Catalog 2017-2018 
    
    Dec 14, 2018  
Catalog 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Accounting

  
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    ACCT 105 Quickbooks

    3 credits
    QuickBooks is a popular accounting program designed for both business and personal use. Instruction includes how to create and use a variety of accounts and forms pertaining to customers, vendors, banks, inventory, check printing, reports and charts.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 111 , BTE 105 , BTE 120 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create, name, retrieve, and backup QuickBooks files
    • Manage lists such as customer and vendor lists
    • Pay bills and record collections
    • Reconcile bank statements
    • Create and update inventory, invoices, and customized forms
    • Produce reports and graphs
    • Research, compare and contrast the different options available for becoming certified in QuickBooks


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACCT 111 Introduction to Accounting I

    5 credits
    This is an introductory course emphasizing double entry bookkeeping for a sole proprietor. Students learn how to record business transactions, detect and correct errors, and prepare financial statements. A practice set provides the opportunity to maintain records for a business.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or equivalent placement score for ENGL 099  or higher) and ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate mastery in the language of accounting
    • Properly record business transactions for a sole proprietor
    • Prepare financial statements
    • Compile data for worksheets, adjusting, and closing.
    • Complete a practice set applying accounting principles learned
    • Participate in an accounting team to record financial transactions and report results of analysis


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ACCT 112 Business Calculator Applications

    3 credits
    Students learn to use the desktop calculator by touch with a proficiency in speed and accuracy. Students use the desktop calculator to solve a variety of business-related problems.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or equivalent placement score for MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Master the touch method when operating the desktop calculator
    • Build speed and accuracy to reach industry standards
    • Utilize special keys and functions to solve problems efficiently
    • Apply calculator knowledge to solve business problems


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACCT 121 Introduction to Accounting II

    5 credits


    Course covers basic accounting concepts, principles, and financial statement preparation for a sole proprietorship. The course emphasizes merchandising operations, special journals, payroll, and payroll taxes.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 111 MATH 087  (or equivalent placement scores for MATH 098  or higher), or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe and illustrate merchandising operations and the two types of inventory systems
    • Account for the purchase of inventory using a perpetual system
    • Account for the sale of inventory using a perpetual system
    • Adjust and close the accounts of a merchandising business
    • Prepare a merchandiser’s financial statements
    • Use inventory-related ratios to evaluate a business
    • Use the sales journal, the cash receipts journal, and the accounts receivable subsidiary ledger
    • Use the purchases journal, the cash payments journal, and the accounts payable subsidiary ledger
    • Calculate gross pay, employee payroll tax deductions for federal income tax withholding, state income tax withholding, FICA, and net pay
    • Calculate employer taxes for FICA, FUTA, SUTA, and workers’ compensation insurance
    • Prepare a payroll register
    • Maintain an employee earnings record
    • Record payroll and payroll taxes
    • Record employer taxes for FICA, FUTA, SUTA, and workers’ compensation
    • Record the payment of FUTA, SUTA, and workers’ compensation
    • Prepare Forms W-2, W-3, 941, and 940


  
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    ACCT 255 Income Tax I

    5 credits
    Introduction to federal income tax laws for individuals. Course covers gross income, deductions, and tax credits with emphasis on in-depth preparation of individual tax returns. This course also covers items related to sole proprietorship business income (schedule C).

    Prerequisites: ACCT 121 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the fundamental concepts of the federal income tax system as applied to individuals
    • Prepare individual income tax returns through the application of the concepts and tax laws learned in the course
    • Correctly calculate taxable income using the tax formula and an individual’s income tax data; and calculate amount owed or refund to be received
    • Discover and articulate facts relevant to the taxation of particular transactions or events
    • Discover the applicable tax rules relevant to proper tax treatment of a transaction or event


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ACCT 256 Income Tax II

    5 credits
    Beyond the basics of ACCT 255  individual income taxes. Course covers business expenses, cost recovery (tax depreciation), capital gains and losses, disposition of business assets, partnership taxation, and standard corporate income tax including subchapter S corporations. In addition the course will cover payroll and withholding tax procedures, general tax planning, and IRS procedures and penalties.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 255 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the basic concepts of the federal income tax system as applied to a business
    • Apply basic tax concepts to various business entities: partnerships, corporations, and S corporations
    • Identify the appropriate federal tax forms and supporting schedules, including: Sole proprietorship Schedule C, Partnership Form 1065, Corporation Form 1120, and S Corporation Form 1120S
    • Understand (more measurable) basic Washington state sales and payroll tax collection and reporting
    • Understand (more measurable) and reconcile the differences in accounting income and taxable income
    • Research and evaluate federal and state tax issues online


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ACCT 275 Ethics in Business

    5 credits


    This course introduces ethical decision making processes used in business. Through group interaction and case scenarios, students learn moral philosophies and social responsibilities as they pertain to working in business.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 111  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe ethical situations and use an ethical framework to make decisions
    • Recognize and classify different ethical issues
    • Apply social responsibility in the decision making processes
    • Apply ethical decisions within the context of an organizational structure
    • Use conflict as an opportunity to develop ethical decisions
    • Examine the ethical pitfalls, tragedies, and trends affecting business and the accounting profession
    • Examine the role and ethical expectations of the accounting profession
    • Determine and develop appropriate governance processes to prevent fraud
    • Compare and contrast the different ethical behaviors expected in different cultures and countries


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

  
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    ACCT 280 Accounting Projects

    3 credits
    A capstone simulation a student develops with the instructor to give the student more depth or breadth in application or theory in accounting.

    Prerequisites: Term V or Term VI accounting student or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Research and analyze work to answer accounting related questions while completing a realistic experience project


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACCT 301 Managerial Accounting

    5 credits
    This course will focus on accounting concepts and applications that will help managers identify, measure, analyze, and communicate information about their departments’ operations and profitability from a variety of aspects, thus helping managers make informed decisions about their departments.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASTLM program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the purpose of managerial accounting and its benefits.
    • Describe the operations of the company and how those operations are represented in the financial statements.
    • Analyze important cost related-concepts and the components, along with cost drivers, activities that directly trace resource costs to products, and opportunities to reduce costs.
    • Analyze how cost information supports important management activities.
    • Analyze and interpret variances between actual results and budgets, and explain how they relate to the operations of the company.
    • Explain how to measure customer profitability and assigning costs to customers.
    • Develop capital and operational budgets and forecasts.
    • Design reports to analyze if the company’s goals are being accomplished and to measure the efficiency of internal processes.
    • Analyze the strategic planning process and how that applies to the company’s operations and employees.


  
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    ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I

    5 credits
    The first course in the accounting transfer sequence. This course introduces basic principles, concepts, theories and procedures of recording, analyzing, and interpreting financial data.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087  and ENGL 093  (or placement into MATH 098  or higher and ENGL 099  or higher). ACCT 111  recommended.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the purpose and uses of financial accounting
    • Apply basic accounting principles and assumptions to business transactions
    • Employ double-entry bookkeeping to record and report on basic business operational transactions in an accounting system
    • Describe the impact of basic operating transactions on a business’s financial position
    • Critically analyze a business’s financial position and operational results
    • Discuss the origins of fraud and means by which a business may protect itself from it 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ACCT& 202 Principles of Accounting II

    5 credits


    The second course in the accounting transfer sequence. This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of accounting with application to sole proprietorship and corporate forms of business organization.

    Prerequisites: ACCT& 201  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the impact of basic investing and financing transactions on a business’s financial position
    • Employ double-entry bookkeeping to record and report on basic business investing and financing transactions in an accounting system
    • Construct a report of a business’s cash flows
    • Critically analyze a business’s financial position, cash flows, and operational results
    • Compute and evaluate financial ratios 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

  
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    ACCT& 203 Principles of Accounting III

    5 credits


    The third course in the accounting transfer sequence. Students learn presentation and interpretation of financial data for managerial use. Applications of accounting output to managerial control and planning are emphasized.

    Prerequisites: ACCT& 202  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Calculate and explain the costs and benefits of simple financial choices encountered in financial planning and strategic decision making
    • Describe how accounting is used to develop an information system for use by management in the process of making decisions
    • Define different types of costs and explain the flow of costs from the point of their incurrence to the sale of completed products
    • Describe the similarities and the differences between job-order and process costing, and develop schedules to report manufacturing costs to management
    • Describe the benefits and limitations of activity-based costing, and identify types of quality costs
    • Identify variable, fixed and mixed costs, and explain cost-volume-profit relationships
    • Define and describe the budgeting process, and prepare budgets for a manufacturer
    • Develop standard costing systems, and compute price and quantity variances for materials, labor and overhead costs
    • Perform short-term decision and capital investment analysis

     

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50


Adult Basic Education

  
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    ABED 010 ABE Orientation

    1 credits
    This course is for students who plan to enroll in the ABE program at Lake Washington Institute of Technology. Topics covered include LWIT campus resources, programs, and courses, and educational and professional goal-setting. CASAS placement test and WABERS demographic form, or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon the successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply knowledge gained of ABE and general education class sequence to plan quarterly schedule
    • Articulate principles of learning styles and identify preferred learning style(s)
    • Locate and use campus resources
    • Select and describe educational and professional goals
    • Navigate the LWTC website and register online for classes
    • List and describe LWTC certificate and degree options relevant to their interests


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10
  
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    ABED 024 Writing Fundamentals

    6 credits
    This course is exclusively for students with sufficient reading, listening, and speaking skills and developing writing skills. It is intended to prepare students for entry into the ABED 046  and developmental English sequence.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate CASAS and writing scores and instructor’s permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Use appropriate grammatical structures, spelling, and punctuation to write correct sentences ranging from simple to complex
    • Identify paragraph parts and organize paragraphs effectively
    • Employ different transitional words and phrases to produce paragraphs with different methods of development (narration, description, cause/effect, etc.)
    • Develop ideas into final paragraphs based on readings
    • Edit, revise, and proofread for errors in writing


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 60
  
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    ABED 030 Adult Basic Education Math I

    1-2 credits
    Students gain mastery of whole number concepts and methods through the use of the four basic mathematical operations (add, subtract, multiply, divide) in both numeric and story problems. Students also study numeral and word representations of numbers, and the US standard measurement system.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Write names for whole numbers
    • Identify the place value of digits within a numeral
    • Add, subtract, multiply and divide whole numbers
    • Add three or more numbers
    • Multiply by tens
    • Solve word problems requiring addition
    • Solve word problems requiring subtraction
    • Solve word problems requiring multiplication
    • Solve word problems requiring division
    • Measure using whole units
    • Use common measurements in the US standard measurement system
    • Use the mathematical critical thinking skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems in basic arithmetic


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    ABED 040 Adult Basic Education Math II

    5 credits
    This course covers fractions, decimals, percents, and ratios through the use of the four basic mathematical operations (add, subtract, multiply, divide) in both numeric and story problems. Content includes numeric, symbol, and word representations of numbers and the US measurement system.

    Prerequisites: ABED 030 , equivalent placement score, or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Write names for numbers
    • Identify the place value of digits within a numeral
    • Add, subtract, multiply, and divide fractions
    • Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals
    • Add three or more numbers
    • Multiply and divide by tens
    • Express division remainders in fractional and rounded decimal form
    • Solve word problems requiring addition
    • Solve word problems requiring subtraction
    • Solve word problems requiring multiplication
    • Solve word problems requiring division
    • Measure using fractions of units
    • Convert common measurements in the US measurement system
    • Read and interpret simple graphs
    • Solve word problems requiring ratios and proportions
    • Solve word problems requiring percentages
    • Use the mathematical critical thinking skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems in basic arithmetic


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ABED 043 GED® Math Review

    5 credits
    This course reviews math topics on the GED® exam. Both lecture and individualized work are offered.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate placement test score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon the successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply the standard order of operations to GED-level math problems
    • Compute with fractions, decimals and percents
    • Solve problems using ratio and proportions
    • Use appropriate measurement techniques to solve GED-level math problems
    • Decode math story problems
    • Apply mathematical skills in number sense, measurement, data analysis, probability and algebra to GED-level word problems
    • Draw logical inferences from graphs and charts in math story problems
    • Choose appropriate problem-solving strategies for a variety of GED-level math problems
    • Pass a GED math practice exam with a scaled score of 450 or higher


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ABED 045 Reading Improvement

    5 credits
    An introductory Adult Basic Education reading skills class where students will focus on the sentence, including basic sentence types, usage, and punctuation. Students will practice writing sentences that relate to the same topic, which will be used to lead the student into the development of paragraphs that are unified under a topic and a thesis sentence.

    Prerequisites: Equivalent placement score or instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Analyze what is required for effective reading in program choices
    • Use context clues and structural analysis
    • Use the dictionary
    • Use the elements of a textbook (graphics, index, contents)
    • Summarize main ideas
    • Analyze structure-organizational pattern and details
    • Draw inferences and make judgments
    • Demonstrate comprehension by answering written and oral questions
    • Identify preferred learning style
    • Organize time and materials
    • Practice speed reading


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ABED 046 Writing

    5 credits
    An introductory Adult Basic Education writing skills class where students will focus on the sentence, including basic sentence types, usage, and punctuation. Students will practice writing sentences that relate to the same topic, which will be used to lead the student into the development of paragraphs that are unified under a topic and a thesis sentence.

    Prerequisites: Equivalent placement score or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Write a variety of sentences, including statement, questions and commands
    • Expand simple sentences to reflect more complex ideas
    • Use correct subject-verb agreement, capitalization, and punctuation
    • Develop proofreading and editing skills
    • Compose a letter
    • Write a simple paragraph
    • Experience writing as a form of personal expression
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the use of a dictionary


    Total Hours: 80 Lecture Hours: 80
  
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    ABED 047 Job Skills Training

    1-15 credits
    Students strengthen worker readiness skills through learning modules, group discussion and reading. General content includes effective communication, motivation, time management, financial management, workplace values and worker portfolio development.

    Prerequisites: Placement in class is by WorkFirst staff.

    Total Hours: 165 Lecture Hours: 165
  
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    ABED 048 Self-paced GED®

    1-5 credits
    Set up an individual study plan to guide you through self-paced lessons; tutoring available when necessary.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Total Hours: 110 Lab or Clinical Hours: 110
  
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    ABED 049 Structured GED Preparation

    5 credits
    This class is designed to prepare students to take all five parts of the GED EXAM. This is a non-graded, continuous enrollment class. The class offers a combination of lecture and lab work.

    Prerequisites: Minimum CASAS Reading score and instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Synthesize information from reading passages in order to draw conclusions and make predictions in all content areas
    • Apply knowledge of mathematical concepts in the solution of problems
    • Recognize how different concepts and principles work in a variety of situations with content in math, social studies and science
    • Write a five paragraph GED essay at level 3 or higher as described by the GED essay matrix
    • Comprehend GED level reading assignments
    • Apply reading comprehension to social studies and science content
    • Apply mathematical skills in number sense, measurement, geometry, data analysis, probability and algebra to GED level real life word problems
    • Draw logical inferences from graphs and charts in math, social studies and science


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ABED 053 Healthcare Bridge

    1-6 credits
    This course provides a common basis of knowledge (basic anatomy and physiology and medical terminology) for all healthcare programs in order to increase students’ readiness for healthcare programs. Students will practice and improve language skills integrated with health/science content with equal attention dedicated to both.

    Prerequisites: EASL 040  or equivalent CASAS test placement.

    Corequisites: EASL 050 /EASL 065 , or ABED 045 /ABED 046 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate familiarity with key Anatomy and Physiology concepts and master essential vocabulary in terms of spelling, pronunciation, and word use
    • Apply knowledge of word parts (prefixes, roots, and suffixes) to understand and infer the meaning of medical terminology
    • Demonstrate improved reading speed and increased comprehension of healthcare-related readings
    • Identify and summarize main ideas in healthcare context readings
    • Apply reading strategies (such as scanning, skimming, and guessing meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary) to healthcare-related texts
    • Write paragraphs summarizing healthcare-related readings
    • Identify educational and career pathway for desired occupational goal
    • Navigate relevant websites, select and use information


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 60
  
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    ABED 054 Online Grammar & Writing For Advanced ESL

    2 credits
    This writing class delivered on-line builds grammar skills in areas(such as verb tenses and clauses) that remain a barrier to non-native English speakers’ success in ABED and ENGL 093  classes.

    Prerequisites: EASL 050  or equivalent placement.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the form, meaning, and use of articles
    • Use correctly of present perfect and past perfect tenses
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the subject-verb agreement rules
    • Use different types of clauses
    • Gain familiarity with the sequence of English department courses
    • Apply the new grammar knowledge correctly in writing sentences and short paragraphs


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 055 Online GED® Writing Preparation

    3 credits
    Builds skills related to successfully passing the LA: Writing portion of the GED® test. Students improve sentence skills (grammar, usage, and mechanics) and develop five-paragraph essays.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate placement test score or instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Write correct sentences ranging from simple to complex
    • Edit, revise, and proofread for errors in writing
    • Write essays that support a topic statement
    • Use process writing steps
    • Write a five paragraph essay in a variety of modes such as cause/effect, descriptive, narrative, compare/contrast


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 061 Basic Skills Welding Applications I

    3 credits
    This course is exclusively for students enrolled in the first term of the I-BEST Welding Introduction certificate program. It addresses specific vocabulary, reading, and language skills covered in the first term technical courses (WELD 102 and WELD 103).

    Corequisites: WELD 102  and WELD 103  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other words and phrases used in welding and manufacturing and accurately pronounce and use them
    • Respond to oral directions using vocabulary common in the field
    • Formulate clarifying questions in response to directions given orally
    • Outline safety procedures and demonstrate ability to understand and follow oral and written directives related to safety
    • Participate actively in structured conversations-as part of a whole class, in small groups, and with a partner-on topics related to welding and manufacturing


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 062 Basic Skills Welding Applications II

    3 credits
    This course is exclusively for students enrolled in the second term of the I-BEST Welding Introduction certificate program. It addresses specific vocabulary, reading, quantitative, and language skills covered in the second term technical courses (WELD 104 and WELD 106).

    Corequisites: WELD 104  and WELD 106  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss career plans, identify career pathways related to welding and advanced manufacturing, and demonstrate interviewing skills
    • Interpret words and phrases as they are used in texts, including texts on OSHA regulations, employee/employer rights and responsibilities, and employee benefits
    • Follow written directions
    • Compile concise, organized notes
    • Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) in response to class activities
    • Develop accurate and grammatically correct informative and explanatory texts in response to topics related to welding and manufacturing
    • Accurately use fractions and decimals in contexts typical of welding and manufacturing settings
    • Convert among standard measurement units within a given measurement system and use these conversions in solving problems that commonly arise on the shop floor
    • Identify properties of and relationships between geometric objects and apply them in contexts relevant to welding and manufacturing


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 063 Basic Skills Machining Applications I

    3 credits
    This course is exclusively for students enrolled in the first term of the I-BEST Intorduction to Manual and CNC Machining certificate program. It addresses specific vocabulary, reading, and language skills covered in the first term technical courses (MACH 105, MACH 106, MACH 111, MACH 141, and MACH 161).

    Corequisites: MACH 105 , MACH 106 , MACH 111 , MACH 141 , and MACH 161  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other words and phrases used in machining and machine tool anatomy and accurately pronounce and use them
    • Respond to oral directions using vocabulary common to machining language
    • Formulate clarifying questions in response to directions given orally
    • Outline safety procedures and demonstrate ability to understand and follow oral and written directives related to safety
    • Participate actively in structured conversations-as part of a whole class, in small groups, and with a partner-on topics related to welding and manufacturing


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 064 Basic Skills Machining Applications II

    3 credits
    This course is exclusively for students enrolled in the second term of the I-BEST Introduction to Manual and CNC Machining certificate program. It addresses specific vocabulary, reading, quantitative, and language skills covered in the second term technical courses (MACH 115, MACH 116, MACH 131, and MACH 133).

    Corequisites: MACH 115 , MACH 116 , MACH 131 , and MACH 133  

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss career plans, identify career pathways related to machining and advanced manufacturing, and demonstrate interviewing skills
    • Interpret words and phrases as they are used in texts, including texts on OSHA regulations, employee/employer rights and responsibilities, and employee benefits
    • Describe work culture and employee/supervisor interactions that commonly occur in manufacturing settings
    • Read training documentation accurately and follow the process steps provided on machine displays
    • Read and follow directions provided on setup sheets
    • Develop accurate and grammatically correct informative and explanatory texts in response to topics related to machining and manufacturing
    • Convert among standard measurement units within a given measurement system, with particular emphasis on decimal notation, and use these conversions in solving problems that commonly arise on the shop floor
    • Describe the Cartesian coordinate system, and use it in solving applied problems
    • Apply concepts of geometric transformation, including rotations, reflections, and combinations of these, in order to create and preserve distance, angle, and shape


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 066 Communication Skills Child Care Applications

    3 credits
    This course addresses industry specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the technical courses (ECED&105, ECED&107, ECED&120).

    Prerequisites: EASL 040  or placement by assessment (NRS ESL 5 or ABE 3).

    Corequisites: ECED& 105 , ECED& 107 , and ECED& 120 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Pronounce, spell, and use correctly specialized vocabulary relating to a child’s environment, behavior, and accepted learning theories
    • Explain the steps in active listening and discuss non-verbal communication techniques
    • Use a variety of complex sentence structures to analyze and explain the Professional Code of Ethics in the field of child care
    • Write related paragraphs to produce a manual for use in the child care setting
    • Communicate basic child development information to parents and peers


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 067 Communication Skills Medical Assisting Applications I

    3 credits
    This course is exclusively for students who qualify and enroll in the I-BEST Medical Assisting, Office Administration certificate program. It addresses industry specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the first term technical courses (MEDA 115, MEDA 116, and BTE 101).

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of EASL 050 or placement by assessment (NRS ESL 6 or ABE 4)

    Corequisites: MEDA 115 , MEDA 116 , and BTE 101  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Pronounce, spell, and use correctly specialized vocabulary relating to medical terminology
    • Demonstrate reading comprehension of topics relating to medical law and ethics
    • Write narrative/informative paragraphs employing vocabulary related to legal and ethical issues that arise in medical situations
    • Make edits of grammar, spelling, and sentence structure using Microsoft Word
    • Give and follow oral instructions for performing basic computer functions in Microsoft Windows, Excel, and Powerpoint


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 068 Communication Skills Medical Assisting Applications II

    3 credits
    This course is exclusively for students who are enrolled in the second term of the I-BEST Medical Assisting, Office Administration certificate program. It addresses specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the second term technical courses (BTE 105 and 112 and MEDA 121).

    Prerequisites: ABED 067  

    Corequisites: BTE 112  and MEDA 121  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Pronounce, spell, and use correctly specialized vocabulary relating to worksheets, accounts receivable/payable statements, billing procedures and record collections
    • Role-play telephone techniques necessary to function in a medical office
    • Produce common medical office written reports using a variety of sentence structures.
    • Read and interpret data from pie, column, bar, and 3-D charts
    • Transfer information from graphs and charts to written summaries


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 069 Communication Skills Medical Assisting Applications III

    3 credits
    This course is exclusively for students who are enrolled in the third term of the I-BEST Medical Assisting, Office Administration certificate program. It addresses specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the third term technical courses (MEDA 136 and MEDA 211).

    Prerequisites: ABED 068  

    Corequisites: MEDA 136  and MEDA 211  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Pronounce, spell, and use correctly specialized vocabulary relating to insurance terminology, terms, phrases and abbreviations
    • Explain the meaning of codes found in the CPT book and HCPCS manual
    • Read sample charts and match procedures to the correct code
    • Complete claim forms for a variety of providers using a medical insurance billing software
    • Demonstrate how to obtain managed care referrals and pre-certification approvals for patients


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 070 Communication Skills Computer Applications I

    1-3 credits
    Improve pronunciation, spelling, and meaning of vocabulary related to Windows, Word, and the Internet. Use Microsoft programs to write and edit sentences, paragraphs, and business letters. Become familiar with and improve keyboarding skills.

    Prerequisites: EASL 030  or placement by assessment (NRS ESL 4 or ABE 2).

    Corequisites: BTE 105 , BTE 111 , and BTE 120 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Pronounce, spell, and understand basic Windows, Word, keyboarding, and Internet terms
    • Identify and use the basic elements of the writing process and type paragraphs and a business letter using Word editing tools
    • Search for and read information on the Internet
    • Use the Internet to develop language resources


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 072 Communication Skills Computer Applications II

    1-3 credits
    Improve pronunciation, spelling, and meaning of vocabulary related to Excel, Outlook, and PowerPoint. Use computers to prepare paragraphs, emails, spreadsheets, and presentations. 

    Prerequisites: ABED 070 , BTE 105 , BTE 111 , and BTE 120 .

    Corequisites: BTE 112 , BTE 124 , and BTE 135 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Pronounce, spell, and understand Excel, Outlook,  and PowerPoint terms
    • Write and type paragraphs, spreadsheets, and emails.
    • Create a PowerPoint presentation
    • Create a group PowerPoint presentation


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 074 Communication Skills Transportation Applications I

    3 credits


    This course is exclusively for students who qualify and enroll in the I-BEST General Service Technician certificate of completion. It addresses industry specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the first term technical courses (TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 ).

    Prerequisites: Completion of EASL 030  or placement by assessment (NRS ESL 4 or ABE 2).

    Corequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 .

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Give and follow oral and written instructions to perform computer functions related to trade applications
    • Pronounce correctly and describe tools and pieces of automotive shop equipment
    • Explain safety and hazardous material laws
    • Use electrical terminology and define the laws and theories of electricity
    • Read and interpret industry-specific charts and diagrams
    • Use high-frequency vocabulary pertaining to welding and refrigeration techniques in the transportation industry
    • Write paragraphs describing the types of systems used on a variety of vehicles
    • Employ a variety of complex sentence structures needed to interact with co-workers

     

    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
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    ABED 076 Communication Skills Transportation Applications II

    3 credits
    This course is exclusively for students enrolled in the I-BEST General Service Technician certificate of completion. It addresses industry specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the second term technical courses (AUTO 120  and AUTO 124 ).

    Prerequisites: ABED 074 , TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 .

    Corequisites: AUTO 120  and AUTO 124 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Identify important information in industry-specific texts, and skim and scan for main ideas and details
    • Recall and use vocabulary related to electrical starting, charging, and lighting systems
    • Explain the steps to diagnose engine, electrical, and electronic problems
    • Interpret wiring diagrams from digital workshop resources
    • Spell accurately to fill out car care service form
    • Write 3-4 related paragraphs to give instructions on performing a complete maintenance and inspection service
    • Explain how to safely raise and support a vehicle
    • Employ speaking strategies to work with customers to accurately fill out repair orders


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 077 Communication Skills Accounting Applications I

    3 credits
    This course is exclusively for students who qualify and enroll in the I-BEST Accounting Assistant Certificate of Completion. It addresses industry specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the first term technical courses (ACCT 111 , ACCT 112 , and BTE 120 ).

    Prerequisites: EASL 040  or placement by assessment (NRS ESL 5 or ABE 3).

    Corequisites: ACCT 111 , ACCT 112 , and BTE 120 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Pronounce, spell, and use correctly specialized vocabulary relating to the language of accounting, business transactions, and financial statements
    • Make edits of grammar, spelling, and sentence structure using Microsoft Word
    • Write narrative/informative paragraphs employing vocabulary related to business problems
    • Give and follow oral instructions for performing computer functions in Microsoft Windows and Excel


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 078 Communication Skills Accounting Applications II

    3 credits
    This course is exclusively for students who are enrolled in the second term of the I-BEST Accounting Assistant Certificate of Completion. It addresses specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the second term technical courses (BTE 112  and ACCT 121 ).

    Prerequisites: ABED 077 , ACCT 111 , ACCT 112 , and BTE 120 .

    Corequisites: ACCT 121  and BTE 112 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Pronounce, spell, and use correctly specialized vocabulary relating to worksheets, financial and bank statements, bills and record collections
    • Write related paragraphs to produce reports
    • Use a variety of complex sentence structures to describe accounting principles and concepts
    • Interpret graphs and transfer information from written sources to graphs


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 079 Communication Skills Accounting Applications III

    3 credits
    This course is exclusively for students who are enrolled in the third term of the I-BEST Accounting Assistant Certificate of Completion. It addresses specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the third term technical courses (ACCT& 201  and ACCT 105 ) as well as employment skills.

    Prerequisites: ABED 078 , ACCT 121 , and BTE 112 .

    Corequisites: ACCT 105  and ACCT& 201 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Give and follow instructions for working with QuickBooks files
    • Use familiar and specialized vocabulary and information organization skills such as sequencing and categorization to write/update one’s resume
    • Use a variety of complex sentence structures to describe educational background and career goals
    • Apply linguistic knowledge and learned accounting principles to record business transactions and prepare income statements


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    ABED 080 ESL/ABED College Transition

    3-15 credits


    This course assists ESL/ABED student transition into technical and academic programs. It is comprised of six modules - Reading and Study Skills, College and Career Exploration, College Oral Communication, Grammar, Writing skills, and Digital Literacy. Students can take any module or combination of modules according to their need and skills.

    Prerequisites: EASL 050  or placement by assessment (NRS ESL 6 or ABE 4).

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    College Oral Communication (3 credits)

    • Self-identify and plan to address needs pertaining to fluency, vocabulary, and pronunciation in college communication
    • Recognize the influence of one’s native language and develop accent reduction strategies
    • Take information from short lectures and use it for other tasks such as tests and group discussions
    • Reword statements, ask for clarification, and apply appropriate strategies for helping others to understand him/her

    College and Career Exploration (3 credits)

    • Set realistic educational goals and demonstrate understanding of English and Math class sequence
    • Identify class sequence, prerequisites, and campus contact for desired technical program
    • Plan a visit of at least one hour to a relevant college class/desired technical program, interview the instructor and/or a student in the class, and prepare a report based on the interview and observation
    • Access campus resources such as the tutoring center, the writing center, the testing center, and the financial aid office

    Reading and Study Skills (3 credits)

    • Monitor and enhance reading speed by keeping a reading log
    • Apply reading comprehension skills (skimming, scanning, and breaking down larger phrases) to authentic college-level reading selections
    • Read timed readings and answer comprehension questions and/or summarize
    • Demonstrate knowledge of time management, organization, and test taking strategies.

    Grammar (3 credits)

    • Use grammar structures correctly in order to participate effectively in a variety of academic situations, including discussions/presentations, written assignments, student study groups, and office meetings with college instructors
    • Employ knowledge of word parts to guess the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary
    • Identify and improve English language skills and grammar structures as related to transitioning into developmental and college-level English classes

    Writing Skills (3 credits)

    • Create effective paragraphs/essays using the writing process
    • Exercise and apply basic critical thinking skills
    • Edit and revise college-level writing

    Digital Literacy (3 credits)

    • Explain the components of a computer, explore operating system basics, and effectively use a mouse and a keyboard
    • Connect to the Internet, browse Web pages, navigate Web sites, use search engines, and exchange e-mail with others
    • Demonstrate familiarity with fundamentals of word processing, spreadsheets, presentation software, and databases


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
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    ABED 082 Communication Skills Web Applications I

    3 credits
    This course is exclusively for ESL/ABE students who qualify and enroll in the I-BEST Web Maintenance Certificate of Completion. It addresses industry specific vocabulary and language skills covered in the ITAD and MMDP courses that are part of this certificate.

    Prerequisites: Completion of ABED 070  and instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Pronounce, spell, and use correctly specialized vocabulary relating to the language of web design and maintenance
    • Write related paragraphs to create a site proposal
    • Use a variety of complex sentence structures to describe current technologies in web-page design
    • Apply professional-technical  knowledge and linguistic strategies to assess a website’s usability and visual presentation
    • Give and follow oral instructions for creating basic web pages



Adult High School

  
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    ABED 050 Basic Skills for High School Equivalency

    5 credits
    This adult basic education class is for students pursuing an adult high school completion diploma. It contextualizes basic skills (reading, writing, and math) with science, history, and literature (content).

    Prerequisites: A minimum of 221 on the CASAS Reading Assessment, and a writing sample.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Construct and complete independent learning contracts
    • Determine most appropriate high school equivalency pathway and make college transition plans
    • Utilize a variety of writing strategies appropriate for college, personal, and work-related communication
    • Demonstrate effective reading strategies for understanding main idea, inference, and multiple vocabularies in discipline-specific content
    • Analyze contemporary/historical or civic issues from a variety of perspectives
    • Demonstrate knowledge of appropriate online learning platforms
    • Apply online research skills for a variety of content-related projects (history, science, etc.)


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 100
  
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    AHSE 051 Issues in Contemporary History and Civics

    5 credits
    This contextualized history course examines a contemporary history civics issue in depth. This course prepares the student to pass a high school equivalency examination and meet the history requirements of Washington State High School Diploma.

    Prerequisites: A minimum of 221 on the CASAS Reading Assessment, and a writing sample.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply the skills associated with reading as a historian: sourcing, contextualization, close reading, and corroboration
    • Investigate a contemporary/historical or civic issue using multiple reliable sources
    • Analyze a contemporary/historical civic issue from multiple perspectives
    • Discuss contextual influences and consequences related to the specific contemporary/historical civic issue
    • Connect the issue being researched to current social, economic, or professional circumstances
    • Present a well-organized logical argument, based on research, to support a position on a contemporary historical civic issue


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    AHSE 052 Special Topics in US History & Government

    5 credits
    This contextualized US history course prepares the student to meet the high school equivalency examination and satisfy the US History and Government requirement for the Washington State High School Diploma.

    Prerequisites: A minimum of 221 on the CASAS Reading Assessment, and a writing sample.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Organize a timeline of events leading to the development of the United States Government
    • Examine the functions of the three branches of federal government, and how they provide a system of checks and balances for the government as a whole
    • Discuss the significance of three specific Amendments included in the Bill of Rights
    • Analyze an American  historical issue using multiple reliable sources
    • Provide a thorough discussion of the impacts and implications of an historical issue from more than one perspective
    • Demonstrate the following skills of Reading like a Historian: sourcing, contextualization, close reading, and corroboration


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    AHSE 053 Special Topics in Washington State History

    5 credits
    Contextualized history course prepares students to pass a high school equivalency examination and satisfies the Washington History requirement for the Washington State High School Diploma. This course provides students the opportunity to examine a current state issue within a historical context.

    Prerequisites: A minimum of 221 on the CASAS Reading Assessment, and a writing sample.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the functions of the major branches of the Washington state government
    • Identify three significant components of the Washington State Constitution
    • Investigate a historical state event/issue using multiple reliable sources, and from multiple perspectives
    • Connect a historical event/issue to current issues being addressed in Washington State
    • Construct a presentation or graphic illustrating a current issue facing Washington State, including possible solutions or outcomes


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    AHSE 054 High School Equivalency Orientation and Portfolio

    3 credits


    This course is required of all students entering the HSE Exam /HS21+ Pathway, and those completing their HS21+ portfolio to submit for graduation.

    This course orients students to the HSE Exam/HS21+ Pathway, the college in general, the online platform, and to various programs and resources. Students complete learning assessments to identify potential barriers to completion and develop mitigation plans.  Students determine most appropriate high school equivalency pathway for their circumstances, then set goals and an academic plan to achieve them. Course provides instruction in navigation of the college website and online learning platform, as well as, study skills, persistence strategies, and traits of a successful student.  It also provides orientation to independent learning contracts and portfolio assessment to those students preparing to navigate the HS21+ Pathway.

    Prerequisites: A minimum of 226 on the CASAS Reading Assessment and a writing sample or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply concepts of effective learning strategies
    • Formulate an academic goal and a realistic plan to achieve it
    • Identify potential barriers to academic success and mitigation strategies
    • Investigate student academic and support resources available on campus
    • Construct and complete an Independent Learning Contract
    • Develop a portfolio for maintaining coursework and documents
    • Demonstrate knowledge of college website and online learning platform
    • Demonstrate emerging computer navigational online research skills


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30

  
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    AHSE 055 HS21 General Science - Lab

    5 credits
    This course provides a basic introduction to scientific inquiry as is conducted in formal and informal lab settings. Students will be exposed to investigations conducted across a range of scientific disciplines. This course includes a lab component that meets high school graduation requirements. 

    Prerequisites: Enrollment in basic skills and placement in HS21+-level classes as assessed by the CASAS.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Ask well-formulated questions that can be answered empirically
    • Effectively use various types of models to describe, represent and understand real-world systems
    • Plan and carry out investigations into scientific questions appropriate for the classroom
    • Analyze and interpret data
    • Use basic mathematics and computational tools in investigations
    • Construct appropriate explanations of scientific investigation, drawing conclusions based upon the evidence collected
    • Apply scientific knowledge in designing solutions to rudimentary engineering problems
    • Engage in scientific discussions, using appropriate terminology and supporting arguments with evidence
    • Obtain, evaluate, and communicate scientific information


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    AHSE 056 HS21 Integrated Math I

    5 credits
    HS21 Integrated Math I is a foundational math course that enables students to builds basic computational math skills using a variety of methods. Students recognize place value and written numerals, develop skills in addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and solve multi-step word problems.

    Prerequisites: Enrollment in basic skills and placement in HS21+ level classes as assessed by the CASAS.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Recognize the written names of numbers
    • Identify the place value of digits within a numeral
    • Accurately use computational vocabulary
    • Add, subtract, multiply, and divide three or more numbers
    • Add, subtract, multiply, and divide fractions
    • Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals
    • Express division remainders in fractional and rounded decimal form
    • Solve word problems requiring addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, ratios, proportions, and percentages
    • Measure using fractions of units
    • Convert common measurements in the US and metric measurement system
    • Read and interpret simple graphs
    • Use the mathematical critical thinking skills of problem solving, pattern recognition, substitution, following structural rules, and quantitative modeling to solve problems in basic arithmetic


    Total Hours: 50
  
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    AHSE 057 HS21 Surveys in Science

    5 credits
    Students will explore the nature of science and develop the ability to investigate the natural world from a scientific framework. They will pose questions requiring investigations and collect and analyze evidence. They will apply the scientific method as they investigate the concept of homeostasis within various scientific domains. Students will examine bias and the limitations of science.

    Prerequisites: Enrollment in basic skills and placement in HS21+ level classes as assessed by the CASAS.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course, student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the knowledge of the scientific method
    • Discuss the principle of homeostasis within the context of multiple scientific domains
    • Describe ways that scientific ideas have influenced society or the development of cultures
    • List questions that scientists investigate that are stimulated by the needs of society
    • Research a societal issue that may be addressed through science
    • Compare alternative solutions by considering trade-offs and possible consequences
    • Analyze scientific information in current events to make personal choices or understand public policy decisions
    • Demonstrate collaborative skills, specifically adoption of appropriate group roles, decision-making, and problem solving in small groups


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    AHSE 058 HS21 Studies in Health and Physical Education

    5-10 credits
    This course provides students the opportunity to explore issues within the field of health and physical education. Students will examine broad concepts within the field and will select a specific topic or project on which to focus, such as nutrition, exercise, children’s health, or career exploration in the health field. Broad concepts presented include critical reading in the field, the importance of nutrition and exercise on health and development, wellness versus prevention, public health issues.

    Prerequisites: Enrollment in basic skills and placement in HS21+ level classes as assessed by the CASAS.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the importance of personal health to both the individual and society
    • Evaluate information scientifically and assess the reliability of the information
    • Evaluate health information in the context of his/her own life
    • Analyze nutritional and environmental factors affecting individual wellness
    • Complete an individual in-depth research project or application of a health concept
    • Evaluate health risks associated with certain occupational, residential, and recreational choices
    • Document two healthy lifestyle changes made during this course and critique the strategies used in making each change
    • Compile evidence through a reflective assessment process which documents academic growth and increased proficiency in the content area


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    AHSE 059 Reading and Writing in Occupational Education

    5 credits
    This course provides students the opportunity to research a career field within the context of their needs and interests. Students will determine their projected living wage, complete career interest surveys, research a career specific field, including training requirements, the projected hiring, salary, and advancement data. Based on this research, students will conduct a cost-benefit analysis of two schools that provide the necessary education and training, in order to make an informed choice. Students will create a career action plan, and explore two funding opportunities, such as public and private scholarships.

    Prerequisites: Enrollment in basic skills and placement in HS21+ level classes as assessed by the CASAS.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Determine and complete a projected living wage assessment
    • Gather and analyze data to determine career interest and fit
    • Gather current and projected data on a specific career
    • Determine training and education needs
    • Conduct a cost-benefit analysis of two schools that provide necessary education/training
    • Identify two scholarship resources
    • Create a career action plan
    • Synthesize the data into a summary report


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    AHSE 060 HS21 Studies in Fine Arts

    5 credits
    This course provides students the opportunity to explore the fine arts including visual and performing arts. Students will demonstrate knowledge and appreciation of visual and performing arts.

    Prerequisites: A CASAS Reading score of 226 or higher and acceptance into the HS21 program

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss art and artists from at least two time periods, regions, or genres
    • Recognize and identify various art types
    • Analyze how art reflects changing times, traditions, resources, and cultural uses
    • Evaluate design, shape, color, composition, and medium
    • Create two artistic presentations or art projects that explore the arts from the current historical era
    • Discuss how visual and audio media can be an important expression of the issues, attitudes, and ideas that have developed throughout history
    • Publish or exhibit to the public a piece of personally created art


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    AHSE 061 HS21 Electives - Career and College Planning

    5 credits
    Students will have the opportunity to examine their values, interests, strengths and characteristics within the context of career planning. They will learn to recognize doubt and develop strategies to overcome potential barriers to success. They will complete a thorough career research project, determine what kind of training and education they need, and select two schools to examine for possible admission application. They will also have the opportunity to learn about the college financial aid options and application process.

    Prerequisites: Enrollment in basic skills and placement in HS21+ level classes as assessed by the CASAS.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Conduct a personal inventory identifying their values, interests, strengths, and characteristics
    • Define self-doubt and identify its influence in decision-making related to career and college planning
    • Identify both common and personal barriers that prevent students from completing a college degree or certification program
    • Apply strategies to overcome barriers that may prevent them from completing college
    • Complete a thorough career research project that will demonstrate knowledge of the work, future employment and salary projections, necessary training and education, and relative fit with the student’s values and personal characteristics
    • Research the program options, costs, and admission requirements of two colleges that provide the training and education required for their chosen career path
    • Create a master college application and essay
    • Describe their college financial aid options, the FAFSA and its purpose, and application process, and identify two possible scholarship sources


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    AHSE 062 HS21 Electives - Information Technology

    5 credits
    Students will have the opportunity to generate ideas and create original works for personal and group expression using a variety of digital tools. They will demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Students may use technology within various content areas to collaborate, communicate, generate innovative ideas, and investigate and solve problems.

    Prerequisites: Enrollment in basic skills and placement in HS21+ level classes as assessed by the CASAS.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interact and collaborate with others using a variety of digital tools
    • Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats
    • Research, manage, and evaluate information and solve problems using digital tools and resources
    • Report information and analyze and display data in a variety of ways to support conclusions
    • Combine technologies to create and share products from different content areas
    • Explore possible topics and available information on current issues using databases and digital resources to organize a project or solve a problem
    • Create digital products for inclusion in portfolios


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
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    AHSE 065 English Composition and Literature

    5 credits
    Students will increase their confidence and ability in writing and reading for academic purposes, employment, and everyday life. Course content emphasizes the mechanics of writing as well as strategies to develop and organize complex ideas in writing. Course readings focus on interpreting and analyzing a variety of texts, including fiction, nonfiction, and informational. This course is designed to prepare students for a successful transition to college-level courses and to develop the behaviors and values relevant to success in higher education and the labor market. Successful completion of this course will earn High School 21+ credit in English.

    Prerequisites: A minimum of 221 on the CASAS Reading Assessment and a writing sample

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Organize and analyze information and reflect upon its meaning in order to draw sound conclusions.
    • Assess how authors structure text and deploy vocabulary for specific writing purposes and audiences, and apply these strategies to their own writing.
    • Analyze the ways in which purpose and audience shape the construction of a text.
    • Write effective sentences, utilizing writing mechanics and writing conventions
    • Deploy strategies to plan, organize, and structure complex ideas to produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    • Appropriately moderate vocabulary (including idiom, colloquialisms and cultural references), sentence structure, voice, tone, rhetorical forms, and style for a variety of audiences and purposes.
    • Critically and reflexively evaluate writing and deploy strategies for revising.
    • Use computer technology and learning management systems to access new information, produce written work, and access and submit course materials.
    • Interpret and analyze nonfiction, fiction, and informational text


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    AHSE 066 HS21 Integrated Math II

    5 credits
    HS21 Integrated Math II builds upon the basic computational math skills developed in HS21 Integrated Math I using a variety of methods.  Students compute with fractions, decimals, and percents, as well as ratios and proportions. Emphasis is placed on problem solving strategies and order of operations for multi-step equations. Skill development is demonstrated through contextualized word problems.

    Prerequisites: Enrollment in basic skills and placement in HS21+ level classes as assessed by the CASAS.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon the successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply the standard order of operations to high school level math problems
    • Compute with fractions, decimals, and percents
    • Solve problems using ratio and proportions
    • Use appropriate measurement techniques to solve contextualized math problems
    • Decode math story problems
    • Apply mathematical skills in number sense, measurement, data analysis, probability and algebra to high school level word problems
    • Draw logical inferences from graphs and charts in math story problems
    • Choose appropriate problem-solving strategies for a variety of multi-step math problems


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    AHSE 068 HS21 Physical Education

    3 credits
    Through a combination of seminar instruction and independent training, students will acquire the knowledge, skill, and ability to apply integrated training progressions for safe and effective activities of daily living/wellness, recreation, fitness, or sport participation. This class is repeatable for credit.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the knowledge, skill, and ability to rationalize and apply integrated training concepts
    • Differentiate between beginning, intermediate, and advanced progressions of flexibility, cardiorespiratory, core, balance, and resistance training
    • Demonstrate a documented physical transformation towards optimal functional performance
    • Demonstrate documented decreased predispositions to acute and chronic injuries


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

American Sign Language

  
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    ASL& 121 American Sign Language I

    5 credits
    The student will learn the basic manual alphabet, vocabulary, numbers and phrases used in everyday communication, while developing an understanding and appreciation of Deaf Culture.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will:

    • Compose and construct sentences using ASL grammatical structure
    • Articulate pattern phrases in both receptive and expressive communication
    • Use basic vocabulary to ask and respond to questions using ASL
    • Implement a variety of strategies when communicating with the Deaf
    • Demonstrate cultural competence through the exploration of deaf history, deaf culture, community
    • Effectively use ASL signs, vocabulary and finger spelling in meaningful daily conversation


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ASL& 122 American Sign Language II

    5 credits
    The student will build on skills developed in ASL& 121 . The focus is on more advanced vocabulary, and more conversational dialogues.

    Prerequisites: ASL& 121 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate improvement in existing skills, and express concepts correctly and understandably in American Sign Language
    • Demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of core vocabulary appropriate for ASL II
    • Explain how sign movements can be modified to change meaning; how and when facial expressions occur; and how body, head, and eye movements are used in phrasing and agreement
    • Use vocabulary to discuss locating things around the house, complaining, making suggestions and requests, exchanging personal information and life events, describing and identifying things, and talking about the weekend
    • Participate in simple conversations on topics beyond the most immediate needs, e.g. giving directions, describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations in depth, attributing qualities to others, talking about routines
    • Identify, explain, and illustrate the various concepts, rules, and functions of ASL


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Applied Design

  
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    APDZ 310 Introduction to Applied Design

    5 credits
    A survey course of concepts and issues in applied design. Design terminology will be reviewed and contemporary design-related concepts such as human factors, interaction design, usability, and heuristics will be examined.

    Prerequisites: Admission to BTAD program or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Accurately use design terminology
    • Explain the design process
    • Identify principles and issues which cross design disciplines
    • Evaluate their design/technical/academic skills and identify areas for improvement
    • Use  resources effectively (library, learning management system, e-portfolio tools)
    • Describe their personal design aesthetic
    • Communicate  in-depth, credible knowledge of a subject or issue specific to their discipline 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    APDZ 311 Design Theory I

    5 credits
    This course provides a survey of the field of design from historical, cultural, and multi-disciplinary perspectives. The shifting definition of design and its influence on and by society provides a unifying theme.

    Prerequisites: APDZ 310  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define the shared fundamentals of design between visual/graphic art, architecture, furniture, fashion, engineering, product, craft, cultural expression and landscape design
    • Translate the elements and principles of design from initial definitions found in 2D visual design through the various design disciplines
    • Demonstrate understanding of Gestalt, usability, and interaction design
    • Compare and contrast the application of design through several global cultures and time periods, including Early 20th Century, Cold War Era and Contemporary Design
    • Identify historical changes in temporal design through interactive media
    • Explore diverse cultural contributions to design
    • Evaluate methods of seeing/interacting and the quality of the viewer/participant experience
    • Correlate contemporary design trends with cultural diversity


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    APDZ 312 Design Theory II

    5 credits
    This course provides a survey of the field of industrial design from historical, cultural, and multi-disciplinary perspectives. Students will explore theories underlying industrial design, assess products for usability, and examine design processes, including ideation, need finding, process documentation, project definition, scheduling, and team member roles.

    Prerequisites: APDZ 311  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define design process and problem identification
    • Translate a concept through different ideation techniques and effective expression
    • Follow  a design process document that defines the steps needed to develop a product specific to their field
    • Create  a project definition by breaking  a product or system down into its components and tasks
    • Develop  a basic product development schedule that includes major milestones, timelines, and department responsibilities
    • Correlate contemporary design trends with cultural diversity


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    APDZ 331 Design Creative Processes

    5 credits
    The unique role of the manager who is responsible for creation and design is examined. Particular attention is paid to the skills needed to lead a team of creative professionals.

    Prerequisites: APDZ 310  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    APDZ 332 Design and Productivity

    5 credits
    A practical study of how design innovations lead to new opportunities. Issues of copyright, patent, license, marketing, securing capital and freelancing will be discussed. Students will create a business plan for an entrepreneurial design venture.

    Prerequisites: APDZ 311  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    APDZ 333 Applied Design Technology

    5 credits
    Course designed for BTAD students to learn a new or updated technology software taught in a lower-division course while working directly with an upper-division faculty advisor to ensure lower-division technology outcomes and upper-division communication, problem solving and project design outcomes are met.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BTAD Program.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Operate new or updated design software
    • Develop an independent project showcasing design skills
    • Solve design related problems
    • Assess how new/updated software complements or supplements other design software/hardware
    • Demonstrate how newly acquired design skills enhance marketability
    • Predict current and future applications for the specific design software technologies


  
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    APDZ 334 Applied Design Theory

    5 credits
    Course designed for BTAD student to learn or enhance a skill, technique or theoretical understanding taught in a lower-division course while working directly with an upper-division faculty advisor to ensure lower-division course skills outcomes and upper-division, critical thinking, analytical and project design outcomes are met.

    Prerequisites: Admission to BTAD Program and instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Develop an independent project showcasing design skills
    • Solve design related problems demonstrating critical thinking skills
    • Assess how new skills complement or supplement existing design skills
    • Demonstrate and present how newly acquired design skills enhance marketability
    • Predict current and future applications for the new skill


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    APDZ 381 Theory of Interactivity

    5 credits
    This course provides a survey of the field of interaction design from historical, cultural and industry practice perspectives. Students will study the basics of human perception, explore the rules that govern interaction design, and examine principles of human-computer interaction.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BTAD Program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe a broad theoretical range of interaction design disciplines
    • Describe the basic principles of human factors that guide interaction design
    • Critically evaluate design work in software and interactive media
    • Demonstrate a broad understanding of the tools and methods used in interaction design
    • Employ creative and critical thinking to enhance problem solving 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    APDZ 382 Brand Communication and Marketing

    5 credits
    This course provides a survey of the field of brand communication design and marketing from historical, cultural and industry practice perspectives. Students will study the principles of brand communication and contemporary marketing theory.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BTAD Program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the basic process of brand development and value alignment
    • Demonstrate familiarity with contemporary marketing principles
    • Identify effective marketing and communication strategies for a business
    • Describe the implications of technology and global influence on communication
    • Describe the historical relevance and evolution of marketing communication
    • Produce a brand identity and concept delivery document
    • Employ creative and critical thinking to enhance problem solving


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    APDZ 383 Digital Design Fabrication and Prototyping

    5 credits
    This course provides a survey of the field of design fabrication and prototyping from the perspective of design, materials, and industry practices. Students will be guided through a lab environment using rapid prototyping devices and physical modeling techniques. Theoretical underpinnings will suggest how the “machine” is becoming more integrated into the design process.

    Prerequisites: ENGT 131  or GAME 124  (or CAD equivalent) and admission to the BTAD Program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate familiarity with contemporary fabrication/prototyping techniques
    • Critically evaluate design work from a fabrication/ prototyping perspective
    • Demonstrate a broad understanding of the tools, software, and equipment used in digital fabrication and prototyping
    • Implement methods of digital fabrication and physical prototyping into designs
    • Employ creative and critical thinking to enhance problem solving
    • Produce a portfolio artifact or research paper that synthesizes techniques taught in this course


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    APDZ 385 Environmental Graphic Design

    5 credits
    This course provides a survey of the field of environmental graphic design from historical, cultural and industry practice perspectives. Students will study the principles and practices of way finding, entertainment retail, exhibit design, and infographics.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BTAD Program or instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the basic components of way finding and signage systems
    • Demonstrate familiarity with contemporary exhibit design principles
    • Identify effective strategies for a way finding system
    • Describe the implications of technology and global influence on interactive communication and the visualization of information
    • Describe the historical relevance and evolution of entertainment retail
    • Produce a comprehensive portfolio artifact and process document
    • Employ creative and critical thinking to enhance problem solving


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    APDZ 386 Space, Color, and Light in Design Form Making

    5 credits
    This course provides a survey of how color and light affect form and the perception of space. Students will explore aspects of color theory, learn principles of 2D/3D/4D design, and understand how to manipulate light and shadows. Studies of how 2D graphics translate into 3D spaces will be explored. The dynamics of space and how it effects time and motion will also be covered.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BTAD program or instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the principles and differences between 2, 3 and 4 dimensional design formats
    • Demonstrate familiarity with contemporary technologies for virtual representation
    • Identify effective strategies for translating physical form into virtual form and vice versa
    • Describe the historical relevance and evolution of material and form making in the built industry
    • Produce a comprehensive portfolio artifact and process document
    • Employ creative and critical thinking to enhance problem solving


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    APDZ 441 Place Making and Sustainable Design

    5 credits
    Examines essential strategies and methods for creating place and sustainable design concepts within the built industry disciplines. Students apply design thinking methodology principles including human centered design and activity centered design to develop plans, apply project concepts, demonstrate presentation skills, and produce design project artifacts specific to the built industry fields.

    Prerequisites: APDZ 312  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe place making and sustainable design concept development as applied to the built industry
    • Identify and discuss the unique nature of sustainable design across various design disciplines
    • Create simple project proposals including projecting possible form, constructability, use case scenarios, and long term outcomes
    • Describe constructability and feasibility as applied to a project proposal
    • Present project proposals, plans, and progress reports
    • Produce a professional quality presentation that articulates a comprehensive design proposal
    • Produce a professional quality portfolio artifact


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    APDZ 451 Design Team Practicum

    5 credits


    Under the direction of their instructor, students will work in teams to perform design tasks in partnership with real-world design projects. Some on-site work at a partner organization may be required.

    Prerequisites: APDZ 441  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Participate in a team and demonstrate productive team collaboration
    • Demonstrate an ability to take direction and produce innovative results
    • Apply creative process and concept development to real-world problems
    • Perform effectively to real-world project plans
    • Apply current technology to produce real-world design vehicles
    • Apply best practice design processes to real-world problems
    • Produce marketable and professional level portfolio work


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

  
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    APDZ 461 Senior Capstone Project

    5 credits
    Students will complete a culminating project integrating all of their coursework and resulting in an employment portfolio piece that involves all steps in the design process from ideation to proof of concept, showcasing their abilities.

    Prerequisites: APDZ 451  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate mastery in some and familiarity with many tools, techniques, and technologies associated with design and its applications in the workplace
    • Express a personal design aesthetic that informs and enriches a student’s future contributions to the field
    • Employ creative and critical thinking to enhance problem solving
    • Produce a comprehensive and industry-ready design project including: discovery, concept development, iteration and design, and proof of concept


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    APDZ 497 Design Practice Internship

    1-5 credits
    Professional practice design internship designed to expand student learning in the workplace. Students work with a faculty member and internship site supervisor to formalize the academic component of the experience through development of learning objectives, professional projects, timesheets, work samples and written reviews.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BTAD Program and instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply techniques, concepts and best practices from the classroom to real-world circumstances
    • Clarify personal career goals, and identify skills that need improving to achieve these goals
    • Self-assess strengths and weaknesses in workplace competencies, such as interpersonal skills, communication skills and roles within an organizational structure
    • Self-assess for skill gaps in technical and design abilities as they apply in the workplace
    • Utilize constructive criticism as an opportunity to improve technical and conceptual abilities in a work environment
    • Produce marketable and professional level portfolio samples



Architectural Technology

  
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    ARCH 101 Architectural Fundamentals

    4 credits
    This course covers architectural fundamentals including: terminology, media, line conventions, architectural lettering, scaling, sketching, design principles, floor plans, sections, elevations, and dimensioning techniques. An introduction to building codes, construction documents, print reading, and interpretation. Emphasis is placed on architectural standards and conventions. 

    Prerequisites: CADE 101 , CADE 102 , CADE 103 , and CADE 104  

    Corequisites: ARCH 105 , CADE 131 , and CADE 132  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and explain architectural graphics symbols and conventions
    • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of building codes
    • Design basic plans for an architectural project
    • Illustrate sections and details for construction documents
    • Review architectural blueprints and identify common construction components


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ARCH 102 Construction Technologies

    4 credits
    This course covers residential and commercial construction methods, techniques, terminology, materials, codes, and permits. The study of wood framing systems, foundation systems, stair design, and roof systems. Includes various concrete construction building systems, and steel frame building systems are investigated and presented.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 101 , ARCH 105 , CADE 131 , and CADE 132  

    Corequisites: ARCH 107  and ARCH 131  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and explain framing systems, foundation systems, and roof systems
    • Research common construction systems of commercial buildings
    • Define terminology as it relates to building construction
    • Identify construction materials commonly used in building construction
    • Participate in a team to research and present on commercial building systems
    • Design stair system


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ARCH 105 Theory of Architecture

    4 credits
    This course investigates and studies architectural theories of importance. Lecture and research assignments will expand awareness of architectural values and principles, including influential theorists and theories throughout history.

    Prerequisites: CADE 101 , CADE 102 , CADE 103 , and CADE 104  

    Corequisites: ARCH 101 , CADE 131 , and CADE 132  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful  completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of varied architectural design, values, and principles through researching architectural theorists such as Vitruvius, Palladio, Le Corbusier, and Gropius
    • Analyze and evaluate architectural theories
    • Create and deliver presentation of an architectural theory


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ARCH 107 History of American Architecture

    4 credits
    History of architecture in America from the 17th century colonial beginnings through the 20th century. Topics of study include: European influence, vernacular styles, architectural terminology, and an introduction to the architects who influenced design and construction in America.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 101 , ARCH 105 , CADE 131 , and CADE 132  

    Corequisites: ARCH 102  and ARCH 131  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify American architectural styles and influential architects
    • Examine European architectural influences as they relate to American architecture
    • Research and recognize different architectural characteristics and styles
    • Analyze building characteristics and define the architectural styles 


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ARCH 131 Revit Architecture I

    4 credits
    This is a basic course in Autodesk Revit Architecture. Students will learn how to produce an instructor directed architectural project utilizing basic Revit operations such as walls, roofs, annotations, and dimensions. Revit is an architectural program and uses architectural elements and terminology.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 101 , ARCH 105 , CADE 131 , and CADE 132  

    Corequisites: ARCH 102  and ARCH 107  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply basic Revit operations such as model creation, documentation, and publishing by creating an architectural project
    • Manage the Revit interface and model controls using datum, parameters, and architectural elements
    • Setup and manage a new Revit project of a small commercial facility
    • Apply industry standards to produce a building model and to produce documentation
    • Create and modify basic Revit objects like walls, floors, doors, and roofs
    • Utilize the Revit annotation system to access the model intelligence and produce documentation that directly relates to the model


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ARCH 132 Revit Architecture II

    4 credits
    This is a continuation course in Revit Architecture. Students will focus on the model building process and create more advanced architectural models. To accomplish this, students will use: massing, file linking, site tools, rendering, custom content, and other trades like lighting and HVAC. Students will use other tools to review and verify information in their model with a focus on constructability, design, and sustainability.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 102 , ARCH 107 , ARCH 131 , and ARCH 134  

    Corequisites: ARCH 200  and ARCH 202  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create a comprehensive architectural building model using Revit fundamentals
    • Utilize Revit massing tools to assist with building design
    • Link and coordinate multiple Revit files
    • Create site, HVAC, and lighting in their Revit project
    • Utilize Revit to visualize and render the project
    • Review and coordinate their model using Revit and Navisworks


  
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    ARCH 134 Building Systems

    4 credits
    This course introduces electrical and mechanical systems for buildings including: building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems, heat transfer concepts, water supply, drainage, and electrical and lighting systems.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 101 , ARCH 105 , CADE 131 , and CADE 132  

    Corequisites: ARCH 102 , ARCH 107 , and ARCH 131  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the basic concepts of building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems, heat transfer, water supply, drainage, and power and lighting systems
    • Solve simple electrical and mechanical design problems
    • Interpret electrical and mechanical drawings used in building design


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ARCH 200 Design Studio - Residential

    4 credits
    This course covers residential design beginning at the conceptual stage through the design development phase of a project. Students will work in teams to simulate a client/architect relationship. Programming, analysis of site, and context are explored and conducted. Ongoing critique is an integral part of the project-based learning process. Design drawings of a residential project are produced utilizing common architectural graphic media techniques and presented.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 102 , ARCH 107 , and ARCH 131  

    Corequisites: ARCH 202  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Conceptualize and program a residential project
    • Conduct context and site analysis
    • Produce sketches during the design process
    • Collaborate with clients in a professional manner
    • Produce a design drawing set of a residential building project


  
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    ARCH 202 Construction Documents - Residential

    4 credits
    This course covers residential architectural graphics standards, codes, floor plans, sections, elevations, stairs, roofs, and foundations.  Primary focus is on developing and refining production of construction documents. Various architectural graphics media and software applications are utilized.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 102 , ARCH 107 , and ARCH 131  

    Corequisites: ARCH 200  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply prior knowledge of residential systems into detailed construction drawings
    • Develop design drawings into construction drawings
    • Apply knowledge and skills to create computer-generated drawings of construction documents for a residential building project


  
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    ARCH 210 Design Studio - Commercial

    4 credits


    This course covers commercial design beginning at the conceptual stage through the design development phase of a project. Programming and analysis of site and context are explored and conducted. Ongoing critique is an integral part of the project-based learning process. Design drawings of a commercial project are produced utilizing common architectural graphic media techniques.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 131  

    Corequisites: ARCH 212  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Conceptualize, design, and program a commercial project
    • Select and analyze a project site
    • Produce sketches during the design process
    • Develop design drawings of a commercial building project


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

  
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    ARCH 212 Construction Documents - Commercial

    4 credits
    This course covers commercial architectural graphics standards, codes, floor plans, sections, elevations, stairs, roofs, and foundations.  Primary focus is on production of construction documents. Various architectural graphics media and software applications are utilized.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 200  and ARCH 202  

    Corequisites: ARCH 210 

    Quarters Offered: Cohort 1: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply prior knowledge of commercial building systems to construction drawings
    • Develop design drawings for the construction document phase of a project
    • Apply knowledge and skills to create computer-generated drawings of construction documents for a commercial architectural building project


  
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    ARCH 215 Sustainability in Architecture

    4 credits
    This course introduces students to concepts of sustainability in the field of architecture. Students will utilize digital tools and technology with select design projects which will become the vehicle to analyze, evaluate, and articulate new ideas for a more sustainable architectural design.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 132 , ARCH 200 , and ARCH 202  

    Corequisites: ARCH 210  and ARCH 212  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain a variety of sustainability concepts
    • Utilize digital tools and software to analyze and define alternative solutions
    • Employ creative and critical thinking skills to solve sustainable challenges
    • Present project


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ARCH 220 Design Studio - Capstone Project

    7 credits
    Students define, program, design, and develop an architectural project while coordinating with faculty. The architectural project begins at a conceptual stage and will develop through the design phase of a project. Students work individually or on a team, explore and document the process of their work through sketches, study models, and design and present their drawings. Students have the ability to collaborate with civil and/or mechanical students.   

    Prerequisites: ARCH 210 , ARCH 212 , and ARCH 215  

    Corequisites: CADE 202  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define architectural project
    • Research related architectural project
    • Produce preliminary architectural sketches and drawings
    • Develop project schedule timeline
    • Perform advanced design process
    • Document design process and its components for their portfolio


  
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    ARCH 225 Construction Management - Architecture

    4 credits
    This course covers construction units of measure, estimating techniques, methods of preparing construction estimates, and management of a construction project. Office practices and construction scheduling are covered.

    Prerequisites: MATH& 142  and ARCH 102  or instructor permission

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply estimating techniques to complete cost estimates
    • Identify appropriate construction materials
    • Calculate construction quantities required for a project
    • Define common architectural terminology
    • Design a small building structure
    • Develop a construction timeline for a project


  
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    ARCH 228 Construction Specifications

    4 credits
    This course is a study of the construction contract process, methods, materials, contractual relationships, specifications, construction document organization, and the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) - Masterformat 2004.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 200  and ARCH 202  or instructor permission

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate adherence to industry standards through the construction contract process of a project
    • Interpret methods, materials, contractual relationships, and construction document organization
    • Perform independent research of the different systems for organizing specifications


  
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    ARCH 241 Architectural Visualization

    3 credits
    This course covers architectural illustration techniques and includes: orthographic, axonometric, and oblique projection and one and two point perspectives. Presentation and rendering techniques with emphasis on a variety of media, manual sketching, and digital presentation methods.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 131  or instructor permission

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Develop presentation drawings of architectural projects
    • Present drawings that are portfolio ready
    • Post-process digital drawings in photo editing software
    • Demonstrate clarity and organization in presentation drawing sequences


  
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    ARCH 245 Architectural Model Building

    4 credits
    This is a basic course in architectural model making. Emphasis is placed on current model making techniques and technologies utilized by architectural and engineering firms for marketing their professional services and proposals.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 200  and ARCH 202  or instructor permission

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate familiarity with contemporary fabrication/prototyping techniques
    • Create an architectural model utilizing skills acquired in previous architecture classes
    • Develop model making techniques through the production of a model project
    • Employ creative and critical thinking to enhance problem solving
    • Present model to group of peers



Art

  
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    ART 101 Introduction to Studio Art

    5 credits
    This course provides an overview of the history of art and introduces students to beginning studio art techniques. Students learn how fine art disciplines have enriched culture and how these skills are contemporarily applied. Students will apply what they learn through the creation of unique artwork.

    Prerequisites: ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher) and ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher)

    Program Outcomes:
     



    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

    • Describe historical artistic styles and schools
    • Compare how art impacts diverse cultures
    • Discern how art has contributed to societal, cultural, and personal expression
    • Explore contemporary applications for the visual arts
    • Practice the beginning fundamentals of drawing, painting, photography, and printmaking
    • Analyze and interpret visual images


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ART 102 Design I

    5 credits
    This course covers exploration of the two-dimensional design process including problem identification, creative ideation, and design solutions. Students will engage in critical dialogue exploring the content and context of design solutions. The principles and elements of design and the Gestalt principles will be examined and students will create design solutions based on them.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Incorporate and identify the principles of 2D design (balance, unity, emphasis, rhythm, etc.,) and examine how they are used in various design solutions
    • Incorporate and identify the elements of 2D design (line, shape, value, color, texture, etc.,) and examine how they apply to design solutions
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of value, color schemes, and color attributes through class assignments and projects
    • Differentiate between subtractive and additive color systems and understand how they are used in the design field
    • Identify Gestalt principles and how they apply to the design
    • Effectively present and defend individual design project during critique sessions
    • Explain the design process including problem identification, the creative brief, creating iterations and identifying multiple solutions, presenting concepts, layouts, and providing deliverables.
    • Describe how historical design movements continue to impact contemporary design work
    • Demonstrate an understanding of positive/negative space and the brain’s ability to interpret and complete shapes


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ART 111 Beginning Painting for Non Art Majors

    5 credits
    Introduces students to traditional and contemporary concepts and techniques in oil/acrylic painting. Students learn to organize form, color, and tone while practicing various methods of application, color mixing, and surface preparation.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Duplicate a master-painter’s landscape
    • Compose a landscape with atmospheric perspective
    • Transfer drawn images onto canvas
    • Blend unique hues through the mixture of primary, secondary and neutral colors/tones
    • Construct tonal under-painting with glazed/scumbled hues to create a still life painting
    • Explore painted composition through rapid sketches
    • Assess a variety of painting styles and schools
    • Complete a proposed final project in a chosen artistic style


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ART 112 Intermediate Painting for Non Art Majors

    5 credits
    Students further the skills taught in ART 111  and investigate painting as a means for self-expression. Explores advanced compositions and use of various materials.

    Prerequisites: ART 111 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Execute a series of paintings around a theme
    • Compose an image with atmospheric perspective
    • Blend unique hues through the mixture of primary, secondary, and neutral colors/tones
    • Explore painted composition through rapid sketches
    • Assess a variety of painting styles and schools
    • Demonstrate an applied knowledge of painting and craftsmanship techniques
    • Paint on a variety of materials with mixed methods


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ART 113 Advanced Painting for Non Art Majors

    5 credits
    Provides advanced instruction in painting using objectives taught in ART 112 . Students demonstrate advanced compositional theories and painting methods.

    Prerequisites: ART 112 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Execute a series of paintings around a theme
    • Blend unique hues through the mixture of primary, secondary, and neutral colors/tones
    • Explore painted composition through rapid sketches
    • Differentiate a variety of painting styles and schools
    • Demonstrate an applied knowledge of painting and craftsmanship techniques
    • Paint on a variety of materials with mixed methods
    • Present and defend completed work publically


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ART 121 Introduction to Drawing

    5 credits
    In-depth study of basic drawing skills, sketching principles, and visual communication through the drawn object and imagination. Composition, black and white media, subject matter and drawing genres will be examined in both representational and non-representational projects and exercises.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Discuss the elements of shape, line, texture, form, and light during class critiques and presentations
    • Apply terminology, tools, and techniques used in representational drawing
    • Demonstrate proportion, scale, and perspective
    • Transfer three dimensional objects onto two dimensional surface using black and white media
    • Use a sketchbook for drawing practice, recording ideas, and sketching
    • Draw compositions with a variety of line qualities
    • Render drawings using tonal contrast
    • Communicate ideas through drawing
    • Research historical and theoretical applications of drawings as planning,  process, and communication


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    ART 124 Introduction to Printmaking

    5 credits
    This course explores the fundamentals of repeatable print media, including relief, monotype, monoprint, intaglio (dry and wet techniques) and stencil printing. Students create repeatable matrix and edition prints.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Transfer images to a matrix
    • Produce printing matrices for relief, intaglio, and stencil printing
    • Execute printed editions in a variety of printmaking media
    • Paint and print monotype prints
    • Properly operate an etching printing press
    • Print images using hand-printing methods


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
 

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