites: EASL 050  or higher

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Compare and contrast learning styles as applicable to one’s language learning IQ
    • Identify and use strategies to balance reflective with impulsive language learning styles
    • Describe and employ techniques to balance right-brain with left-brain preferences
    • Identify the influence of one’s native language and English-specific self-confidence
    • Explain affective (emotions, mindsets, attitudes) influence on the learning process
    • Develop individualized plan for developing self-confidence and lowering anxiety
    • Explain and apply emotional self-regulation skills during tests and presentations
    • Compare and contrast US academic culture with one’s native academic culture
    • Demonstrate college and career readiness (CCR) skills aligned with the national CCR standards


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 60

Environmental Science

  
  •  

    ENVS 321 Environmental Health

    5 credits
    This course investigates the role of the environment in personal, community, and global health. This course investigates current environmental public health issues and topics in environmental health sciences as well as global health threats such as climate change, pollution, food supply issues, etc. This course includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Analyze the role that environmental policy and regulation has on mitigating health risks
    • Investigate major sources and types of environmental agents and the role they play in health outcomes
    • Identify and define the steps in the risk-assessment and risk-management processes
    • Define toxicology and identify issues surrounding human exposure to chemical toxicants
    • Examine the role of water and air in human health issues and outcomes
    • Identify the role of food safety and food quality on human health outcomes
    • Identify current issues and topics in environmental health
    • Compare peer-reviewed research with popular accounts of environmental health issues and concerns


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ENVS& 101 Introduction to Environmental Science

    5 credits
    Discusses the effects of human activity on changing ecosystems, energy flow, sustainability, pollution, and natural cycles. Content also deals with water and wastewater treatments, air pollution, and solid waste treatment and disposal technologies. Includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093 , MATH 090  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss the natural cycles of an ecosystem
    • Explain the natural flow of energy and associated ecosystems and their sustainability
    • Discuss changes to ecosystems due to human activity 
    • Identify common constituents of surface water, groundwater, and domestic wastewater
    • Apply concepts and principles of sustainable development as it relates to wastewater treatment, dissolved oxygen, and landfill space
    • Identify environmental issues that relate to different cultures and countries


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    STEC 351 Principles of Sustainability

    5 credits
    Introduces the influence of human activities on environmental processes. Topics include ecological concepts, population growth, natural resources, and current environmental problems from scientific, social, political, and economic perspectives. Students demonstrate an understanding of environmental interrelationships and contemporary global environmental issues as related to sustainable design practices.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BTAD Program and any college-level lab science

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Identify environmental issues in different cultures and countries
    • Analyze the impact of air and water pollution on the climate and on human beings, and evaluate measures to reduce pollution
    • Measure factors that affect environmental sustainability such as air and water quality
    • Interpret labels, MSDS and symbols common to hazardous materials/waste
    • Analyze the characteristics of populations, and assess environmental impacts of human population growth, including urbanization worldwide
    • Evaluate modern agricultural techniques, pesticide use, and their impact on food and water supply, and discuss water conservation methods
    • Analyze the impact of air and water pollution on the climate and human beings, and evaluate the role of sustainable design practices in mitigation
    • Explain the importance of energy consumption and the use of fossil fuels and waste management methods, and analyze their environmental impact
    • Examine the importance of local, national, and international policies that aim to protect the environment
    • Investigate current green practices implemented in graphic, industrial, and architectural design projects across the globe
    • Create a design project that integrates components of sustainability and environmental impact


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

First Aid/CPR

  
  •  

    IFAD 156 8-Hour First Aid/CPR

    0.5 credits
    Designed for people in office settings (e.g. banking, retail sales and computer operators) within 4-6 minutes of emergency health services. First Aid and CPR certification valid for two years. Text required, review prior to start. Course covers basic first aid and CPR instruction.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply skills of CPR/AED and First Aid
    • Course completion cards in CPR and FA meet Washington State Labor and Industries workplace safety requirement for 2 years
    • Prepare participants to respond correctly in emergency situations


  
  •  

    IFAD 158 CPR For the Healthcare Provider

    0.5 credits
    CPR certification meets AHA guidelines for healthcare providers. Course specifically designed for individuals in the medical or dental fields, and students in the college pre-professional programs. Text required, review prior to start of course.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • American Heart Association Provider CPR class completion cards are recognized by Washington State Labor and Industries in the work place for two years
    • Understand and apply skills of CPR
    • Prepare participants to respond correctly in emergency situations


    Total Hours: 4 Lecture Hours: 4
  
  •  

    IFAD 161 12-Hour First Aid/CPR/Daycare and Foster Care

    1 credits
    Meets Washington State Department of Social and Health Services requirements for day or foster care licensing; also recommended for adults who participate in activities involving children. Program includes accident safety and prevention, infant and child care, obstructed airway management and first aid. First aid certification valid for two years; CPR certification valid for two years. Review text prior to the start of class.

    Total Hours: 12 Lecture Hours: 12
  
  •  

    IFAD 162 First Aid/CPR for Health Care Providers

    1 credits
    Includes adult, child and infant skills in airway management and CPR; Bag Valve Mask Resuscitation practical exercises, AED awareness and familiarization, and first aid. First aid certification valid for two years; CPR certification meets AHA guidelines for healthcare providers; recommended renewal is one year. Course is designed for students in allied health programs. Review text prior to the start of class.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR and First Aid class completion cards are recognized by Washington State Labor and Industries in the workplace for 2 yrs
    • Prepare participants to respond correctly in emergency situations
    • Apply skills of CPR and First Aid


  
  •  

    IFAD 216 HIV/AIDS Training

    1 credits
    Overview of AIDS including concepts of immunity and related diseases. Meets Washington state seven-hour minimum requirement for healthcare workers. Participants will be given a certificate of training upon completion of course requirements.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • State the cause of AIDS
    • Describe the functioning of the normal immune system
    • State the diseases associated with AIDS
    • State current therapies for the syndrome
    • Inform patients on the importance of  AIDS education in the global prevention of AIDS
    • Describe risk factors associated with the disease


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10

Fitness Specialist/Personal Trainer

  
  •  

    FTNS 100 Independent Personal Fitness Training

    1


    Students will independently acquire the knowledge, skill, and ability to rationalize and apply integrated training progressions for safe and effective activities of daily living/wellness, recreation, fitness, or sport participation.

    This class is repeatable for credit.

    Integrated training incorporates all forms of training (flexibility, cardiorespiratory, core, balance, and resistance) as part of a progressive system designed for low to moderate intensity - group circuit training. Integrated independent personal fitness training optimizes functional performance while decreasing predispositions to acute and chronic injuries during the pursuit of wellness, recreation, or sport.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the knowledge, skill, and ability to rationalize and apply integrated training concepts
    • Differentiate between beginning, intermediate, and advanced progressions of flexibility, cardiorespiratory, core, balance, and resistance training
    • Demonstrate a documented physical transformation towards optimal functional performance
    • Demonstrate documented decreased predispositions to acute and chronic injuries


    Total Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
  •  

    FTNS 112 Principles of Sports and Exercise

    3 credits
    This course is an introduction to the discipline of exercise science. The class will examine all aspects associated with the personal training and exercise industry, and is an introduction to the fitness specialist program.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher)

    Corequisites: FTNS 121  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define exercise physiology and discuss the importance of the field
    • Describe and critically review the latest research in exercise physiology
    • Distinguish between exercise programs that are appropriate for attainment of health related fitness goals and programs designed to maximize performance
    • Describe the different principles and components of exercise
    • Explain the education and practical experiences required to become a fitness professional
    • Explain biological control systems, bioenergetics, exercise metabolism, and the basic effects of endurance and strength training on various organ systems


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    FTNS 118 Health Promotion and Wellness

    5 credits


    This course addresses strategies for improving the state of wellness through healthier lifestyles. Topics include: behavioral intervention, lifestyle changes, maintaining a healthy lifestyle, stress management, health-related fitness, and the implication for a fitness program design.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 112  and FTNS 121  

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe challenges to healthy lifestyles among different cultures
    • Describe the basic psychology associated with wellness and behavior change
    • Explain the negative effects of stress, pain, and depression
    • Explain the difference between exercise in pursuit of fitness or wellness
    • Develop an exercise program designed to improve health and wellness
    • Explain the need for and economics of worksite health promotion
    • As a committee member, organize and coordinate wellness events designed to reach business and industry employees


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

  
  •  

    FTNS 120 Responding to Emergencies

    3 credits
    The course provides fitness specialists with basic first aid, CPR skills, as well as knowledge to care for athletic injuries. All students will receive American Red Cross certifications upon successful completion.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Recognize and handle an emergency, check the scene for safety, and assess the state of the victim
    • Provide 1st responder care for life-threatening conditions or sudden illnesses
    • Recognize the signals of a heart attack and how to give care
    • Care for and prioritize injuries for various first aid situations


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    FTNS 121 Kinesiology

    5 credits
    A study of the structure and function of the skeletal and muscular systems of the human body, including origins, insertions, and actions of the muscles and an understanding the mechanical qualities of movement.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher)

    Corequisites: FTNS 112  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the bones involved in movement during exercise
    • Classify articulations based on structure and function
    • Describe the connective tissues associated with articulations and movement
    • Identify the muscles, including origins, insertions, and actions, involved in movement during exercise


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    FTNS 124 Functional Assessment and Corrective Exercise

    4 credits
    Students are introduced to techniques used to improve stabilization, endurance, and functional strength. In addition, students will design integrated programs to improve overall work capacity, enhance joint stabilization, and increase lean body mass.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 112  and FTNS 121  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Utilize innovative education tools and techniques from the National Academy of Sports Medicine to achieve optimal results for functional fitness
    • Apply scientific rationale, research, and the practical skills necessary to perform functional assessments, create individualized corrective exercise programs, and help clients progress to their goals
    • Explain the components and function of an integrated fitness assessment and how it relates to human movement/performance
    • Perform and instruct appropriate flexibility, core-training, and balance-training techniques  


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    FTNS 126 Sport and Exercise Psychology

    3 credits
    Course examines psychological theories and research related to sport and exercise behavior.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 112 .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe how psychological factors influence involvement and performance in sport, exercise, and physical education settings
    • Describe how participation in sport, exercise, and physical education influences the psychological makeup of the individuals involved
    • Describe the use of mental skills training to improve performance in the exercise setting


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    FTNS 128 Introduction to Athletic Training

    3 credits
    This is an introductory course for the personal trainer dealing with the recognition, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries related to sports and fitness. Topics include risk management, injury prevention, basic sports/exercise trauma, and management of emergency procedures.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 121 .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the role of the athletic trainer
    • Explain emergency procedures associated with sports injuries
    • Explain the mechanisms and characteristics of sports trauma
    • Describe tissue response to injury and therapeutic modalities utilized to assist in rehabilitation
    • Describe different sports/fitness injuries by region: foot, ankle, knee, thigh, hip, groin, pelvis, shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, spine, thorax, abdomen, and skin


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    FTNS 137 Professional Skills in Fitness

    5 credits
    This course examines the skills and behaviors necessary for success in the fitness industry. Topics include work habits, ethics, teamwork, communication, diversity, customer service, sales, and job preparation.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Communicate in a professional manner with clients during fitness sessions
    • Describe the education and practical experiences required to become a fitness professional
    • Describe the education-based approach to personal training
    • Provide professional customer service in the fitness industry
    • Effectively prepare for a job interview in the fitness industry
    • Utilize computer applications to professionally maintain client data 
    • Describe pertinent ethical issues in the fitness industry
    • Develop professional networks within the fitness industry


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    FTNS 142 Certification Review Lab

    2 credits
    This course offers preparation for certifications offered by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), the American Council on Exercise (ACE), and the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA).

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe safe and effective methods of exercise by applying the fundamental principles of exercise science
    • Write appropriate exercise prescriptions
    • Identify motivational techniques to assist  individuals with initiation and maintenance of healthy behaviors
    • Identify areas of risk and the necessary management of risk in the fitness industry
    • Identify errors in exercise performance and techniques


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    FTNS 144 Nutrition for Sports Performance

    3 credits
    This course examines nutrition in relation to athletic performance.

    Prerequisites: NUTR& 101 .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify energy sources for muscle metabolism
    • Describe the nutritional needs of athletes
    • Identify the nutritional concerns of female athletes
    • Identify dietary strategies designed to enhance performance
    • Evaluate the role of ergogenic aids in athletic performance


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    FTNS 152 Exercise Physiology

    5 credits
    This course focuses on alterations in body systems and organs during physical activity with an emphasis on energy producing systems. Students examine adaptations to the cardiorespiratory and muscular systems during exercise.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 112 , FTNS 121 , and BIOL& 160  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain acute responses and chronic adaptations to exercise by various body systems
    • Describe and critically review the latest research in exercise physiology pertaining to cardiovascular and muscular adaptations associated with exercise
    • Explain the processes underlying force generation by skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue
    • Explain the mechanisms of action of the cardiovascular system in oxygen and carbon dioxide transport at rest and during exercise
    • Explain the mechanism of action of the respiratory system for gas exchange at rest and during exercise
    • Explain the acid-base balance in the body during exercise
    • Explain the body’s response and adaptation to exercise under varying environmental conditions, e.g. heat stress, altitude, etc
    • Explain gender and chronological age differences in responses or adaptations to exercise
    • Explain the role of nutrition and body composition as it relates to exercise performance and health


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    FTNS 153 Clinical Fitness Assessment

    2 credits
    This course introduces students to clinical fitness testing. Students conduct a systematic assessment to obtain objective and subjective client information.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 152 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Effectively perform objective and subjective fitness assessments
    • Critically review literature to determine reliability and validity of testing measurements
    • Conduct a variety of exercise tests for the different components of fitness
    • Screen individuals according to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines
    • Utilize computer software to analyze data obtained during fitness testing


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    FTNS 154 Exercise Prescription for Special Populations

    5 credits
    Students are introduced to conditions, dysfunctions, and diseases common in special populations, such as arthritis, diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. Also covered are the effects of these conditions on clientele and training variables and how to alter program design for clients with these various conditions.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 152  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define conditions, dysfunctions and diseases common in special populations of fitness clients
    • Describe how these conditions affect the acute training variables within an exercise program
    • Screen individuals and stratify their risk according to the guidelines set by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)
    • Alter program design for clients with various conditions


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    FTNS 170 Group Exercise Instruction

    4 credits
    This class will provide the student with the fundamental knowledge and instructional techniques to lead group fitness classes. Components that make up an organized and safe class, such as proper technique, music cueing, and choreography are covered. Studio time for practical skill acquisition is included.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify critical components of designing a group exercise class
    • Describe the proper use of rhythm and music selection in a group exercise setting
    • Explain and utilize a variety of teaching techniques, styles and strategies
    • Explain and utilize specific techniques in the areas of goal setting, maintaining concentration, and relaxation
    • Create a variety of group exercise routines


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    FTNS 191 Fitness Internship I

    3 credits
    This course prepares the student to be an employee in a health, fitness, or recreational facility. Students observe certified industry professionals at health, fitness, recreational, or therapeutic facilities and learn the daily operational duties associated with a fitness center.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 112 , FTNS 121 BIOL& 160 , and instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the daily operational aspects of a fitness facility
    • Collaborate with fitness professionals and fellow employees to perform daily tasks in a fitness center
    • Explain and implement emergency procedures at a fitness center
    • List a variety of exercises used in designing exercise programs


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    FTNS 210 Fitness Internship II - Personal Training

    3 credits
    This course provides an opportunity for students to gain the skills necessary to become a personal trainer through 44 hours of supervised personal training in the LWIT Fitness Center.

    Prerequisites: FTNS 191  and CPR/First Aid Certification

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the knowledge, skills, and abilities required for entry level personal training
    • Design and implement safe and efficient exercise prescriptions for individual clients
    • Motivate, coach, and instruct clients to transform their functional capacity during activities of daily living and sport and recreation


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    FTNS 213 Exercise and Stress Management

    4 credits
    The focus of this class is to provide the student with the principles and methods relevant to understanding how chronic stress impacts the human body and the role stress plays in overall health and well-being. Students will gain an understanding of various means of stress reduction and relaxation methods commonly used to help individuals better manage stress. Various lifestyle changes that can be used to improve health outcomes and ways those can be applied in everyday life will also be discussed.

    Prerequisites: Minimum ABED 040  and ABED 046  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Examine the physiological response to stress.
    • Analyze the impact stress has on physical health.
    • Evaluate and apply techniques and strategies for stress management.
    • Evaluate the role of health behaviors on stress prevention and management.
    • Apply an understanding of the relationship that stress management plays in overall wellness.
    • Create client centered programs based on the relationship between exercise, nutrition, and stress.


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
  •  

    FTNS 214 Sport and American Culture

    4 credits
    This class will focus on issues that relate to sport and its influence on culture in the U.S. Students will examine how sport has become so prominent in American culture, how sport influences individual lives, and the role sport plays in society. This is an opportunity to gain a historical perspective while examining more closely the inter-relationship between sport and culture in present-day America, exploring historical and present-day issues from economic, social and cultural perspectives.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093   or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe how interest in sport affects individual choices  
    • Evaluate how interest in sport is affected by age, income, geography, gender, ethnicity, etc.
    • Analyze the role sport has played in shaping society
    • Explore the ability of sport to both bring groups together in a positive way and separate people in a negative way
    • Evaluate the reciprocal relationship between sport and American culture, both historically and in the present
    • Apply an understanding of sport and American culture as it relates to working with individuals and/or clients


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
  
  •  

    FTNS 215 Business and Risk Management in Fitness

    5 credits
    This course examines business practices, safety, liability, and negligence in the fitness industry.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and explain crucial business concepts, including purchasing, contractual agreements, risk management and negligence, technology issues, and other fiscal concerns as they relate to the fitness industry
    • Explain ethical business issues in the fitness industry
    • Define safety, liability, and negligence as they apply to the fitness industry
    • Explain legal aspects of personal training
    • Create a fitness business plan
    • Create a framework for creating risk management documents for a fitness program


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
  •  

    FTNS 216 Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Chronic Disease

    4 credits
    The focus of this class is to provide the student with the basic concepts surrounding the role nutrition and physical activity play in the prevention and maintenance of various chronic diseases. Basic physiological mechanisms of chronic disease states will be discussed in conjunction with the impact dietary and exercise behaviors either support or mitigate those physiological mechanisms. 

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 160 NUTR& 101 , and FTNS 152  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Analyze the physiological basis of various prevalent chronic diseases
    • Evaluate the impact and role of nutrition and exercise on chronic disease management and prevention
    • Explore the historical and evolutionary context of various chronic disease states
    • Evaluate the role lifestyle choices play in overall health and wellbeing


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 40
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10