Catalog 2017-2018 
    
    Jan 21, 2021  
Catalog 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Art

  
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    ART 140 Photography Appreciation

    5 credits
    This course explores the foundations and practical applications of the photographic medium. Course objectives primarily focus on students’ recognition of photography movements, genres and terminology, and exploration of concept and meaning through creation of a themed image or images. Foundations of shooting, editing, and evaluating digital photographs will tie historical and theoretical content to the contemporary photography process and exercise visual literacy. Required materials include a digital camera that can be connected to a computer to upload images.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the historical timeline and significant impacts of the photographic medium
    • Identify, compare and contrast major photographic genres and particular works from history
    • Describe the importance of photography as an intercultural language and art making tool
    • Develop a foundational understanding of the terminology and tools involved in a contemporary digital photography workflow
    • Produce well-exposed single images, and series of multiple images, using a digital camera
    • Articulate visual literacy by critiquing a photograph or series of photographs
    • Research and compile a personal synthesis of photo viewing and photo creation experience based on a specific topic, genre, or theme


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ART 201 Survey of Western Art - Ancient

    5 credits
    Major achievements in painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts in Europe, the Near East, and North Africa, from prehistoric times to the beginnings of Christianity. This course also offers some preliminary training in visual analysis and a practical introduction to the critical vocabulary of art history.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Recognize works of art from major world art traditions from pre-history through the Middle Ages, including the title, culture, period, and artist (if known)
    • Appreciate the social, cultural, historical, political, and economic factors which impact artists’ choices in subject, symbolism, and style across time and space
    • Investigate issues of gender, race, patronage, etc. as they relate to the role of the artist and the art works
    • Evaluate and analyze works of art, both in terms of visual analysis (line, color, composition, etc.) and in their expressive content, their subject matter


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ART 202 Survey of Western Art - Medieval & Renaissance

    5 credits
    This course examines the arts of the Byzantine Empire, Islam, and Western Christendom through 1520 AD. This course traces the artistic creativity of the people who lived during the Early Christian, Medieval and Renaissance periods of history, that is, from about 1 AD to about 1540.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Recognize works of art from major world art traditions during the Early Christian, Medieval and Renaissance periods, including the title, culture, period, and artist (if known)
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the three factors that affect period work: tradition, current style, and local style
    • Recognize works of art from major world art traditions during the Early Christian, Medieval and Renaissance periods, including the title, culture, period, and artist (if known)
    • Appreciate the social, cultural, historical, political, and economic factors which impact artists’ choices in subject, symbolism, and style across time and space
    • Investigate issues of gender, race, patronage, etc. as they relate to the role of the artist and the art works
    • Evaluate and analyze works of art, both in terms of visual analysis (line, color, composition, etc.) and in their expressive content, their subject matter


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    ART 203 Intermediate Drawing

    5 credits
    This course builds on existing skills and terminology learned in Intro to Drawing. Advanced approaches to composition, color media, subject matter and drawing genres will be examined in both representational and non-representational projects and exercises.

    Prerequisites: ART 121 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Produce drawings that demonstrate a solid understanding of value and color in drawing through use of both black-and-white and color drawing media
    • Produce drawings that utilize the two-dimensional space of the picture plane effectively and creatively by use of proportion, scale, perspective and compositional structure
    • Draw confidently from life, from 2D images, from memory, or imagination
    • Record ideas in a sketchbook to explore subject matter and new techniques
    • Apply representational and non-representational drawing approaches to projects and exercises
    • Describe the significance of drawing as a medium of creative expression and visual communication
    • Demonstrate creativity and problem solving abilities through individual projects


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ART 205 Human Life Drawing

    5 credits
    This advanced drawing class focuses on the human form as a basis for learning about composition, anatomy (including skeletal and muscular structure), and movement. Students will exit the class with the ability to draw the human form accurately in proportions, gesture, balance, structure, foreshortening, and surface anatomy.

    Prerequisites: ART 121  or instructor permission. This class draws from the nude human form.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify bone structures and surface muscle in the human form
    • Use important anatomical reference points to establish proportion
    • Execute gesture drawings
    • Sketch schematic and planar-analysis drawings
    • Apply form and cast shadows with differentiation of soft/hard edges
    • Draw the human form through a range of motion
    • Contextualize Figure Formalist and Figure Humanist artworks in their respective traditions


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ART 235 Figure Drawing Research

    5 credits
    This course is a continuation of the advanced drawing course ART 205 Human Life Drawing . Students will expand their knowledge of anatomy and conduct research outside of the studio. Students will exit this class with an ability to draw the human form accurately and identify major skeletal and muscular landmarks.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BTAD or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify bone structures and surface muscle in the human form
    • Use important anatomical reference points to establish proportion
    • Research internal musculature and skeletal structures, movement, and dynamics
    • Draw complex human figures in foreshortened poses
    • Identify current trends in the expressive nature of the human figure
    • Experiment with non-traditional materials and techniques


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ART 252 Design II

    5 credits
    This course is designed to build on the learning from ART 102 Design I . Exercises are intended to stimulate imagination, expand capacity for critical thinking and problem solving, explore conceptual development, and foster an understanding of the creative process. Students will review the elements and principles of design and incorporate them into their chosen medium. Class projects will help build student portfolios.

    Prerequisites: ART 102  and DSGN 126  or MMDP 219 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the process and decision-making involved in designing for a target audience
    • Combine design iteration with feedback to facilitate effective messaging
    • Demonstrate a mastery of design elements and principles by thoughtful integration into projects
    • Identify and implement best practices relevant to their course of study
    • Create portfolio content that showcases strong technical skill and concept development
    • Respectfully present, defend, and critique design decisions to an audience of peers


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ART 255 Beginning Painting for Art Majors

    5 credits
    Covers theory as well as practice and encourages originality and creativity. Furthers student understanding of the methods, materials, and ideas that are central to the practice of painting still lifes, figures, and landscapes.

    Prerequisites:  ART 121 , ART 113 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Duplicate a master-painter’s landscape
    • Compose a landscape with atmospheric perspective
    • Transfer drawn images onto canvas with emphasis on preliminary drawing
    • Blend unique hues through the mixture of primary, secondary, and neutral colors/tones.
    • Construct tonal under-painting with glazed/scumbled hues to create a still life painting
    • Layout compositions with an emphasis on drawing and design fundamentals
    • Explore painted composition through rapid sketches
    • Expand drawing skills through paint media
    • Assess a variety of painting styles and schools
    • Finish a proposed final project in a chosen artistic style


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ART 256 Intermediate Painting for Art Majors

    5 credits
    Students continue to develop their skills in painting by focusing on advanced composition theories and abstract concepts. Explores value, pattern, tone, mood, and color theories to stretch and refine abilities.

    Prerequisites: ART 111  or ART 255 

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Execute a series of paintings around a theme
    • Compose an image with atmospheric perspective
    • Transfer drawn images onto canvas with emphasis on preliminary drawing
    • Blend unique hues through the mixture of primary, secondary, and neutral colors/tones
    • Explore painted composition through rapid sketches
    • Layout compositions with an emphasis on drawing and design fundamentals
    • Assess a variety of painting styles and schools
    • Demonstrate an applied knowledge of painting and craftsmanship techniques
    • Paint on a variety of materials with mixed methods


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ART 257 Advanced Painting for Art Majors

    5 credits
    Explores traditional and contemporary approaches to theory and practice of painting. Emphasizes evoking emotional responses through effects of light, color, and abstraction. Students produce a series of paintings and further explore materials and subject matter.

    Prerequisites: ART 256 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Execute a series of paintings around a theme
    • Transfer drawn images onto canvas with emphasis on preliminary drawing
    • Blend unique hues through the mixture of primary, secondary, and neutral colors/tones
    • Layout compositions with an emphasis on drawing and design fundamentals
    • Explore painted composition through rapid sketches
    • Distinguish between a diversity of painting styles and schools
    • Demonstrate an applied knowledge of painting and craftsmanship techniques
    • Paint on a variety of materials with mixed methods
    • Present and defend completed work publically


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ART 305 Figural Form-making and Hand Drawn Technique

    5 credits


    This advanced drawing class focuses on the human form as a basis for learning about composition, anatomy (including skeletal and muscular structure), and movement. Students will exit the class with the ability to draw the human form accurately in proportions, gesture, balance, structure, foreshortening, and surface anatomy. Students will conduct a thorough research project and present/teach the material to the class.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BTAD Program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify bone structures and surface muscle in the human form
    • Use important anatomical reference points to establish proportion
    • Execute gesture drawings
    • Render complex three-dimensional form on the two-dimensional surface
    • Sketch schematic and planar-analysis drawings
    • Apply form and cast shadows with differentiation of soft/hard edges
    • Draw the human form through a range of motion
    • Emphasize iteration through developmental sketchbook drawings
    • Express abstract concepts through the human figure
    • Research a topic related to anatomy or figure drawing and present/teach the material to the class

     

    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    ART 324 Printmaking for Designers

    5 credits
    This course explores relief, monotype, monoprint, intaglio (dry and wet techniques), and stencil printmaking. Additional media are introduced for historical background. Students research the historical evolution of print graphic arts and forge connections between traditional print media and modern commercial print design.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BTAD program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Transfer images to a matrix
    • Execute highly consistent printed editions in a variety of printmaking media
    • Paint and print monotype prints
    • Use the elements and principles of design to produce relief, intaglio, and stencil prints
    • Properly operate an etching printing press
    • Translate a student-designed font into relief printmaking
    • Print images using hand-printing methods
    • Describe historical connections between contemporary print/web technology and traditional printmaking technologies


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    ART& 100 Art Appreciation

    5 credits
    Art Appreciation is an introduction to the diverse foundations of visual art. Course objectives primarily focus on students’ recognition of and conversation about the basic concepts, styles, techniques, terminology and principles of visual art and art history.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify major art movements and styles, from around the world
    • Recognize significant works of art, from antiquity to contemporary creations
    • Write personal synthesis of reading, lecture, class participation, and viewing experiences
    • Research and take an educated subjective position on a specific work of art
    • Discuss major works of art from traditional through contemporary
    • Develop a visual vocabulary to enrich a foundation of art appreciation, other cultures, and other time periods
    • Articulate the link between art, visual literacy, and contemporary visual approaches, i.e. advertising, propaganda, and self-expression
    • Compare artistic developments across different continents and cultures, during diverse timelines


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

Auto Body Technician

  
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    ACRT 125 Refinishing Products, Tools & Equipment

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the products, tools, and equipment used in refinishing and gives the student hands-on practice with each.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 126 , ACRT 225 , and ACRT 226 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the different types of spray equipment
    • Use, adjust, clean, maintain, and troubleshoot spray equipment
    • Identify the different types of primers, sealers, basecoats, clears, and other paint materials used
    • Use a spray booth and prep booth
    • Determine appropriate supplies to use in refinishing including tapes, sandpapers, masking papers, cleaning solvents, and others
    • Use other common types of paint equipment and hand tools
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    ACRT 126 Surface Preparation, Masking & Detailing

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the procedures necessary to prepare surfaces for paint, mask off areas not painted, and perform professional final detailing.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 125 , ACRT 225 , and ACRT 226 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • Evaluate surface conditions
    • Remove and feather existing paint
    • Prepare bare metal for paint
    • Prepare adjacent panels for blending
    • Final sand surfaces
    • Clean surfaces
    • Color sand new paint
    • Buff and polish surfaces
    • Use various masking supplies & techniques
    • Clean, detail, and care for new finishes
    • Use other common types of paint shop equipment, hand tools & supplies
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACRT 135 Door & Glass Service

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge, and tool skills needed to properly service and repair doors, stationary, and moveable glass.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 136 , ACRT 235 , ACRT 236 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Dismantle and reassemble doors
    • Install and adjust doors
    • Remove and replace door glass
    • Remove and replace windshields
    • Remove and replace back windows and other stationary glass


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACRT 136 Measuring & Realignment Procedures

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the use of measuring and frame straightening equipment to properly straighten unibody and frame vehicles.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 135 , ACRT 235 , and ACRT 236 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Interpret body dimension information and locate key reference points on a vehicle, using online body dimension manual and electronic measuring program
    • Explain the importance of datum line plane, body zero line plane, and centerline plane
    • Use measuring gauges
    • Explain the major differences between body-over-frame and unibody vehicle design
    • Indentify types of vehicle damage including diamond, side-sway, sag, mash, and twist
    • Identify and operate various types of straightening equipment
    • Plan and execute a pulling sequence
    • Set up straightening equipment
    • Rack and anchor a vehicle
    • Use other common types of shop equipment and hand tools
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACRT 145 Metal Panel Repair

    4 credits
    This intensively hands on course focuses on assessing metal panel damage and teaches numerous metal straightening techniques.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 146 , ACRT 245 , ACRT 246 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify different types of metals and understand their differences
    • Analyze sheet metal damage
    • Rough straighten metal
    • Final straighten metal
    • Use different hammer and dolly techniques
    • Straighten dents with spoons
    • Shrink and stretch metal and perform other stress relieving techniques
    • Use a spot weld dent puller and weld on pin dent puller
    • Perform basic paintless dent repair techniques
    • Use other common types of equipment, hand tools, and supplies
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    ACRT 146 Body Fillers and Applications

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge, and tool skills needed to apply various types of body fillers.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and understand the differences between body fillers
    • Mix body fillers and hardeners appropriately
    • Apply body fillers
    • Grate and sand body fillers
    • Feather edge fillers and existing paint
    • Maintain and recreate body contour lines
    • Repair minor imperfections
    • Repair rust damage


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACRT 155 Vehicle Construction Technology

    4 credits
    This course reviews how both body over frame and unibody vehicles are constructed and how to obtain service information, specifications and measurements.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 156 , ACRT 255 , ACRT 256 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify a vehicle
    • Identify major body sections
    • Identify body classifications
    • Identify panels on a vehicle
    • Identify direct damage to a vehicle
    • Identify basic unibody structures
    • Identify full frame designs
    • Explain crash testing done to a vehicle
    • Obtain service information
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACRT 156 Estimating/Shop Management

    4 credits


    This course focuses on learning how to estimate the cost to repair damage using the estimating systems found in the industry. It also covers technology and procedures used to manage a shop.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 145 , ACRT 245 , ACRT 245, or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Global Outcomes:
     

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create an electronic estimate
    • Order parts used for repair
    • Interact with sublet relationships
    • Track and maintain equipment, tools, and supplies
    • Implement basic lean processing techniques
    • Interact professionally with customers
    • Interact professionally with insurance companies
    • List the different types of jobs available in the industry
    • Create and maintain a safe & efficient shop
    • Follow general shop, material, and personal safety procedures
    • Read and interpret Materials Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)
    • Correctly label hazardous materials
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60

  
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    ACRT 225 Refinishing Application Procedures

    4 credits
    This course focuses on learning and practicing the skills, procedures, & techniques necessary to apply various refinishing products.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 125 , ACRT 126 , ACRT 226 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • Apply primer coats, sealers, base coats, and clear coats
    • Apply solid color, pearls, tri-coats, and metallic paints
    • Apply single stage paints
    • Spray vertical and horizontal surfaces
    • Blend into adjacent panels
    • Refinish plastic parts
    • Perform other common types of refinishing techniques
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    ACRT 226 Color Mixing, Matching & Paint Problems

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge, and skills needed to properly complete paint mixing and matching procedures. Paint problem identification and resolutions are also covered.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 125 , ACRT 126 , ACRT 225 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • Apply knowledge of basic color theory
    • Plot solid colors
    • Plot metallic colors
    • Match colors
    • Measure, mix, and test viscosity for various paint materials
    • Tint base coats
    • Create let-down panels and spray-out cards
    • Use manual and electronic color directories
    • Find color codes on vehicles
    • Identify various types of paint problems and resolutions
    • Use other common types of paint shop equipment and tools
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACRT 235 Welded Panel Removal & Replacement

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge, and tool skills needed to remove, replace, and adjust welded-on body panels.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 135 , ACRT 136 , ACRT 236 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Select proper welded panel replacement tools and equipment
    • Plan and apply panel removal and replacement sequence
    • Separate spot welds using the proper method
    • Determine spot weld replacement positions
    • Position new panels by visual and dimensional measurement methods
    • Cut and fit overlapping panels
    • Prepare joints and flanges for welding
    • Weld panels using MIG and Spot welding equipment
    • Use other common types of shop equipment and hand tools
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    ACRT 236 Corrosion Protection

    4 credits
    This course focuses on identifying and restoring various types of corrosion protection materials currently used.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 135 , ACRT 136 , ACRT 235 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

    • Explain the various causes of corrosion
    • Identify and apply the various types of corrosion protection materials
    • Identify areas where corrosion protection is needed
    • Prepare surfaces
    • Repair corrosion protected areas
    • Use other common types of shop equipment and hand tools
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACRT 245 Plastic & Composite Panel Repairs

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills needed to properly repair plastic and composite panels.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 145 , ACRT 146 , ACRT 246 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify different types of plastic
    • Perform adhesive repairs
    • Perform plastic welding repairs
    • Repair panels with heat
    • Repair gouges, tears, punctures, cuts, cracks, and broken tabs
    • Perform single sided and two-sided repairs
    • Use other common types of shop equipment and hand tools
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACRT 246 Disassembly & Reassembly Technology & Procedures

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge, and tool skills needed to fully disassemble and reassemble parts, panels, and assemblies.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 145 , ACRT 146 , ACRT 245 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Select and use numerous removal and alignment tools
    • Identify how parts, panels, and assemblies are fastened
    • Properly remove, replace, and align mechanically fastened parts, body panels, and assemblies
    • Align panels
    • Align latches and hinges
    • Identify and remove various fasteners
    • Remove and replace interior parts, panels, and assemblies
    • Use other common types of shop equipment and hand tools
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACRT 255 Damage Analysis

    4 credits
    This course focuses on how to perform damage analysis.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 155 , ACRT 156 , ACRT 256 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the various types of direct and indirect damage
    • Identify the various types of structural and non-structural damage
    • Determine necessary sublet work
    • Determine if a vehicle is totaled
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACRT 256 Mechanical and Electrical Systems

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the basics of identifying and diagnosing mechanical and electrical system repair needs.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125 , or instructor permission.

    Corequisites: ACRT 155 , ACRT 156 , ACRT 255 , or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Inspect exhaust systems for damage
    • Inspect radiator and air conditioning systems for damage
    • Define the elements of proper wheel alignment, including caster, camber, toe, thrust line alignment, steering axis inclination, and turning radius
    • Describe the design and operation of parallelogram, rack-and-pinion, and four wheel steering
    • Explain the operation of front, rear, and computer suspension systems
    • Explain different electrical diagnostic equipment
    • Describe air bag system and restraint system servicing requirements
    • Use other common types of shop equipment and hand tools


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACRT 265 Advanced Non-Structural Repair

    4 credits
    In this hands-on course students perform non-structural repairs on customer vehicles in a body shop environment.

    Prerequisites: ACRT 226 , ACRT 236 , ACRT 246 , ACRT 256 .

    Corequisites: ACRT 266 , ACRT 267 , ACRT 268 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply all the non-structural skills learned in previous quarters to customer vehicles in a body shop environment
    • Repair sheet metal panels
    • Repair plastic and composite panels
    • Apply body fillers
    • Tear down and reassemble customer vehicles
    • Use other common types of shop equipment and hand tools
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    ACRT 266 Advanced Structural Repair

    4 credits
    In this hands-on course students perform structural repairs on customer vehicles in a shop environment.

    Prerequisites: ACRT 226 , ACRT 236 , ACRT 246 , ACRT 256 .

    Corequisites: ACRT 265 , ACRT 267 , ACRT 268 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • Apply structural skills learned in previous quarters to customer vehicles in a body shop environment
    • Disassemble, repair or replace doors and door glass
    • Rack and anchor a customer vehicle on a frame rack
    • Measure and analyze a customer vehicle
    • Make structural pulls on a frame rack
    • Replace welded on panels
    • Replace various types of corrosion protection on a customer vehicle
    • Use other common types of shop equipment and hand tools
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACRT 267 Advanced Refinishing

    4 credits
    In this hands-on course students prep, refinish, and detail customer vehicles.

    Prerequisites: ACRT 226 , ACRT 236 , ACRT 246 , ACRT 256 .

    Corequisites: ACRT 265 , ACRT 266 , ACRT 268 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply prep, refinish, and detailing skills learned in previous quarters to customer vehicles in a body shop environment
    • Apply primer coats, sealers, base coats, and clear coats
    • Apply solid color, pearls, tri-coats, and metallic paints
    • Apply single stage paints
    • Spray vertical and horizontal surfaces
    • Blend into adjacent panels
    • Mix, match, tint, and measure paint materials
    • Create let-down panels and spray-out cards
    • Use manual and electronic color directories
    • Find color codes on vehicles
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ACRT 268 Advanced Estimating & Shop Management

    4 credits
    In this hands-on course students create estimates for customers and manage the customer relationships.

    Prerequisites: ACRT 226 , ACRT 236 , ACRT 246 , ACRT 256 .

    Corequisites: ACRT 265 , ACRT 266 , ACRT 267 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create an electronic estimate
    • Order parts used for repair
    • Interact with sublet relationships
    • Interact professionally with customers
    • Follow general shop, material, and personal safety procedures
    • Obtain service and repair information
    • Identify the direct and indirect damage
    • Identify the structural and non-structural damage
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ARST 211 Introduction to Automotive Restoration

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge, and tool skills to expose students to the principles of automotive restoration and team/project management skills.

    Prerequisites: ACRT 226 , ACRT 236 , ACRT 246 , and ACRT 256  

    Corequisites: ARST 212 , ARST 213 , and ARST 216  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Determine the scope and sequence of a restoration project
    • Develop a restoration plan
    • Develop a cost vs. worth analysis
    • Develop a restoration schedule
    • Collaborate with others to complete projects
    • Develop a team
    • Motivate team members
    • Manage a project timeline
    • Solve problems as they come up
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ARST 212 Automotive Restoration Repairs

    4 credits
    This hands-on course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and skills needed to fully repair an older vehicle.

    Prerequisites: ACRT 226 , ACRT 236 , ACRT 246 , and ACRT 256  

    Corequisites: ARST 211 , ARST 213 , and ARST 216  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Set up straightening equipment
    • Rack and anchor a vehicle
    • Plan and execute a pulling sequence
    • Analyze sheet metal damage
    • Rough straighten metal
    • Final straighten metal
    • Apply body fillers
    • Properly remove, replace, and align parts, body panels, and assemblies
    • Use a computer and industry sources to identify the proper sources of material, techniques, and products needed to complete restoration decisions
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    ARST 213 Automotive Restoration Refinishing

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge and tool skills necessary to refinish an older vehicle.

    Prerequisites: ACRT 226 , ACRT 236 , ACRT 246 , and ACRT 256  

    Corequisites: ARST 211 , ARST 212 , and ARST 216  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Evaluate surface conditions
    • Remove and feather existing paint
    • Prepare bare metal for paint
    • Final sand surfaces
    • Color sand new paint
    • Buff and polish surfaces
    • Use various masking supplies & techniques
    • Clean, detail, and care for new finishes
    • Apply primer coats, sealers, base coats, and clear coats
    • Measure and mix paint materials
    • Create let-down panels and spray-out cards
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    ARST 216 Automotive Restoration Estimating

    4 credits
    This hands-on course focuses on the procedures, product knowledge, and tool skills necessary to estimate the costs involved in restoring an older vehicle.

    Prerequisites: ACRT 226 , ACRT 236 , ACRT 246 , and ACRT 256  

    Corequisites: ARST 211 , ARST 212 , and ARST 213  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create an electronic estimate
    • Order parts used for repair
    • Track and maintain equipment, tools, and supplies
    • Interact professionally with customers
    • Create and maintain a safe and efficient shop
    • Follow general shop, material, and personal safety procedures
    • Identify the various types of direct and indirect damage
    • Identify the various types of structural and non-structural damage
    • Determine necessary sublet work
    • Inspect mechanical systems for damage
    • Comply with hazardous material laws and processes
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety procedures


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

Automotive Repair Technician

  
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    AUTO 120 Electrical/Electronics Systems

    14 credits
    This course focuses on the understanding and repair of automotive electrical, electronic systems utilizing industry standards and techniques.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125 , or instructor permission

    Corequisites: AUTO 124  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Diagnose and repair electrical systems
    • List battery rating systems, configurations and safety
    • Replace, service, test and charge batteries
    • Diagnose, repair, replace common types of electrical circuit components
    • Use Multimeters and other types of testing equipment to test electrical circuits, components, batteries, starting systems and charging systems
    • Diagnose, test and repair/replace starting systems
    • Diagnose, test and repair/replace charging systems
    • Diagnose and analyze electrical parasitic drain
    • Diagnose, test and repair/replace lighting systems
    • Diagnose, test and repair/replace horn/wiper systems
    • Diagnose, test and repair/replace gauges/warning devices/driver information systems
    • Diagnose, test and repair/replace accessory systems
    • Diagnose, test and repair/replace door trim/power lock and window systems
    • Safely disarm and enable Supplemental Restraint System
    • Safely remove and properly replace Supplemental Restraint System components
    • Use oscilloscopes to diagnose engine, electrical/electronic problems
    • List the construction and describe the operation of sensors and actuators, their relationship to modes and strategies
    • Apply the knowledge of hazardous material laws and processes to their training and future employment


    Total Hours: 220 Lecture Hours: 60 Lab or Clinical Hours: 160
  
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    AUTO 124 Maintenance Procedures

    2 credits
    This course focuses on the understanding of periodic maintenance intervals and procedures utilizing industry standards, techniques, and equipment.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , TRAN 125 , or instructor permission

    Corequisites: AUTO 120  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • Work with customer to accurately fill out repair orders
    • Perform a visual inspection
    • Perform an on-the-ground safety checklist
    • Accurately fill out car care service form
    • Use flat-rate manual to create an estimate of repair cost
    • Safely perform battery service
    • Safely perform battery jump starting
    • Safely perform battery charging-on or off the vehicle
    • Identify/inspect/replace accessory drive belts, and coolant hoses
    • Inspect operation of the lighting system
    • Perform headlight adjusting with aiming tools
    • Perform cooling system inspection
    • Check and correct coolant level
    • Check oil levels in engine, drive axle, standard transmission/transaxle
    • Identify parts of the oil filter
    • Check automatic transmission fluid (ATF) level
    • Safely raise and support a vehicle using a floor jack and jack stands
    • Safely raise a vehicle using a frame-contact lift
    • Change engine oil and filter
    • Perform chassis lubrication
    • Identify major under car  service components
    • Perform a complete, mileage specific, maintenance and inspection service


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    AUTO 134 Engine Performance - Ignition

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the understanding, analysis and repair of automotive ignition systems utilizing industry standards and techniques. This course teaches to the global outcome of communication.

    Prerequisites: AUTO 120 , AUTO 124 , or instructor permission

    Corequisites: AUTO 135 , AUTO 136 , and AUTO 138  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Do preliminary engine testing such as compression testing, leak down testing, vacuum testing and relative cylinder performance
    • Use oscilloscopes to diagnose engine, electrical/electronic problems
    • Understand mechanical function of the engine as a air pump to diagnose pressure and flow problems
    • Perform noninvasive engine mechanical tests related to diagnosing drivability problems
    • Work with customers, isolate problems, test drive as applicable, write professional work orders, and use flat rate schedules to write estimates
    • Use electronic service information and reference manuals to obtain pertinent information in diagnosing and repairing automobiles
    • Utilize the principles of technician repair law and other consumer protection laws
    • Use manufacturer flow chart  testing sequences and apply this knowledge to diagnosing problems and repairing customer vehicles


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    AUTO 135 Engine Performance - Fuel

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the understanding and repair of automotive fuel delivery systems utilizing industry standards, techniques, and equipment.

    Prerequisites: AUTO 120 , AUTO 124 , or instructor permission

    Corequisites: AUTO 134 , AUTO 136 , and AUTO 138  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • List fuel chemistry, types, additives, and refining process
    • List the combustion process and the effect of air/fuel ratios on emission control
    • List construction and operation of fuel delivery components and make proper test of electrical fuel pumps on fuel injection systems
    • Remove and replace components on typical fuel systems
    • List feedback principles as they relate to fuel injection and be able to apply this knowledge to learning more complex objectives in computer control courses
    • List computerized fuel management systems by manufacturer and apply this knowledge to the diagnosis and repair of fuel management systems
    • List fuel injection principles and construction details, mechanical and electronic
    • Diagnose fuel injection related drivability problems, making repairs and adjustments as necessary
    • Apply the knowledge of standard & tuned port induction systems to diagnose intake volumetric efficiency problems
    • List exhaust system and volumetric efficiency problems
    • Identify Forced induction systems both turbocharger and supercharger systems including intercoolers and waste gates
    • Communicate with customers, isolate problems, test drive as applicable, write professional work orders, and use flat rate schedules to write estimates
    • Use electronic service information and reference manuals to obtain information in diagnosing and repairing automobiles
    • Research and practice the principles of Technician Repair Law and other consumer protection laws
    • Use logical testing sequences, and apply this knowledge to diagnosing problems, and repairing customer vehicles
    • Demonstrate communication and customer relation skills needed to interact professionally with employers, customers, and fellow workers while performing fuel system repairs


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    AUTO 136 Engine Performance - Emissions

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the understanding, repair and service of automotive emission systems and devices utilizing industry standards and techniques.

    Prerequisites: AUTO 120 , AUTO 124 , or instructor permission

    Corequisites: AUTO 134 , AUTO 135 , and AUTO 138  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • List emission laws, standards, certification and the waiver process
    • List vehicle emissions and their relationship to each other
    • Use 4 or 5 gas analyzer to measure emission levels and verify proper engine performance
    • List the construction and operation of common types of mechanical and computerized emission devices and apply this knowledge to diagnosis and repair of computerized emission systems
    • Diagnose and repair automotive computer systems
    • Use lab scopes, scanners, and other analyzers to retrieve data stream information
    • Pass the State Automotive Emission Specialist Test.
    • Work with customers, isolate problems, test drive as applicable, write professional work orders, and use flat rate schedules to write estimates
    • Use electronic service information and reference manuals to obtain  pertinent information in diagnosing and repairing automobiles
    • Practice the principles of Technician Repair Law and other consumer protection laws
    • Use testing sequences and apply this knowledge to diagnosing problems and repairing customer vehicles
    • Practice flat rate on vehicles
    • Demonstrate communication and customer relation skills needed to interact professionally with employers, customers, and fellow workers


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    AUTO 138 Engine Performance - Computer Control

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the understanding and repair of the Onboard Diagnostic system and automotive computer controls utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment.

    Prerequisites: AUTO 120 , AUTO 124 , or instructor permission

    Corequisites: AUTO 134 , AUTO 135 , and AUTO 136  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • List and describe automotive computer basics, terminology, control module operation, feedback loop technology
    • List manufactures typical computer control network systems
    • List the construction and describe the operation of sensors and actuators, their relationship to modes and strategies
    • Diagnose automotive computer systems
    • Remove and replace computer system components
    • Apply the knowledge of hazardous material laws and processes to their training and future employment
    • Practice proper computer and PROM handling procedures
    • Demonstrate communications and customer relations skills needed to interact professionally with employers, customers, and fellow workers


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    AUTO 140 Brake Systems

    10 credits
    This course focuses on the diagnosis, repair and service of automotive brakes and anti-lock brake control systems utilizing industry standards, technique and equipment.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125  

    Corequisites: AUTO 144  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • List and describe principles of hydraulics and electronics as they relate to brake systems
    • List construction and identify components of typical brake systems
    • List and describe the geometry and measurements of most types of brake systems
    • Analyze brake noises and vibrations
    • Remove and replace typical brake system components using the proper tools and techniques
    • Use shop equipment dealing with brake systems, including measuring tools, brake lathes, cleaning equipment and ABS scanners
    • Make brake system measurements, corrections and repairs as necessary
    • Apply the knowledge of hazardous material laws and processes to brake systems, the student’s training and future employment
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety while working on brake systems and while lifting the vehicle
    • Demonstrate communication and customer relation skills needed to interact professionally with employers, customers and fellow workers while working on brake systems


    Total Hours: 160 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 120
  
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    AUTO 144 Suspension, Steering, and Alignment

    6 credits
    This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis and repair of automotive suspension, steering and alignment principles utilizing industry standards, equipment and techniques.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125  

    Corequisites: AUTO 140  

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe construction and identify components of typical steering and suspension systems
    • Describe the geometry and measurements of common steering and suspension systems
    • Describe sizes and construction of tires and wheels as they relate to the industry
    • Safely disarm and enable Supplemental Restraint System
    • Safely remove and properly replace Supplemental Restraint System components
    • Perform damage and defective parts analysis on most types of steering and suspension systems
    • Analyze Suspension and Steering noises and vibrations
    • Remove and replace most types of steering and suspension components using the proper tools and techniques
    • Use shop equipment dealing with steering/suspension/alignment, including four wheel alignment rack, tire machines, wheel balancers, and McPherson strut tools
    • Make measurements and corrections as necessary/applicable
    • Apply the knowledge of hazardous material laws and processes to their training and future employment
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety to lifting vehicles and performing suspension repair and alignment procedures
    • Interact professionally with employers, customers and fellow workers while working on suspensions and performing alignments 


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    AUTO 199 Special Projects I

    1-5 credits
    Total Hours: 110 Lab or Clinical Hours: 110
  
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    AUTO 210 Engines, Cylinder Blocks, and Cooling Systems

    10 credits
    This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis, repair and servicing of automotive engines and cooling systems utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125  

    Corequisites: AUTO 215  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Perform preliminary engine testing such as compression testing, leak down testing, vacuum test and relative cylinder performance
    • Use oscilloscopes to diagnose engine, electrical/electronic problems as it relates to mechanical problems
    • Describe construction and identify components of most types of engine and cooling systems
    • Describe the technology and make measurements on most types of engine systems
    • Perform pressure testing of cooling systems and radiator caps
    • Remove and replace typical engine and cooling system components using the proper tools and techniques
    • Remove and replace engines using the proper tools and techniques
    • Analyze engine noises and vibrations
    • Use common types of shop equipment dealing with measuring and testing engine and cooling systems
    • Apply the knowledge of hazardous material laws and processes to their training and future employment
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety to engine removal and replacement and other life applications
    • Demonstrate communication and customer relation skills needed to interact professionally with employers, customers and fellow workers as they pertain to engine repair/replacement


    Total Hours: 160 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 120
  
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    AUTO 215 Air Conditioning Service

    6 credits
    This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis and repair of automotive air conditioning and heating systems utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125  

    Corequisites: AUTO 210  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Remove and replace A/C components
    • Hook up both R12 and R134A gauges set and trouble shoot systems
    • Retrofit R12 systems to R134A
    • Service A/C systems
    • Analyze A/C noises and vibrations
    • Apply the knowledge of hazardous material laws and processes as pertains to HFC/CFC refrigerant handling
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws, common sense safety to work and life applications
    • Demonstrate communication and customer relation skills needed to interact professionally with employers, customers, and fellow workers while completing air conditioning service procedures


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    AUTO 220 Automatic Transmission and Transaxles

    8 credits
    This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis and repair of automotive automatic transmissions and transaxles utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125  

    Corequisites: AUTO 225  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe construction and identify components of most types of auto transmissions/transaxles
    • Describe the technology and make measurements on most types of auto transmissions/transaxles
    • Remove and replace auto transmissions/transaxles. Due to the weight and bulk of these components, this needs to be a coordinated effort (teamwork).
    • Do damage and defective parts analysis on most types of auto transmissions/transaxles
    • Analyze auto transmission/transaxle noises and vibrations
    • Remove and replace most types of automatic transmission/transaxle components using the proper tools and techniques
    • Perform repair procedures on automatic transmission/transaxles as outlined by instructor
    • Apply the knowledge of hazardous material laws and processes to their training and future employment
    • Apply the knowledge of safety laws and common sense safety to transmission removal/replacement and other applications
    • Demonstrate communication and customer relation skills needed to interact professionally with employers, customers, and fellow workers as they pertain to transmission repair procedures


    Total Hours: 130 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 100
  
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    AUTO 225 Manual Transmission and Transaxles

    8 credits
    This course focuses on the understanding, diagnosis and repair of automotive manual transmissions, transaxles, clutches, differentials and drive axles utilizing industry standards, techniques and equipment.

    Prerequisites: TRAN 110 , TRAN 112 , TRAN 113 , and TRAN 125  

    Corequisites: AUTO 220  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe construction and identify components of most types of manual transmission, clutch and transaxles
    • Describe the technology and make measurements on most types of manual transmission, clutch and transaxles
    • Trace gear train power flow
    • Do damage and defective parts analysis on most types of manual transmission, clutch and transaxles
    • Analyze manual transmission, transaxle, clutch, differential and drive axle noises and vibrations
    • Remove and replace most types of manual drive train components using the proper tools and techniques
    • Use most types of shop equipment dealing with manual drive train systems including the various hoist, lifting equipment, hydraulic presses and other small equipment
    • List construction and identify components of most types of differentials and drive axles including four wheel drive systems
    • Describe technology and make measurements on most types of differentials and drive axle systems
    • Trace power flow and make appropriate tests on differentials and drive axle systems
    • Remove and replace differentials, drive axles, and four wheel drive systems. Due to the weight and bulk of these components, this needs to be a coordinated effort (teamwork).
    • Do damage and defective parts analysis on most types of differentials and drive axles
    • Remove and replace most types of differentials and drive axle components using the proper tools and techniques


    Total Hours: 130 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 100
  
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    AUTO 298 Job Search and Employability Skills

    1 credits
    Students develop job search objectives and practice employability skills needed for successful employment.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course this student will be able to:

    • Conduct new trade information interviews and review earlier trade information  interviews to determine future employment options
    • Develop, set and implement job search goals
    • Write an effective resume
    • Write an effective interest letter
    • Write an effective thank you letter
    • Develop cooperatively with instructor a work plan for this unit that involves specific objectives by developing a portfolio of skills acquired and those needed


    Total Hours: 10 Lecture Hours: 10

Baking Arts

  
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    BAKE 110 Cake Decoration

    6 credits
    This course is an introduction to cake decorating skills. Students will learn piping skills and techniques. Buttercream, fondant and gumpaste methods will be explored to create special occasion cakes and design wedding cakes.

    Prerequisites: CULA 127  

    Corequisites: BAKE 120  

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course student s will be able to:

    • Assemble and decorate a variety of special occasion cakes to industry standards
    • Apply buttercream, fondant, and gumpaste techniques


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    BAKE 114 Artisan Chocolates and Confections

    6 credits
    This course is an introduction to specialty chocolates and confections. Students will explore the creation, design, and marketing of truffles, candies, caramel and confections. Students will learn chocolate handling, tempering, and origin.

    Prerequisites: CULA 127  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Temper, identify, and handle chocolate
    • Create rolled and molded truffles
    • Create candies and caramels
    • Make fudge
    • Make nougat and marshmallows
    • Create jelly confections


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    BAKE 120 Specialty Cakes and Design

    6 credits
    This course is an introduction to specialty cakes. Students will learn construction and a variety of techniques to create classical cakes. The focus is on formulas, fillings, icings and finishing to produce salable bakery items.

    Prerequisites: CULA 127 .

    Corequisites: BAKE 110 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Determine appropriate method and design techniques for various types of cakes
    • Use proper ingredients, methods and equipment
    • Assemble and decorate specialty cakes to industry standards
    • Coordinate supplies and develop production schedules


    Total Hours: 90 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 60
  
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    BAKE 122 Artisan Bread

    6 credits
    Students will learn the advanced techniques for making specialty bread using preferment techniques and starters.

    Prerequisites: CULA 127  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explore pre-ferments and sourdough cultures
    • Use proper  scaling methods while understanding ingredients and their functions
    • Use production methods needed to move product through the bakeshop according to industry standards


    Total Hours: 100 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 80
  
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    BAKE 124 Centerpiece Construction

    3 credits
    Students will learn the advanced techniques for constructing specialty centerpieces and showpieces. Advanced techniques for chocolate, sugar and bread sculpture construction will be learned.

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Properly temper and handle chocolate
    • Properly apply multiple sugar techniques
    • Work with inert bread dough in the construction of centerpieces
    • Create and design showpieces using methods that are structurally sound and withstand time and movement


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BAKE 126 Retail Bakery Management

    6 credits
    Students will be introduced to quick service venues in a live, hands-on, lab format. Students will work with point of sales systems, customer service, sales, bakery, catering, retail, barista training, and food product production management. Quick service venues are turnkey style business operations.

    Prerequisites: CULA 127  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate employability and production planning on a daily basis
    • Set up cold food line and generate profits
    • Work independently to complete a shift
    • Use a Point of Sale System
    • Develop barista production skills
    • Provide customer satisfaction
    • Identify, select, and apply the proper product quality identification with an emphasis on bakery and breakfast service
    • Work with others on a team to complete successful bakery production


    Total Hours: 150 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 120

Biology

  
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    BIOL 099 Introduction to Health Sciences

    2 credits
    This course provides an introduction to the types of content common to the biological science classes required for entry into many healthcare programs. This course increases students’ readiness for these courses through the use of oral and written assignments developed in the context of the health sciences.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046 .

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • List and describe key anatomy and physiology and medical terminology concepts and master essential vocabulary in terms of spelling, pronunciation, and word use
    • Apply knowledge of word parts (prefixes, roots, and suffixes) to understand and infer the meaning of medical terminology
    • Increase reading skills and comprehension of healthcare-related content
    • Identify and summarize main ideas in healthcare context readings
    • Apply reading strategies (such as scanning, skimming, and guessing meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary) to health science texts
    • Write paragraphs summarizing healthcare-related readings
    • Identify the educational and career pathway for desired occupational goal
    • Navigate relevant websites and select, evaluate, and use information


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
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    BIOL 311 Public Health Biology

    5 credits
    This course will provide an introduction to the biological foundations of public health. Topics include human chronic and hereditary diseases and disorders (such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, etc.), infectious disease and host response, the role of genetics and the environment on health, and human physiology.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the BASPH program or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Explain the function of the immune system and other related human systems in regard to health
    • Describe the role, benefits, and limitations of vaccines in assuring the health of populations
    • Relate basic principles of cell biology, biochemistry, and genetics to problems in physical, behavioral, and mental health
    • Analyze the interaction of genetics, lifestyle, and the environment in the health of a population
    • Integrate general biological and molecular principles into public health problems such as infectious disease, disease susceptibility, drug resistance, and assisted reproduction
    • Explain the relationships among nutrition, physical activity, and health
    • Describe the most prevalent global diseases in terms of patterns, etiology, risk factors, clinical aspects and major issues in prevention and control
    • Describe human molecular, cellular, and physiological interactions with exogenous agents
    • Describe the various ways by which chemicals can directly or indirectly affect human health
    • Describe the ecological principles of disease and how these principles affect the likelihood of control
    • Discuss the multiple factors that influence infectious disease epidemics


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BIOL& 160 General Biology with Lab

    5 credits


    An examination of the biology of life which includes chemistry, organic molecules, cell structure, membrane transport, metabolic processes, mitosis and meiosis, nucleic acid structure and function, genetics, and introduces the concept of biotechnology. Includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher)

    CHEM& 121  strongly recommended

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course student will be able to:

    • Apply the scientific method to problem solving and research
    • Describe the roles of subatomic particles as they relate to chemical bonds
    • Describe the role of organic macromolecules in the function of the cell
    • List the structure and function of cell organelles of the eukaryotic cell and compare to the prokaryotic cell
    • Examine the various means by which substances move across the cell membrane.
    • Compare the pathways of cellular respiration including glycolysis, Kreb’s cycle, electron transport chain, and chemiosmosis
    • Describe the processes of fermentation and photosynthesis
    • Compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis
    • Describe the structure of nucleic acids and the processes of replication, transcription and translation
    • Solve hereditary problems using Mendalian and non-Mendalian inheritance principles
    • Describe current applications of biotechnology
    • Research course topics using various tools such as professional journal articles, internet, and library resources
    • Interpret scientific data through case study examination


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    BIOL& 175 Human Biology with Lab

    5 credits
    An introductory survey of human anatomy and physiology designed for non-science majors or pre-allied health students not going into nursing or dental hygiene. Relationships between structures and functions in each body system are emphasized.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher) and ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify relevant terminology to the study of human anatomy and physiology
    • Differentiate the structural levels of organization within the human body
    • Define and provide examples of homeostasis and explain how it is maintained
    • Explain the physiological inter-relationships between organ systems of the human body
    • Identify major anatomical structures of the human body
    • Research pathologies associated with organ systems


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BIOL& 211 Majors Cellular

    5 credits
    First in a three-course biology sequence for science students. This course introduces the principles of cellular and molecular biology. Emphasis is placed on evolution, cellular structures of prokaryote and eukaryote cells, metabolism, DNA replication and gene expression, mitosis and meiosis, Mendelian genetics and inheritance, and biotechnology. Includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093  (or placement into ENGL 099  or higher) and CHEM& 121  

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe evolutionary changes
    • Describe the role of organic macromolecules in the function of the cell
    • List the structure and function of cell organelles of the eukaryotic cell and compare to the prokaryotic cell
    • Examine the various means by which substances move across the cell membrane
    • Compare the pathways of cellular respiration including glycolysis, Krebs’s cycle, electron transport chain, and chemiosmosis, fermentation, and photosynthesis
    • Describe the structure of nucleic acids and the processes of DNA replication, transcription, translation, and gene expression
    • Describe cell signaling
    • Compare mitosis and meiosis
    • Solve hereditary problems using Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance principles
    • Describe current applications of biotechnology
    • Apply the scientific method to research and problem solving
    • Interpret scientific data by using statistical analysis and generating phylogenetic trees and bioinformatics


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BIOL& 212 Majors Animal

    5 credits
    Continuation of the three quarter majors biology series (may be taken second or third in sequence). Emphasis is placed on the evolution and biological diversity of animals; general principles of animal physiology, growth, and development; select animal systems; and how animal systems interact. Includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 211  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply scientific methodology to evaluate and draw conclusions about original and published data and experiments
    • Describe the theory of evolution through natural selection and identify and describe the scientific evidence used to support evolutionary theory
    • Identify and evaluate the factors responsible for evolution within a population (microevolution)
    • Define the term biological species and explain how new species emerge
    • Describe the macroevolutionary history of animal evolution and diversity
    • Describe how organisms are classified on the basis of evolutionary relationships using standard taxonomy and hierarchical phylogenetic trees
    • Identify the characteristics used to classify an organism as an animal, and compare and contrast the body plans and developmental characteristics of key animal phyla
    • Describe select major animal organ systems and physiological processes for diverse animal phyla, including homeostasis; nutrition and digestion; circulation; immunity; fluid balance; reproductive, sensory and motor systems
    • Use appropriate biological terms to provide oral and written explanations of scientific concepts and lab results
    • Safely implement laboratory procedures and methods, including comparative dissections and use of the scientific method to investigate animal biology topics
    • Observe, measure, record, and analyze data using standard scientific instrumentation and methods
    • Present lab data in graphical form, analyze and interpret results
    • Research course topics using various resources
    • Interpret scientific data through case studies


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BIOL& 213 Majors Plant

    5 credits
    Continuation of the three quarter majors biology series (may be taken second or third in sequence). Emphasis is placed on evolution, ecology, and biological principles of monera, fungi, and select protisa and plants, including their physical, anatomy, and growth processes and diversity. Includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 211  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply scientific methodology to evaluate and draw conclusions about original and published data and experiments
    • Describe the diversity, evolutionary relatedness, and ecological importance of prokaryotes, fungi, algae, and plants by comparing their morphological, metabolic, and reproductive characteristics
    • Discuss the structural modifications and physiological adaptations that allowed plants to transition from aquatic to terrestrial life
    • Identify and describe the four main plant groups: bryophytes, pterophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms
    • Identify the alternation of generations life cycle differences among major plant groups
    • Discuss the essential structures involved with water and sugar movement in plants and describe nutritional growth requirements for plants
    • Define ecology and describe the different branches of ecological study
    • Describe the ecological and economic benefits of biodiversity
    • Discuss current threats to biodiversity and the role of conservation biology
    • Use appropriate biological terms to provide oral and written explanations of scientific concepts and lab results
    • Safely implement laboratory procedures
    • Observe, measure, record, and analyze data using standard scientific instrumentation and methods
    • Present lab data in graphical form, analyze and interpret results
    • Research course topics using various resources
    • Interpret scientific data through case studies


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BIOL& 241 Anatomy and Physiology 1

    6 credits
    The first quarter of a two-quarter sequence designed to give students a working knowledge and understanding of the basic systems of the human body. Includes a basic introduction to chemistry as well as a detailed study of cytology and histology and examines the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and sensory systems.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 160  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Interpret the inseparable relationship between the structure and function of the human organism and illustrate how all of the body systems integrate and form a functioning organism
    • Demonstrate the ability to practice safe laboratory procedures
    • Demonstrate the ability to use dissection instruments appropriately
    • Demonstrate the ability to integrate concepts as demonstrated by the ability to identify similarities between different systems of the body
    • Demonstrate the ability to perform literary research and identify and locate appropriate resources to answer questions about the human body and its pathologies
    • Demonstrate effective communication skills to a peer audience, using different media, by being able to present a common pathology of the body, and its related physiological processes


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 50 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BIOL& 242 Anatomy and Physiology 2

    6 credits
    The second quarter of a two-quarter sequence designed to give students a working knowledge and understanding of the basic systems of the human body. The systems covered are Endocrine, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic, Respiratory, Digestive, Urinary, and Reproductive. The themes of homeostasis and system interactions are interwoven into the course and are continually stressed as each system is introduced and discussed.

    Prerequisites: BIOL& 241  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    • Interpret the relationship between the structure and function of the human organism and illustrate how all of the body systems integrate and form a functioning organism
    • Consistently practice safe laboratory procedures
    • Use dissection instruments appropriately
    • Integrate concepts by identifying and comparing similarities between different systems of the body
    • Perform literary research and identify and locate appropriate resources to answer questions about the human body and its pathologies
    • Communicate to a peer audience, using different media, by being able to present a common pathology of the body, and its related physiological processes
    • Make sequential assumptions of human physiology and pathophysiology based on knowledge of human anatomy and physiology


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 50 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BIOL& 260 Microbiology

    5 credits
    Introduces students to the major concepts of the microbiological science. These concepts include basic anatomy, physiology and the differences between eukaryotic, prokaryotic and viral systems, growth factors and curves, techniques in microbial control, microbial interrelationships and host defenses. Includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: CHEM& 121 , BIOL& 160 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Define and explain the principles of microbiology
    • Compare and contrast the anatomical and physiological attributes of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells
    • Distinguish the differences between viruses and bacteria
    • Describe how viruses differ from eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells
    • Examine factors required for growth of microbial populations both in vitro and in vivo.
    • Describe the principles of disease transmission
    • Distinguish between different types of immune response
    • Explain how host systems react to injury and/or invasion by pathogenic agents
    • Categorize various techniques for immunization
    • Identify common inhabitants of the oral ecology and the diseases they cause


    Total Hours: 70 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40

Business

  
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    BUS& 101 Introduction to Business

    5 credits


    The course covers the survey of American business, business and economic terminology, forms of business ownership, franchising, small and international business, management and marketing concepts, and business environment.

    Prerequisites: MATH 087 , ENGL 099  or equivalent placement scores.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Critically evaluate business in the American free market system
    • Demonstrate understanding of the fundamental concepts in marketing, finance and human relations
    • Apply the fundamentals of business management and determine proper ethical behavior
    • Discuss how demographic shifts within the US affect may affect business culture and operations
    • Describe the changes in etiquette and culture necessary for businesses to expand and succeed internationally
    • Demonstrate the daily business conduct expected in various business situations


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

  
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    BUS& 201 Business Law

    5 credits
    This is an introductory course which covers the basic study of the structure and function of the American legal system as it relates to business transactions. Emphasis is placed on U.S. contract law, the Uniform Commercial Code, and negotiable instruments.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 099  or equivalent placement score.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply correct legal terminology in describing the structure and function of the American legal system and selected areas of law affecting business transactions
    • Apply the law of contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code, Article 2, Sales, to business relations, particularly as they impact the ownership and operation of business
    • Describe the law and Article 3 of the Uniform Commercial Code regarding various types of negotiable instruments
    • Outline the concepts of intentional torts, negligence, strict liability, and product liability
    • Identify types of business organizations, including sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations
    • Outline the basic principles of agency law, employment law, and international law as they affect US business
    • Apply ethical principles to the business context, especially as these concepts apply to their participation in the business and professional arena
    • Describe the relationship between criminal and business law
    • Describe the government’s constitutional authority to regulate business
    • Reason clearly, responsibly, and succinctly when faced with legal problems and questions


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    BUSA 180 Small Business Management

    5 credits
    This survey course examines specific principles of small business management, and business plan development. It focuses on analyzing management problems that relate to operations, human resources, marketing and consumer behavior.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  (or placement into ENGL 093  or higher) and ABED 040  (or placement into MATH 087  or higher)

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the principles for starting and operating a small business
    • Recommend sources of information for use in starting and operating a small business
    • Identify specific types of business ownership
    • Identify characteristics of consumer behavior
    • Summarize various employee motivation theories
    • Differentiate between leadership and management strategies
    • Describe operational problems common to small business and identify possible solutions
    • Identify key elements in successful marketing efforts
    • Interpret financial statement information
    • Compose his/her own business plan


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    BUSA 189 Principles of Management

    5 credits
    Modern management is both exciting and challenging today. This course is organized around the four traditional functions of management: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Contemporary topics, such as technology, empowerment, diversity, and Total Quality Management (TQM), will also be discussed.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the functions of management
    • Describe new employer-employee relationships in the workforce
    • Identify the current forces shaping management practice today and for the future
    • List the skills you need to be an effective manager
    • Identify the keys to gaining advantage over your organization’s competitors
    • Identify the basic business activities involving management


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    BUSA 210 Entrepreneurship

    5 credits
    An overview of the basics of creating a new business venture. Topics covered include identifying and evaluating opportunities, success and failure factors, and market, financial, and legal considerations.

    Prerequisites: BUS& 101  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Differentiate between business opportunities
    • Identify new venture success factors
    • Evaluate market considerations
    • Demonstrate business plan creation 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    BUSA 214 Cultural Influences on Emerging Technologies

    5 credits
    Learn about how culture and society influence the success or failure of products, services, and goods that are offered in the marketplace. Students will also explore new technologies-how they are shared between cultural groups, regulatory impacts, trade practices, and influences from international manufacturing.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 093 , MATH 087 , or instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and explain technology development lifecycles and adoption curves
    • Analyze when pure research or applied development is being performed in both a government and non-government situation
    • Demonstrate cultural awareness in marketing and product design through the analysis of the background influences that a culture makes on product success or failure in the marketplace
    • Explain the influences of international practices on domestic business and technology         
    • Analyze intercultural trade relationships and their influence on the sharing of new technology
    • Define intellectual property (including copyright and patent infringement gray areas) and explain why some countries may not be suitable partners for certain products but others may be
    • Explain the regulatory impacts of environmental and safety standards and how they may cause a technology to succeed where it may fail to be adopted otherwise
    • Identify and explain the application of the latest manufacturing methods being used in industry
    • Evaluate the feasibility of new technologies before production 


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    BUSA 220 Successful Business Marketing

    5 credits
    An overview class focusing on how to promote a small business. Topics covered include product, pricing, promotion, distribution, and customer considerations. Students learn professional sales techniques and cost effective advertising strategies.

    Prerequisites: BUS& 101  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Evaluate marketing considerations
    • Demonstrate professional selling techniques
    • Understand product and pricing considerations
    • Articulate customer service strategies


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    BUSA 230 Business Investment: Financing A New Venture

    5 credits
    This course focuses on how to fund a small business venture. Topics covered include acquisition and use of funding, money management, financial analysis and long-term budgeting.

    Prerequisites: BUS& 101  or instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Evaluate business costs and opportunities
    • Identify sources of business funding
    • Prepare funding proposals (based upon a business plan)
    • Demonstrate budgeting and financial projecting techniques


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50

Business Technology

  
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    BTE 101 Computer Applications

    2 credits
    This class is an introduction to using computers, software, and understanding computer terminology. It covers an introduction to Windows and basic word processing (Microsoft Word), spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel) and presentation software (Microsoft PowerPoint). Students will gain an understanding of what the programs are and how to create, print, and save files.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the use of the Windows operating system
    • Use basic directory and file structure
    • Use Microsoft Word to create, edit, save, and print documents
    • Use Microsoft Excel to create, edit, save, and print documents
    • Use PowerPoint to create, edit, and save presentations


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BTE 105 Keyboarding I

    3 credits
    The major objectives of this course are to develop touch control of the keyboard, develop proper keyboarding techniques, build basic speed and accuracy, and provide concentrated practice. The student must show competency by keyboarding at 30 words a minute for 3 minutes, with 3 or fewer errors.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply keyboarding skill at the rate of 30 wpm for 3 minutes with three errors or less


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    BTE 106 Keyboarding II

    3 credits
    Students continue to develop touch control of the keyboard, develop proper keyboarding techniques, and build speed and accuracy through concentrated practice. The student must show competency by keyboarding at 50 words a minute for 3 minutes, with 3 or fewer errors.

    Prerequisites: BTE 105  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Read letters, numbers, and symbols correctly
    • Operate computer hardware
    • Transfer keyboarding skills to word processing software
    • Demonstrate basic-level skill productivity through straight-copy practice
    • Demonstrate keyboarding skill in order to attain a minimum 50 words per minute with five or fewer errors on a five-minute timing


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    BTE 107 Keyboarding III

    3 credits
    Students continue to develop touch control of the keyboard and proper keyboarding techniques, build speed and accuracy. The student must show competency by keyboarding at 60 words a minute for 3 minutes, with 3 or fewer errors.

    Prerequisites: BTE 106  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Accurately perform different speed stroke combinations
    • Problem-solve in order to reinforce technique and increase keyboarding speed and accuracy
    • Record and analyze typing performance using diagnostic charts
    • Analyze progress and identify appropriate drills to remedy keyboarding weaknesses
    • Maintain a minimum standard of 60 words per minute with five or fewer errors on a five minute timing


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
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    BTE 111 Word I

    5 credits
    Beginning and intermediate word processing course covering document creation, retrieval, character and paragraph formatting, multi-page documents, columns, tables, graphics, and form letters.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create, edit, retrieve, save, and print documents
    • Format characters and paragraphs
    • Generate multiple page documents and reports
    • Create and edit tables
    • Insert and edit graphics
    • Create, edit, retrieve, and print labels
    • Create, edit, retrieve, and print form letters


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BTE 112 Excel I

    5 credits
    This is a beginning and intermediate course in spreadsheets. Topics covered include document creation, retrieval, entering text, numbers, and formulas, formatting, financial functions, what-if analysis, graphs, and charts.

    Prerequisites: BTE 120  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create, name, retrieve, and exit a spreadsheet
    • Enter and format labels and values
    • Enter simple and complex formulae
    • Use functions, what-if, and lookup commands
    • Adjust row height, column width, margins for printing
    • Use appropriate data to create pie, column, bar, and 3-D charts


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BTE 114 Access

    5 credits
    This is a beginning to intermediate course on databases. Topics covered include design of tables, forms, reports and queries; update, add, delete, and modify data; and creating custom reports and forms using filters and queries.

    Prerequisites: BTE 120  or instructor permission

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Design and plan a database
    • Create and modify a table
    • Set field properties
    • Design forms
    • Design, create, and run queries/reports


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BTE 115 Publisher

    5 credits


    Students learn the basic elements of desktop publishing using Microsoft Publisher to produce brochures, business cards, catalogs, flyers, newsletters, and invitations.

    Quarters Offered: Spring, Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Produce high quality documents
    • Effectively use templates to provide consistency within an organization
    • Format documents for visual clarity
    • Add interest to the document by inserting pictures and drawings
    • Prepare the documents for mailing (mail merge)
    • Work in a team, and to a given specification, to fulfill a brief


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    BTE 120 Business Computer Management

    3 credits
    This course will develop skills to manage desktop productivity tools and systems. Content includes file management–archiving, storing, security, and sharing. Additional content includes cookies, FTP, e-mail, and use of internet.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Manage business file systems to create, organize, store, and retrieve files electronically
    • Share, archive, and secure files electronically
    • Implement and explain established computer system policies
    • Maintain and improve computer performance
    • Download and upload files from various locations using appropriate software
    • Demonstrate how to select options and use an e-mail account
    • Use the internet/intranet for information retrieval and sharing
    • Use a Learning Management System (LMS)
    • Download, configure, and implement preventative maintenance applications
    • Use the computer to perform operating system tasks


    Total Hours: 40 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BTE 124 PowerPoint

    4 credits
    This is a beginning to intermediate course in presentation software. Topics covered include design of slides, slide sorter, and slide show. Learn to import and edit graphics, import data from spreadsheets, and use 3D effects to create slide presentations.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create, name, retrieve, print, and exit a presentation file
    • Use slide view, outline view, and notes pages
    • Choose appropriate content and layout for content
    • Choose appropriate layout/template for background
    • Place clip-art, graphs, and charts on slides
    • Change background colors, shades, and  styles
    • Set defaults using masters for slides or outlines
    • Set transition and build effects
    • Run slide show
    • Deliver a presentation to a diverse audience


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BTE 125 Web-Based Technologies

    5 credits
    Students are introduced to a variety of web-Based technologies including those used for collaboration, social-networking, video and presentation sharing, conferencing, and distance learning.

    Prerequisites: BTE 106 , BTE 120 .

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Participate in, arrange, and host an online webinar
    • Create a social media page which is maintained and published
    • Use a presentation tool and publish the presentation to a website
    • Collaborate on a document with others
    • Create a video and upload it to a website
    • Use a web-based learning management system


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    BTE 130 Business English I

    5 credits
    This course covers punctuation and grammar rules which govern business communications, composition of business letters and memos, and proofreading techniques.

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply grammar rules in written correspondence that conform to business usage
    • Apply punctuation in written documents correctly
    • Apply spelling rules to all forms of words in written communications


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 50
  
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    BTE 135 Outlook

    4 credits


    This course is designed to teach the elements of the current version of Outlook, including e-mail, calendar, contacts, and tasks.

    Prerequisites: BTE 120  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Teamwork.

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Effectively communicate with e-mail, including attachments, preformatted signature lines, address books, and broadcast messaging
    • Schedule meetings with multiple employees and resources using the calendar feature
    • Create, edit, and sort the contacts in the database
    • Manage tasks and their status
    • Create and edit notes
    • Manipulate information in regards to databases (contacts) and calendar in order to provide ease of coordination
    • Use proper language and etiquette when communicating through e-mail


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 30 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    BTE 191 Customer Service/Help Desk

    3 credits
    The student will acquire and enhance his/her communication, listening, problem solving, and decision making skills which will assist the student on the job to provide customer satisfaction.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Summer

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Intercultural Appreciation.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify and discuss major elements of communication styles
    • Evaluate current and further develop active listening skills.
    • Explain how individuals can counteract stress
    • Discuss the factors that contribute to a favorable first impression
    • Identify the three basic conflict management strategies
    • Identify the qualities of a good conflict resolution process
    • Understand and apply decision-making process
    • Practice problem solving techniques using the telephone
    • Develop and demonstrate training simulation


    Total Hours: 30 Lecture Hours: 30
  
  •  

    BTE 195 Capstone Project

    3 credits
    Students apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a project in a simulated professional setting.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Develop a plan of action using software products including, but not limited to Microsoft Office, Project, and/or Outlook
    • Integrate one or more software programs
    • Manage time and schedules to meet deadlines
    • Submit written reports on the status of a project
    • Evaluate the success of a project


    Total Hours: 50 Lecture Hours: 10 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    BTE 198 Job Search Skills

    2 credits
    This course is designed to develop knowledge and skills that will be demanded on the job to provide the student a high degree of success. Course covers how to write a resume, dependable strengths report and cover letter; searching and applying for a job, interviewing for a job, and how to follow-up on the job search.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Information Literacy.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Create, edit and rewrite a resume, dependable strengths report, and cover letter
    • Find a job using a variety of resources
    • Plan, prepare, and follow up on job interview
    • Fill out an application blank correctly
    • Simulate the actual job interview - based on program objectives


    Total Hours: 20 Lecture Hours: 20
  
  •  

    BTE 211 Word II

    5 credits
    A continuation of BTE 111 . Students learn advanced word processing skills that the Microsoft Certified Application Specialist Word exam assesses.

    Prerequisites: BTE 111  or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Use the Mail Merge Wizard to create letters, envelopes, labels, and directories
    • Sort text in paragraphs, columns, and tables; sort on more than one field
    • Use Autotext feature to automatically insert text
    • Format paragraphs
    • Create footnotes and endnotes
    • Format newspaper-style columns and create balanced columns
    • Work with clip art, WordArt, text boxes, drop caps, and watermarks
    • Format text and documents with themes, styles, style sets, and color schemes
    • Track changes in a document; create multiple versions of a document
    • Create, view, and print comments
    • Create tables of contents, indexes, tables of figures, and tables of authorities
    • Protect and secure documents
    • Perform calculations on data in a table
    • Import data from an Excel worksheet
    • Insert and modify hyperlinks
    • Insert a Web image into a Word document
    • Prioritize the processing of documents


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 20 Lab or Clinical Hours: 40
  
  •  

    BTE 212 Excel II

    5 credits
    This course covers in-depth theory and application of spreadsheets. Topics include macros, databases, what-if analysis, pivot tables, import/export, advanced formulas and creating and managing files.

    Prerequisites: BTE 112  and MATH 087  (or equivalent placement scores for MATH 098  or higher), or instructor permission.

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Work quickly and accurately in a spreadsheet application
    • Demonstrate proficiency in creating, modifying, and enhancing worksheets
    • Use advanced formula writing, functions, and templates
    • Solve problems and analyze data in business-related areas
    • Audit work
    • Create, modify, format, save, and print databases
    • Import and export data
    • Gather data and generate charts


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    BTE 225 Integrated Application for Business Productivity

    5 credits
    This course is designed to give understanding of the integration of word processing, desktop publishing, database, and spreadsheet technology by using simulations to produce documents. The simulations represent actual work in an office. Students exhibit time management while prioritizing documents received and processed. The student’s portfolio demonstrates skill level and competencies met in various coursework.

    Prerequisites: BTE 111 , BTE 112 , BTE 124 , BTE 114 , or instructor permission.

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Organize workload
    • Create business documents used in today’s industry
    • Evaluate own work
    • Recognize proofreading notations
    • Set priorities
    • Handle confidential information
    • Utilize information-processing tools to solve problems
    • Compose professional correspondence
    • Generate professional electronic documents for the office 


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    BTE 281 Project Management With Microsoft Project

    5 credits
    Students will learn to use Microsoft Project to assist them in the development and monitoring of a project.

    Prerequisites: BTE 120 .

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Plan a project
    • Create a project schedule
    • Communicate project information
    • Assign resources and costs
    • Track progress
    • Produce periodic and final reports
    • Run a project with a variety of stakeholders 


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

Chemistry

  
  •  

    CHEM& 121 Intro to Chemistry

    5 credits


    This course will cover measurements and scientific notation, molecular and atomic theory, chemical reactions and equations, mass/molar ratios of balanced equations, energy and rate relationships in chemistry, equilibrium, states of matter, solutions, and acid/base chemistry. Includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: ABED 046  or ABED 053  , and MATH 098  or MATH 099 , or equivalent placement scores.

    Quarters Offered: All

    Global Outcomes:
    This course teaches to the global outcome of Communication.

    This course teaches to the global outcome of Critical Thinking.

     

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Apply the basic principles of science including theory, observation, hypothesis, and experimentation
    • Calculate using metric measurements, scientific notation, significant figures and conversion factors
    • Differentiate between atoms, elements, mixtures, compounds, energy,  and states of matter
    • Identify the general structure of atoms and ions including protons, neutrons, and electrons, their properties and locations; determine the electron configuration of atoms, and state how energy and locations of electrons are related
    • Examine the arrangement of the periodic table and be able to use the table to predict information about the elements
    • Explain the concept of the mole and be able to perform a variety of calculations involving moles, Avogadro’s number, and mass
    • Explain the relationship of compounds within a chemical equation and relate this to mass and molar ratios of a balanced equation
    • Differentiate between an ionic bond/compound and a covalent bond/compound and be able to correctly name each compound
    • Demonstrate various chemical reactions, relationships, principles, and laws using laboratory experiments
    • Describe and understand the forces driving chemical and physical processes, including thermodynamics and kinetics and understand the basic principles of equilibrium
    • Draw Lewis structures of molecules and determine the three-dimensional shapes of molecules using VSEPR theory
    • Distinguish between the different types of intermolecular and intramolecular forces and understand their role in determining physical and chemical properties of substances
    • Calculate and prepare solutions of various concentrations and know how the properties of solutions differ from those of pure substances
    • Define acids and bases and determine the products of their reactions; understand buffer solutions and explain how they work
    • Examine and communicate the relationship between chemistry and living systems including the role of chemistry in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, cellular physiology, metabolism, and health


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20

  
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    CHEM& 131 Introduction to Organic/Biochemistry

    5 credits
    This course provides a survey of major functional classes of compounds in organic and biochemistry. Topics include structure, properties, and key metabolic reactions of the major organic and biological molecules of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Includes laboratory.

    Prerequisites: CHEM& 121 .

    Quarters Offered: All

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Examine the relationship between organic and biochemistry and living systems including the role of chemistry in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, cellular physiology, metabolism, and health
    • Classify organic chemistry and understand the role of carbon and nitrogen in organic chemistry and biochemistry, including the carbon and nitrogen cycles
    • Distinguish between the different classes of organic compounds (including alkanes, alenes, alkynes, aromatics, alcohols, amines, carboxylic acids, esters, ketones, aldehydes, and amides) and be able to assign a simple compound to the correct class
    • Identify basic functional groups and understand how each group affects the chemical and physical properties of the molecule
    • Determine the name and structure of organic compounds including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, alcohols, amines, carboxylic acids, esters, ketones, aldehydes and amides
    • Contrast organic molecules and their structural and geometric isomers and the concept of chirality
    • Apply acid/base and redox chemistry to living systems
    • Contrast aerobic metabolism against anaerobic metabolism
    • Generalize the application of nuclear chemistry in allied health occupations and environmental issues
    • Interpret the environmental impact of hydrocarbons on the environment
    • Identify the four organic chemistry groups: proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipids
    • Describe the general function of enzymes and how the shape of substrates affects them, including toxins
    • Apply general chemistry principles to basic mechanisms of common dental and medical drugs
    • Examine organic molecules and the role they play in energy release and metabolism based on bond types, structure, and function
    • Identify the effect of organic molecules in the environment and within living systems


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
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    CHEM& 161 General Chemistry with Lab I

    5 credits
    First in a three-course chemistry sequence for science and engineering students. This course introduces fundamentals of chemistry, including matter and measurement, the structure of atoms, periodicity and the electron structure of atoms, ionic and covalent bonding, mass relationships, and chemical reactions. Includes laboratory investigation of these topics.

    Prerequisites: One year of high school chemistry or CHEM& 121 , and concurrent enrollment in MATH& 141  or placement into MATH& 142 .

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Identify the components and limitations of the scientific method
    • Recognize differences between matter and energy, and heat and temperature
    • Use mathematical methods for solving problems, such as dimensional analysis, ratios and proportions, and algebraic equations
    • Describe the general structure of an element
    • Identify the atomic number, mass number, and atomic weight of an element
    • Calculate the atomic weight of an element
    • Explain and identify isotopes of elements
    • Distinguish between physical and chemical properties of an element, compound, and mixture
    • Identify the names of elements, ions, polyatomic ions, and molecules
    • Define electromagnetic radiation in terms of frequency, wavelength, and speed
    • Contrast wave and particulate properties of light and electrons
    • Use the quantum mechanical model of the atom to determine probable electron locations around an element
    • Relate the concepts of energy levels, shells, subshells, and orbitals to one another
    • Classify elements according to groups and periods on the periodic table
    • Use the periodic chart to predict trends in the radii of atoms and ions, ionization energies, electron affinities, and atomic properties
    • Compare the differences between covalent, ionic, and metallic bonds
    • Write Lewis dot structures for atoms, ions, and molecules
    • Use resonance structures to predict alternative bonding potentials in molecules and determine the most probable resonance structure by calculating formal charges
    • Predict whether a compound is ionic or covalent using electronegativities
    • Apply Valence-Shell Electron-Repulsion Pair (VESPR) methodology to predict the shape of molecules and polyatomic ions
    • Balance and classify chemical equations
    • Apply the scientific method to laboratory experimentation
    • Determine the densities of known and unknown substances
    • Find the molar masses and number of moles of a chemical substance
    • Calculate empirical and molecular formulas from percent composition
    • Use chemical equations to calculate stoichiometric relationships
    • Apply the concept of a limiting reactant in stoichiometric relationships
    • Prepare solutions of varying concentrations and properties
    • Identify common acids and bases
    • Compose a laboratory manual detailing all laboratory experiments


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    CHEM& 162 General Chemistry with Lab II

    5 credits
    Second in a three course chemistry sequence for science and engineering students. This course introduces fundamentals of thermochemistry, gases, liquids, solids, and intermolecular forces, phase diagrams and crystalline solids, solutions and chemical kinetics. Includes laboratory investigation of these topics.

    Prerequisites: CHEM& 161  

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Describe the exchange of energy in the form of heat and/or work at both the molecular and macroscopic levels
    • Calculate the change in enthalpy for a chemical reaction or physical processes
    • Use the kinetic-molecular theory to explain the behavior of gases from a molecular perspective and apply the ideal gas law
    • Apply stoichiometry to calculate relative amounts of reactants and products in a gaseous reaction
    • Use van der Waals equation to predict gas properties under non-ideal conditions and describe the difference in real gas and ideal gas
    • Predict relative Lattice Energies for ionic compounds
    • Describe intermolecular forces and chemical bonds and how they influence physical properties and phase transitions
    • Classify different crystalline solids and determine crystalline solid structure by X-ray crystallography
    • Predict whether a solute and solvent will mix to form a solution and calculate the resulting changes in the colligative properties
    • Apply the basic principles of collision theory to explain the energetics of a chemical reaction and determine the factors affecting reaction rate
    • Formulate an experimental rate law using the initial rate method or the integrated rate law method and judge the reasonableness of a proposed reaction mechanism
    • Develop laboratory practices for conducting experiments and reporting experimental results within the context of the scientific method


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
  
  •  

    CHEM& 163 General Chemistry with Lab III

    5 credits
    Third in a three-course chemistry sequence for science and engineering students. This course introduces fundamentals of chemistry, including chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, aqueous ionic equilibrium, free energy, co-ordination compounds, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Includes laboratory investigation of these topics.

    Prerequisites: CHEM& 162  

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Student Outcomes/Competencies:
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    • Express equilibrium constants for various chemical systems, including acid and base, complex ion, and less soluble ionic compounds
    • Solve word problems for systems at equilibrium to determine pH, concentration, solubility product, and equilibrium constants
    • Apply Le Chatelier’s Principle to a system and predict its response to the disturbance
    • Compare Arrhenius, Bronsted-Lowry, and Lewis definitions of acids and bases
    • Define buffer solution and apply the Henderson-Hasselbach equation to calculate concentrations and pH
    • Calculate concentration of anions for polyprotic acids
    • Describe titration and analyze the data provided (graphically) to calculate the concentration or pH of solutions
    • Discuss the effects of the thermodynamic properties of enthalpy, entropy, and free energy on chemical equilibria
    • Predict the spontaneous direction of redox reaction using standard cell potential
    • Analyze the relationship between cell potential, free energy, and the equilibrium constant for redox reactions and electrochemical systems
    • Predict the products of electrolysis and solve electrolytic stoichiometric problems
    • Examine magnetism, color, and biochemical and industrial applications in co-ordination compounds using Valance Bond Theory and Crystal Field Theory
    • Develop laboratory practices for conducting experiments and reporting experimental results within the context of the scientific method


    Total Hours: 60 Lecture Hours: 40 Lab or Clinical Hours: 20
 

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